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The whole world is going digital. With businesses undergoing digital transformation, it has contributed to the soaring growth of demands for IT talents. As the economic law goes, when demands exceed supply, prices tend to grow. This means that IT talents with in-demand skills can expect to see their pay rates grow as the shift to digitalization continues for the upcoming years. 

 

Why are IT Jobs High Paying?

Many of the best-paying IT positions demand exceptionally specialized skill-sets.  Professionals with matured skills are in short supply, especially in high-growth sectors and new technologies. It is duly noted that there are many different sorts of IT occupations, with the majority of them being classified according to their primary duties. There are jobs that specialize in security, development, or analysis, all of which are distinct from their technology counterparts. That is why businesses pay immensely; they want to attract great talent and even inspire others to pursue careers in that industry.

 

So, what are the high paying IT jobs in 2021?

 

1 . Big Data Engineer

Big data engineers are relatively new to the IT landscape, but they are arguably one of the highest-paying IT career paths. They help companies in understanding the meaning of all of their formatted, semi-structured, and unstructured data. These experts examine the data for trends and insights, then share what they uncover with corporate executives so they can make better business decisions. According to Salary.com, the estimated salary for big data engineers is $118,675 –  $159,135 annually. Though the number may vary across regions, big data engineers are generally entitled to high pay.

 

2 . Mobile Developer

Companies require Mobile App developers to construct and develop mobile apps due to the rising demand for mobile applications and usage. These programmers are well-versed in a variety of platforms, including smartphones and tablets under Android and iOS operating systems. They are expected to be fluent in programming languages such as C++, Objective-C, wireless networks, PHP, MS/SQL, Adobe, Java, HTML, “cloud storage,” XML, and JavaScript. In terms of salary, mobile developers are estimated to earn $92,542 – $114,325 a year.

 

Read Also: Top 5 Free Online Courses from Coursera in 2021

 

3 . Cloud architect

Many companies have opted for cloud servers, apps, and solutions since the emergence of cloud technology. It is today one of the most in-demand technologies, encompassing practically every aspect of the IT industry, including infrastructure, software, applications, services, products, and operating systems. Since this advancement is relatively new, cloud architect is a specialist role that is in demand to handle this area. Cloud architects often hold a bachelor’s degree in computer science or a closely related field. A solid foundation in scripting and programming languages is also required. They must be well-versed in the most recent cloud platforms, providers, and integration technologies. They must also be familiar with operating systems and networking, as well as cloud storage, service selection, arbitration, and cyber security. Annual salaries for cloud architects range from $140,000 to $150,000.

 

4 . Development Operations (DevOps) Manager

Development Operations (DevOps) managers are in charge of a team, responsible for the development and administration of database-driven apps. They will be in charge of the team and will assist them in completing tasks, therefore they must have prior experience as a manager or supervisor. Their daily tasks will include risk and resource management, scheduling, and status reporting. DevOps managers will frequently maintain systems and establish vendor contracts. They may also be required to assist with disaster recovery, continuous maintenance, and stack problems. While the annual revenue of DevOps managers may differ in each country, the salary of DevOps managers in the US can be up to $118,546 per year, according to PayScale.

 

5 . AI Experts

The role of Artificial Intelligence (AI) expert is among the most in-demand tech jobs as many large corporations are using AI in their operations. AI experts are expected to have thorough command of essential skills such as data structures, strong problem-solving abilities, and algorithmic thinking abilities. They should be able to build code that is highly scalable, modular, and optimized for performance. In the last four years, hiring for this profession has increased by 74 percent annually, and it covers a few distinct titles inside the space, each with a very specialized set of competencies. According to Indeed’s Best Jobs In The US Study, job vacancies for this role increased 344%from 2015 to 2018 and had an average base income of $146,085 per year.

 

IT jobs are much more complex than many people know and the advancement does not seem to stop anytime soon. If you are already in this industry, it is best to stay current and upskill continuously, so your value will add as time goes by. On top of that, knowing that IT jobs are in-demand and offer high salaries, you may have found one more reason to love your job even more now!

