Phrases to not say at work

Workplace should never tolerate racism, harassment, or any negative behaviour traits, be it in physical or oral form because the consequences will not only affect employees’ morale but also the company’s image. However, this principle might not be easier said than done when the very place you want to scream over tough project and difficult teammates is in the office. It is not easy to always control emotions in a work setting when we are too tired or too happy.

To prevent you from saying pointless and even harsh things, you need to avoid these unethical phrases when at work, during a meeting, or conversation with colleagues. 

“This is boring” 

It is exhausting to sit for a long hour during meetings, especially in a meeting that “seems” like a waste of time. When you’re stuck in such a situation, never complain or say things like “this is boring” – either loudly or quietly to colleagues. Don’t also murmur those words by yourself. If you do that, your boss might think that you are unable to stay committed and focus on certain things. 

Instead of saying phrases similar to “this is boring”, you can talk to your manager the next day or after the meeting about how you feel. Tell him that while the meeting is necessary, it took too long that it ended up interrupting everyone from working. If your boss is a good leader, he will listen to your feedback and do something about it. 

See also: Backstabber at Work: The Signs and What Should You Do About It

“I was doing this and that and … during my weekend” 

Sharing is caring but this does not apply when your boss or HR ask you the question “what did you do on the weekends or holidays?”. Revealing too much about what you did on your personal time could be a boomerang in the future. Even if you do productive things, revealing too much to your employers and coworkers might not be good for your work-life balance. Therefore, you can say one or two things about your personal matter but don’t go into details. To make it more polite, you need to thank your boss or HR for asking about your weekend. 

“It is not my fault” 

Having a job means you are ready for every responsibility that awaits you. Although certain task might not be under your liability, sometimes you are required to take responsibility for it. When your boss comes asking you about a project, never say “it is not my job to take”. Or, when your manager asks you to revise something that is not under your job desc, don’t say “it is not my fault so I won’t do it”. This indicates that you are blaming other people and are hostile or defensive. This can be bad for your personal image.

Instead of saying such things and making yourself look childish and irresponsible, you can tell your boss that you can help take a look at the project and revise it. Yet, when your plate is full already, you can ask your boss for an extended time to do the most important thing first. Alternatively, you can discuss the project with the person who did it but of course, acknowledge your manager first about it. 

“Thanks, hon”

This line is a little bit of a grey line. Calling someone with “baby or honey” will make it look offensive and even sexist. Especially in a workplace where people of diversity work together, these words might be interpreted differently. Remember, how you speak and communicate can change the workplace and work relationship flow. So, be careful with how you call your teammates and bosses. 

“Are you sure you can do this with your condition right now? 

When you ask the question to a coworker after medical treatment, it might sound caring. Yet, never throw the question to employees with disabilities or ill-body. This could mean you are underestimating them. Don’t say phrases that indicate racism or harassment such as “because you are black/Asian/white/having slanted eyes, you have no friends here”, or “You cannot do that with that body” as well. 

Read also: How to Tell: Are You in the Wrong Career, or Just Lazy?

10 College Majors That Help You Succeed Better For Years

According to Georgetown University Center, more than 35 percent of jobs require a Bachelor’s degree or higher. On average, jobs that pay $33,000 annually at the entry-level or $61,000 at prime age will demand college or university certifications. That being said, a college degree does hold huge importance in one’s career. 

Amongst many university degrees, there are various different majors. So, buried in plenty of major choices, which one should you pursue?

Depending on your life or career goals, whether to produce more cash or seek career advancements, we have listed 10 most demanded and promising majors to complete.

Note: All the indicators are based on Kiplinger data and Bureau of Labour Statistics.

  1. Electrical engineering

Unsurprisingly, our data-driven and tech-driven world lead to high demand for people who can design, build, and improve electronic and electrical devices. The data showed that the number of electrical engineers is expected to keep growing by 10.7 percent over the next decade. And also, studying electrical engineering is not limited to just computer-operated electronics. You can expect to take courses such as circuit analysis and design, digital systems, electric components tools and semiconductor technology.