 

Read Also: 5 Business Trends to Anticipate in 2022

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Think you have done well in your recent job interview? Great! But you’re not done yet. Acing a job interview is one thing, but to actually make a good lasting impression on the hiring managers is quite another. So, how can you make sure that you stand out from the rest? The answer lies in your thank-you email.

Why It Matters

It may look menial, but a thank-you email sent after an interview can give you a better shot at landing your dream job. A study by Robert Half suggested that thank-you emails are important to 80 % of HR managers in making a final hiring decision. Unfortunately, however, a CareerBuilder survey showed that after an interview, 57% of job applicants do not write thank-you emails. Although it is not an official requirement, a thank-you email can give you a plus point in the eye of recruiters, as proven by the aforementioned research.

 

Writing a Thank-You Email

What you say and how you say it can make or break your interview follow-up email. Here are a few essential parts to consider: subject line, personalized introduction, appreciation remark, experience summary, and your readiness for the next step.

 

Subject Line

The subject line is the first thing people see in their email inbox. You should utilize this to communicate the message’s meaning. You can get readers to click on your subject line in a variety of ways. Make it personal by using the interviewer’s name instead of a broader term like “hiring manager”. Here are some examples of good subject lines you can use:

  • Thank you, [Interviewer’s Name]!
  • I enjoyed learning more about [Company Name]
  • Thanks for the interview yesterday

 

Read Also: Which One is More Important: Degree Certificate or Skill Certificate?

 

Begin with Personal Introduction

You may already be familiar with an introduction as a part of an email, but this one for a thank you email may differ a bit. Do not go into the body of your email right away. Begin with a brief greeting, keeping it as warm or formal as the interview. Again, remember to use the interviewer’s name instead of referring to their position. This simple act indicates that you paid attention to the interview and how the interviewer introduced themselves. 

 

Show Gratitude

Since it is a thank you email, your aim is to show gratitude. Something along the lines of, “Thank you for the opportunity and your time earlier. It was nice to discuss the position of <job title> with you directly”, would be nice. If possible, double-check this part and make sure you do not give off a self-centered vibe. If you think you use too much “I”, then you may want to rephrase it.

Reminder on Your Experience

Recap what makes you so qualified for the position within your thank-you email. This may be a few sentences that summarize what you discussed in the interview, or it could be a link to some samples of work that support your experience. Describe what appeals to you most about the role and explain why. This way, your email following an interview will feel more personalized. Refer to your talents and experience and demonstrate how you will utilize them to help your potential employer achieve their goals.

 

Willingness to Follow the Next Step

One last crucial step to close a thank you email is showing your willingness to follow the next step, regardless of the final decision. In fact, this can actually be a factor worth considering by hiring managers, since you demonstrate an eagerness. Show the hiring manager that you are available for further discussion and that you are eager to start working soon. If you have a notice period at your current job, it may be worth mentioning that as well. 

 

If You Change Your Mind

There are cases where you may change your mind about the job after an interview that you become hesitant to proceed further. Instead of ghosting the hiring manager, you can talk about it in a thank-you email. If the interview made you think that the position does not suit you, express this explicitly in your email. Other than saving them time to exclude you in the final decision-making, doing this will show honesty and genuine appreciation.

 

When Should You Hit Send?

Sending a thank-you note while you are still fresh in the interviewer’s memory is ideal. You need to send the email within 24 hours following the interview. This might take place on the same day as the interview or the next day. If the interview is on Friday, send a thank-you email that afternoon or plan it for Monday morning. Formal emails sent on the weekend can be a turn-off and an early sign of not appreciating day offs. 

 

Make sure your email comes across as genuine. Even a formal thank-you email following an interview should sound like it is written by a real person rather than a template. Hopefully, these tips can be of help. Best of luck!

 

Read Also: Useful Tips for Writing a Counteroffer

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10 Hidden Perks Job Seekers Should Ask Their Recruiters 

If you are in the process of negotiation with a potential employer and have achieved some deals for salary, don’t stop there – you could be leaving a lot on the table.

Many job seekers – including you, maybe – are looking for a new job for a bigger paycheck. However, your salary might have a limit based on your industry and experience level. No amount of negotiation will raise the offer from the average market salary. 

While your salary could not go up from the maximum market salary, you could ask for more non-financial perks from your recruiters, such as a flexible schedule and higher education tuition help. All you have to do is to bravely ask. Do not be afraid to negotiate no matter what the position or level of the job you apply. Negotiating this during an interview will also make you feel better because there is a great chance you’ll receive something more and become an engaged employee when the deal is finally made. 

See also: What To Expect during a Job Interview?

Here are 10 hidden perks and benefits you should be asking during your interview: 

1- Paid time off 

Paid time off could give you both full salary and time to rest. This is a perk most job seekers often forget to ask as they only focus on a bigger number on paycheck. 

2- Professional training 

These days no job is guaranteed or stable. You need to think less about pension and more about training opportunities that will help you scale in your expertise. 

3- Continuing education and licensing 

If the position requires continuing education credits to maintain your professional license, you can ask whether  the company will cover the expenses incurred. This might include travel budget. 

4- Stock options 

If the employer you’ll work for offers stock options to employees, you might want to ask for some stock option when starting to compensate for an offer with a lower starting salary. But before you negotiate this, make sure you do your due diligence. 

5- Unpaid vacation days 

Many companies have moved to the unlimited vacation policy. In this case, you should ask for a guaranteed number of vacation days. 

6- Offer a choice to the recruiter 

“Or” is the best word to use when you are thinking about what will make you happy at your new job. For instance, I want a 10K more salary or work from home on Fridays and Thursdays. I want a more flexible work schedule or more unpaid vacation leave. A successful negotiation is when both sides win. 

7- Student loan repayment 

If you are a new grad and salary is not as high as anticipated, you might not be able to pay off that debt looming over your head. Ask your employer if they are willing to offer student loan repayment assistance. This could be a good negotiation because you might not only have to ask for extra dollars per month, rather than a bulk increase in your salary. 

8- Transportation stipend 

If you have a competing offer closer to your home, you might have the leverage to negotiate for some commuting funds. 

9- Work lunch and/or dinner 

Some companies offer daily or weekly food stipends. Other companies might offer lunch or dinner packages that will save you tons of money and time which would otherwise be spent on meal preparation. 

10- Exercise stipend 

Your employer satisfaction is important, but your wellbeing is also important. Therefore, ask for what is important for you to improve your wellbeing. For some, it might be flex hours, a stipend for exercise, or gym membership. These benefits could help you stay healthy which means less sick days and less risk of long-term injury for employers. It’s a win-win negotiation for both. 

Read also: 6 Reasons Why Recruiters Avoid Hiring Candidates with Employment Gap

5 Things Recruiters Know that Job Seekers Don’t 

Do you often find that recruiters and hiring managers are intimidating? Don’t worry, they are not. They simply want to give you the best hiring experience in their own way. What you should pay more attention to is the secret behind their actions, because there are certain things that hiring managers do not want to reveal in front of their candidates. According to Dandan Zhu, Founder and CEO at DG Recruit, here are a few things recruiters and hiring managers know that job seekers don’t. 

#1 – All basic qualifications having been met 

“The smartest people do not actually end up succeeding the most in real life, while the dumbest people also have just as good as a chance to survive, if not thrive.” 

It means that B or C level students might be as good as A+ students in real life.  In other words, when it comes to the workplace, this means that the most talented and technically savvy engineer doesn’t always become the CTO. Most of the time, it is usually the politically admired and personally connected talent who wins and progresses into the C-suite. Basic qualifications are important to be considered as a feasible candidate, but success is dedicated more by one’s ability to influence, actively listen and respond appropriately, level of social etiquette, and general accentedness by their peers and superiors than one’s technical scores. 