  •   Starting salary: $69,900/ year
  •   Mid-career salary: $118,100/ year
  •   Job growth: 22.7 percent
  •   Online job posting: 1.1 million annually
  1. Nursing

Nursing major is promising in terms of demand. The field is very rewarding with 82 percent of employees in this degree report feeling a high sense of meaning in their careers. Nursing students must take several science courses including anatomy, chemistry, microbiology, and nutrition.

  •   Starting salary: $61,400/ year
  •   Mid-career salary: $77,600/ year
  •   Job growth: 16.3 – 35.2 percent
  •   Online job posting: 1.6 million annually
  1. Computer engineering

The world will be completely autonomous one day and this is the job of computer engineers to make sure that the automation does the work properly. Being a computer engineer means you should handy in research, design, develop and improve computer systems. You should also able to work on broad components such as circuit boards, networks and routers. You might also have an additional specific course in terms of computer architecture, digital logic design and system programming.

  •   Starting salary: $72,600/ year
  •   Mid-career salary: $120.000/ year
  •   Job growth: 9.4 percent
  •   Online job posting: 1.7 million annually
  1. Chemical engineering

Typically courses for chemical engineering program include biochemistry, chemical kinetics and thermodynamics, and other types of math and science. Completing this major will give you a set of skills, including how to use raw materials to create products such as clothes, food, fuel, drugs, and much more.

  •   Starting salary: $71.800/ year
  •   Mid-career salary: $126,000/ year
  •   Job growth: 8 percent
  •   Online job posting: 116,736 annually
  1. Civil engineering

Job opportunities in civil engineering major are more plentiful than any engineering fields. Civil engineers, who design and supervise the construction of airports, sewer systems, and other large projects, are expected to add more than 38.000 positions. The courses include fluid mechanics, statics, structural analysis and design, and thermodynamics. 

  •   Starting salary: $60,400/ year
  •   Mid-career salary: $101,100/ year
  •   Job growth: 11 percent
  •   Online job posting: 259,586 annually
  1. Biomedical engineering

Biomedical students learn more about the way technology impacts medicine such as artificial internal organs or diagnostics machines. There are specific courses you can take, including anatomy, biomechanics and micromechanics, and robotics.

  •   Starting salary: $66,000/ year
  •   Mid-career salary: $110,300/ year
  •   Job growth: 8.4 percent
  •   Online job posting: 35,893 annually
  1. Computer science

Another board subject in computer, computer science program helps you prepare a number of jobs in the tech field from app developer to systems analysts. Learning to program is key to this major. You can also expect to take additional learning like a theory of formal language, intro to program design, digital systems design, and artificial intelligence.

  •   Starting salary: $68,800/ year
  •   Mid-career salary: $113,900/ year
  •   Job growth: 30.4 percent
  •   Online job posting: 2.2 million annually
  1. Construction management

The demand for buildings, especially eco-friendly buildings, is growing from time to time, which means there will be growing opportunities for construction managers. Obtaining this degree, however, requires you to cover both subjects in the physical labour of related work and business side industry. The courses include construction materials and systems, blueprint reading, cost management, labour law, and electrical-mechanical systems.

  •   Starting salary: $59,000/ year
  •   Mid-career salary: $100,400/ year
  •   Job growth: 3.3 percent
  •   Online job posting: 119,947 annually
  1. Mechanical engineering

Mechanical engineers design, develop, build, and test mechanical and thermal sensors and devices. You should also cover devices in terms of tools, engines, and machines. To complete the course, however, need a longer time for approximately 5 years or 4 years including a couple of summers. Yet, it is a promising job with hands-on work experience that complements your theoretical studies.

  •    Starting salary: $65.800/ year
  •   Mid-career salary: $108,700/ year
  •   Job growth: 9  percent
  •   Online job posting: 116,736 annually
  1. Petroleum engineering

Petroleum engineering is the strand of engineering concerned with the extraction, production, and management of oil and gas from natural environments. This field will give you technical and theological skills required to operate heavy machinery, manage computer systems, and discover new sources of energy. You can expect to study reservoir engineering, petroleum geoscience, drilling engineering, petroleum economics, and production technology.