See also: Job vs. Career: Life-long Adventure after Graduation

#2 – HR people are not that important in the hiring hierarchy 

“As you become a serious professional, you can utilise LinkedIn to directly approach hiring managers.” 

Most graduates might think that HR people deserve the utmost respect as they were the gateway to their future career prospects. Yet, Zhu emphasised that it is the hiring manager that makes the utmost decision, while HR is the service and administrative function in the process. Hiring manager dictates everything, including who to interview, what price to pay them, who to hire, and which headhunters to utilise. 

#3 – Job applicants can negotiate and leverage other offers to great effect 

“In today’s world, it is all about the etiquette and manner in which you communicate.” 

As a job applicant, you might be scared of upsetting prospective employers about disclosing where else you are going for job interviews and how much money you actually want. Yet, if a high-demand labour market where the supply of jobs outstrips candidates available, you actually hold a lot more power than employers do. 

Therefore, it is vital for you to research your niche and whether the position you are applying for is currently in the high demand labour market or not. Only then, you know your worth to negotiate and be transparent about offers. If handled appropriately, this will increase employers’ desire for you, not penalise you for looking greedy or not interested. Communication is the mother of all success when it comes to negotiation, thus master it. 

#4 – Interview your interviewers harder 

“Don’t be scared to say what’s on your mind. If something important to you does not align with your future employer, things won’t work out anyways, so it is better to know before you take the job to begin with.” 

Commonly, candidates are so scared of losing job offers or being looked at as needy or demanding so they don’t actually say what’s on their mind. This, however, could hurt your success on the job even if you manage to get a great salary and offer. Chances are, you probably agreed to something that you did not fully understand or align with.

That’s why it’s your prerogative to be a strong communicator. Get the answers you truly need during interviews by asking tough questions that are detailed and specific. This is where you’ll be spending your next few years; you better be aggressive in how you get it out!

#5 – Interview even if you don’t need to 

“Go out and interview even if you don’t need to.” 

Due to loyalty, fear, laziness, and/or arrogance, most candidates refuse to proactively learn about what opportunities are available. Don’t be like these most candidates. No matter if you need to look or not, once you hit a certain amount of experience in your role, it is time to take your head out of the sand and start interviewing, even if just for your own education. 

Read also: What to Do When You Hear Nothing from a Job Application?

What to Do When You Hear Nothing from a Job Application? 

Have you ever sent resumes to some companies but none call you back? Or, did you hear radio silence after an interview? If yes, you are not alone. CareerBuilder survey found that a staggering 75 percent of job seekers said they did not hear back from a position they have applied for. The reasons for not getting a follow-up generally comes from employers or recruiters themselves and not the job seekers. Some of the reasons are as follows: 

  • Employer has lost job seeker’s job application
  • Human resources policy that does not allow company employees to respond to any inquiries from interview candidates. 
  • Lack of consideration to not notifying candidates, except for those employer’s interested most. 
  • Change in hiring plans, such as teams getting cut.

See also: Dos & Don’ts when Asking Questions to Recruiter

Hearing bad news is a bummer but not getting a response at all, especially from an industry you expected, is worse. The good news is that there is something you can do about it: be proactive. All it takes to get the ball rolling again is a little push in the right direction. Here are some of the ways you should try: 

  • If possible, contact the recruiter or hiring managers and ask if they can give you a quick update regarding your application status. It will remind them that it has been a while since they’ve worked on their hiring responsibilities. 
  • If you apply through an applicant tracking system, check the system to see if your status has changed, for example from ‘submitted’ to ‘under review’. If it hasn’t changed, the problem lies in your resume, thus it is better to rewrite the resume and apply again when appropriate. 
  • If you have a contact inside the company, ask them to track down the hiring manager. See if they can get a status update for you. 
  • If the job was posted online, check the web site if the job is still listed. If it is not, the job opening might have been closed or they have already filled the position with somebody else. At this point, you should move on and start anew. 

Read also: 3 Reasons Why Showcasing Your Personality during Job Interview is Essential

3 Reasons Why Showcasing Your Personality during Job Interview is Essential

Being a suitable job candidate for a specific position in a company requires more than a well-written CV. While having confidence could be one of the biggest advantages to being a candidate of choice, it might not be enough to secure a job offer. Job seekers must go beyond just well-written resumes by showcasing their personality.

See also: 4 Tips to Find a Job that Fits and Suits You

According to Heckman et al., personality has been a scientifically-proven predictor of job performance and assessing a candidate’s behavioural tendencies in a work environment. This allows recruiters to determine whether a candidate will be a top performer and if he/she will fit the culture of the company. Recruiter Experts cited there are three more advantages for job seekers when showcasing their personality during an interview: 

1- Your personality is a success indicator 

Personality is the driving force behind how one thinks, feels, acts, adapts and works. The stories you share in a job interview regarding past experiences can be an indicator of how you will deal with adversity and opportunity. Potential employers want a glimpse into your future successes and failures. Often, the simplest indicator is your personality. 

2- Skills can be taught, personality cannot 

More and more companies are realising that skills and knowledge can be gained on the job. However, personality is hardwired. If you come to the table with a personality that matches with a company’s culture, other technical skills can be learned over time. 

3- Culture is king 

Your personality can indicate that you will build good culture in a company which will create a healthy place to work, not only for yourself but also for others. 

Using insights from personality assessments and your past experiences to really understand what an ideal environment looks like will lead you to the right career path. Remember, it needs to be a fit on both sides. There is no use in denying your personality. 

Read also: 10 Suitable Jobs for YOU Who are Bad Communicators

Dos & Don'ts when Asking Questions to Recruiter

If you, as a candidate, are enthusiastic during an interview, the chance of getting hired is higher. An interview session is a place where you can figure out whether the job and workplace culture is a fit for you. Therefore, don’t hesitate to ask the questions you prepare beforehand to the interviewer.

See also: 6 Phrases to AVOID When Applying for Job and Interview

Here are the dos and don’ts that will help you get the most out of every question you ask: 

DO

  • Ask your most pressing questions first. These could be about the culture, goals of your future team or how performance will be evaluated.
  • Ask probing questions. Consider asking which personality traits are most common among the most successful employees, or what employees enjoy most about working there. 
  • Ask interviewers about their own career paths. For example, ask them how they decided to go into their field, or what steps they took within the company to attain their current position.
  • Ask about challenges. What will make this job difficult? What will you need to overcome?
  • Ask for their contact information and whether you can connect with them for further information.

DON’T

  • Don’t ask questions to sound smart. For example, interrupting the recruiter before he/she finishes their questions, just because you know the better option or better solution to the question asked. 
  • Don’t ask about something you could find online. This might make the recruiter think that you haven’t done your homework well. Remember that searching and researching information about the company before an interview is vital to your interview success. 
  • Don’t be unprofessional. You should limit yourself when asking questions even when the recruiter says that you can ask anything, NEVER ask about personal life, such as marital status, his/her personal salary, etc. 
  • Don’t push. If the hiring manager won’t answer your question, it’s best to leave it alone.

Read also: How to Discuss a Gap Year in an Interview

5 Types of People to Include in Your LIFE Circle

Networking has always been the top ingredient of success. In many cases, having a network will help in your job search, expand your knowledge, and improve your expertise. Yet, networking is not all about growing your list of contacts. You cannot just pick random individuals, ask their email or phone number and add them to your contact list, then contact them when you need help. More than that, networking is all about knowing someone at a deeper level that could help improve yourself as an individual.

With that in mind, it is essential to be selective when making new connections. Why? Because getting in a wrong networking circle could hamper your life. Meanwhile, getting yourself surrounded by the right individuals can give you a boost as you will get advice and feedback from a hand-picked group of strategic advisors who truly tip the scales in your favour. 