  •   Starting salary: $82,700/ year
  •   Mid-career salary: $183,600/ year
  •   Job growth: 13.1 percent
  •  Online job posting: 1,643 annually 

Read also: Graduation Dilemma: Should You Take a Gap Year or Just Get Into the Workforce?

Graduation Dilemma: Should You Take a Gap Year or Just Get Into the Workforce?

Admit it, we all have been in a position where we aren’t ready to leave school and enter the workforce.

Upon graduation from college or university, there are good chances that fresh-graduates feel unready to join the adult world. The transition between being a dependent student to independent worker could be tough. You might find yourself surrounded by new people you don’t know how to deal with, get to know professionals that inspire you, make funny mistakes in your first job, and even embarrass yourself while adapting to the new environment.

Taking a gap year

As daunting as it might sound, landing a job is an important stage in life we cannot avoid. But here’s the good part: you do not have to get into there directly after graduation. Instead of putting yourself in the talent market directly, you can take a break first. 

See also: What Do Employers Look for in Fresh Graduates?

Having a “me-time” during the time gap will help you discover so much more. According to stats from Global Banking & Finance review, 80 percent respondents believed that taking a gap year can greater their chance of employability. You can fill the gap year with training or taking courses to help you prepare entering the adult world. You can also use the gap year to figure out what you really want to do in life. It will be a good experience as you can avoid making mistakes from your lack of knowledge. 

In order to make your gap year more valuable, here are some other suggestions.

  1.  You should make your gap of employment useful to make intentional choices by taking a course or training. You will not be fully ready until you make a decision – so, use your knowledge and willingness to decide better.
  2.  You can set plans during your gap in employment. Of course, you cannot be unemployed forever unless you are being supported financially for a lifetime. So, create a plan of when you should be employed and what kind of job you want, then set a date to when you need to send the resume. Create an eye-catching resume so recruiter will see you during their employment. Visit here to find more tips on how to create best resumes.  
  3.  You should clear your “bad reputation” in the network. Remember that no one wants to hire a ‘jerk’. So, if you happen to have posted something bad on your social media, it will be better to remove them immediately as recruiters nowadays conduct an online background check before hiring candidates. 
  4.  You can create a journal of your journey. Be it journal of your gap experience or lifetime, the notes will help you track your ability and improvements better. The journal will also help you during job interview session. For instance, you can refer to your journal what you are good and capable of doing best.
  5.  You can surround yourself with competent, good, and kind people. Consult and tell them about your unreadiness to join the adult world. They usually can help you set better goals and re-evaluate them for you. But of course, in the end, you should decide what’s better for you because only you know who you truly are and what you truly want to be/do in life.

Learning the adult world

While taking a gap year will benefit you a lot, you might wonder what employers will say about that when reviewing the resume as you might think that gap year will decrease your value in the employer’s eyes. Jason Clark in an interview, however, stated differently. He commented that an individual who has taken a worthwhile gap year is indeed an appealing prospect. “What we want to know is what people have done, why they did it and what they do to get out of it,” Clark emphasised. In other words, as long as you make a meaningful gap year, recruiters will still think positively about your unemployed time.

Nonetheless, if you want to get a job as soon as you graduate from university, college, or high school while you are not ready, you can always learn. You can learn how the adult world works by employing yourself in their world. It will not be as scary as you think it is. You might make funny mistakes but you can always learn from it. Besides, there is a free on-the-job-training, pocket money during your training, more experience and more chance of employability. You can also meet experts of your interest field as well as leverage your network when you join the workforce.

A piece of advice

So, how to decide between taking a gap year and diving into employment directly? The trick is to consider your needs and preferences first. After encountering your own doubts, you will figure out whether you are ready to apply for a job or not. Because if you are waiting to be ready, you might never move from your current position or you might never develop as a person. Best of luck!

 Read also: Things to Get Rid of If You Want a Career Success