See also: 4 Tips to Find a Job that Fits and Suits You

So, who should be in your circle? Here are five types of people to include. 

The advocate 

The advocate individuals know you on a personal level, acts as a trusted sounding board, and likely a close friend or family member. When you ask a question such as “how can my first few jobs line up with my personal values?” to your advocate circle, they can help you by giving true answers because they know your ins and outs. 

The strategic “In” 

The strategic “In” is more like a connection of the outside. They are well-connected individuals, demonstrate a willingness to make connections on your behalf, and likely alumni, past internship advisors, or your professors. When you ask your strategic “In” circle about a new job in X company, they will happily connect you with the current employees of C-suites. 

The subject matter expert 

As the name suggests, subject matter expert networks are those who can offer you superior insight on a specific industry, give you an unbiased opinion, likely an alumni contact, professors, or family members. This circle can widen your skills and knowledge about the outside worlds, especially the professional ones. In addition, they can give you advice on how to develop yourself and always push you to grow. Usually, these people are those who will make you uncomfortable in your comfort zone. 

The financial guru 

We know that money is one of the most powerful weapons in today’s industry and being financially illiterate can usher you to more difficulties, such as debt, loan, credit, etc. That is one of the reasons why many employees demand financial programs within their organisations. In this case, you should find one network who can be a financial guru. This network is usually those who live to observe stocks and might work around numbers daily. They can be anyone, like your family member, advocates, friends, or project buddy. 

The social butterfly 

Last but not least, the social butterfly individual is someone who can encourage you to connect with others. They are very person-centred and love being the centre of attention. Having one or two social butterflies around will help you get out of your comfort zone and can teach you how to network better. This is especially good for a very introverted or shy individual. 

Read also: 10 Suitable Jobs for YOU Who are Bad Communicators 

Job Search Tips in Time of Crisis 

Hiring is slowing down but job seekers should continue searching 

Experts suggested that amidst the pandemic, job seekers should try their best because the job market will get fiercer. Industries who source for talents will hold the best and only those who remain competitive and consistent with their job search will get hired. 

Job seekers need to keep their job search active, moving forward with their job searching strategy. Experts said that job seekers should expand and nurture their network, focus on professional development, and refine their home schedule. These tricks will help candidates find topics during the interview or simply help market themselves in front of a recruiter. Recruiters want to hear an excellent story despite the lockdown, not some “lazy” work from home routine. 

See also: 4 Websites to Help You Create a Professional Resume 

Enrol for short-term jobs to get you creative 

Whether you are passively or actively looking for a job, enrolling a short-term or freelance job will make yourself more marketable. And who knows you’ll find your true niche during your job search? To start with, you can list your current top marketable skills and search for more opportunities to reveal hidden potentials. You can also start looking for telecommuting job opportunities and get creative about how you can leverage your skills virtually. 

Enhance your resume and LinkedIn profile 

LinkedIn has more than 600 million users in 2020 and many recruiters use this social networking to source new talent. So, don’t miss the chance and build-up your profile to attract recruiters. LinkedIn is also the best platform to connect with like-minded business people, helping you widen your professional network. 

On the other hand, you should redesign your resume to apply for a job online. Be all in and write everything necessary to get the recruiter’s attention. Keep in mind that your resume should pass both the ATS and recruiter’s manual screening. Based on a survey, a great resume should serve three critical goals: present a compelling career narrative, create visual balance, and illustrate a candidate’s value. 

Be prepared with a virtual interview 

Hiring during the pandemic might slow down but most industries are still doing the process of screening and online interviewing. The only change is that the in-person meeting will be put aside for now. Owing to such circumstances, it is advisable to prepare equipment and place for your virtual interview early on. Make sure you have the following requirements to create an effective virtual interview with prospective recruiters. 

  • Research the company and their niche, the job role, updated information regarding the role you are applying for, and prepare some questions to be asked to the interviewer. 
  • Prepare the equipment, such as a speaker, headsets, and cameras. Run a test on them and make sure that these tools are ready and able to work well. 
  • Get the interview schedule and interviewer’s name from the recruiter, if possible. Do your research on the interviewer so you can better know whom you are talking to. This will also help ease your interview anxiety because you already know their niche and how to approach them. 
  • Choose a clean, quiet, and well-lit space for the interview to reinforce that you are taking it seriously. 
  • Train yourself to focus on the camera when speaking, so it feels that you talk to the interviewer and not your screen. 
  • Speak louder during the interview. Raising your voice during a virtual interview conveys credibility and confidence, but make sure your voice is not echoing. 
  • Send a thank-you note after the interview along with some documents that you want to show to the employer to show how credible you are for the position. You can also request feedback to the interviewer. 

Read also: Working Well at Home during COVID-19 Pandemic 

Working Well at Home during COVID-19 Pandemic 

Working from home has become the new normal during the COVID-19 pandemic. And this new normal is predicted to continue even after the pandemic ends, with 90 percent of employees wish to continue working from home in some capacity after the lockdown lifts. However, the survey found that despite the willingness to continue working from home, nearly half of the respondents report a fall in productivity while doing so. The reason for this lower productivity is equally split among practical aspects of remote work, such as family members, having to work longer hours, and inability to access resources that they would otherwise have in the office. 

As a matter of fact, albeit remote jobs give perks to employees to work anytime anywhere they wish, remote work might result negatively more to some employees. Not to mention, employees who are still new to remote working might find themselves experiencing a slightly different version of routine that might result in boredom, isolation, anxiety, thus affecting their productivity. 

See also: Difference between Remote Work and Telecommuting

For you who are still adapting to this telecommuting, it is good to breathe deeply and follow these tips so you can work happily and healthily at home. 

  1. Treat it like real office work 

As tempting as it might be to work all day in your pyjamas, it is not helpful in making you stay productive as this change behaviour might decrease your mood and ability to work. Sara Sutton, CEO and Founder of FlexJobs, found that some people find that dressing formally is helpful and provides them with a sense of motivation, while also proving useful if they need to dial into a sudden video call. Otherwise, you should treat your remote work as a real job, take a shower, get a comfortable dress, and sit on a working table and chair. 

  1. Have a comfortable place to work 

Remote working allows you to work from your bed or sofa. You can also choose a place around your house in which you are comfortable with. However, psychologists advised that you should find a space that is separate from where you relax. Try to create your own designated working area. Work in a separate room, if possible. You should also optimise your environment and keep your desk space and area as tidy as possible. Remember that your working position influences how you work and your body posture, helping you to avoid body pain and aches. 

  1. Have a work routine 

Routine offers comfort and can help reduce feelings of stress. Thus, adjust your routine before and during this pandemic. For example, if you routinely involve hitting the gym before work, try one of many online workouts to start your day. If you routinely prepare your kids before work, do prepare your kids for their day and remind them to only call you when an emergency occurs. You can create an emergency list for your children. 

In addition, try to maintain your normal working hours, starting and finishing at the same time and taking your regular lunch break. The more you stick to your routine, the better and easier you will pass your workday during the quarantine. 

  1. Communicate 

A little hello from someone can go a long way in this digital world. Greetings your coworkers via Face-Time, Skype, or video conferencing will give you a sense of belonging. Staying in touch is also important because it gives us strength, especially for those who are working or living alone. So, during the break, you should check up on your friends and see how they are doing. 

  1. Don’t forget to maintain your boredom 

Albeit all of those tips above are helpful to maintain your workday, you still cannot shoo away from the boredom of living away from friends or family. As a social creature, we need a physical connection to help us stay motivated during the day. Therefore, it is also vital for you to maintain your off-work activities. 

As an example, you can get outside on your lunch break and take a little walk, whether that is around the garden or around the block as long as it is in line with government’s advice. You can also try some activities or hobbies that will help you stay motivated and happy. 

Read also: 6 High Paying Jobs that Allow You to Work from Home