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Most people are seeking convenience and security when looking for a job. In today’s digitised era, more and more people prefer to be in a job that requires them sit around all day and work on their laptop instead. However, if you want to stand out from the crowd and love to challenge yourself, here are 22 odd jobs, taken from Addicted to Success, you might want to consider as alternative career choices:

Embalmer – This is a dead-body sanitizer job. Not many people are willing to do this job but average salary of this job range from $45.000 upwards per annum.

TV watcher – You might never heard of it before. This job requires you to watch TV to provide viewer ratings or write subtitles. This profession is catching-up fast today. You can earn money starting from $25.000 for this job.

Elevator mechanic – Who would think this job can give you great salary? This job earn more than $70.000 per year. An elevator mechanic does not need to have professional qualifications but it might be a risky job.

Toy creator – Toy creator can make loads of money based on their creativity. Staring with $53.000, you can also get rid from stress by relieving your childhood memory.

Crab fisherman – Fishing for crabs can make you richer by more than $60.000 within a few months. Usually, college students take this job to clear up their education loans.

Live mannequin – This is the latest rage in high-end stores. They employ people to parade down with a dress of your choice. If you like modelling then you can earn about $50 per hour.

Mystery shopperDo you like shopping? Then you must love this job. Anonymous shoppers and service evaluators are employed by companies to assess their merchandise, quality, cleanliness and behaviour of employees at workplace. You can easily make $100 per week doing a single assignment.

Focus group participant – This is like a survey participant job. Being a part of such group will pay you $40 to $100 an hour and you will be required to give your opinion on products, ideas, or service.

Human statue – An age-old job requires you to dress like a cartoon or idol. After that, you should appear in promotional events or theme parks. Human status make about $25 to $200 per hour.

Voice-over work – This skilled work can give you $325 maybe more per 5 minutes. Even a novice can make up to $80.000 per year. What you need to do is to dub audio for cartoons and commercials.

Airplane repo man – If you are born to be a salesman then consider selling airplanes for a change. Plane costs run in millions of dollars and 10 percent commission means a lot of money. You can earn up to $900.000 per plane. Reselling just one plane can help you set aside a fortune for life.

Oil and gas driver – If diving is your passion then you can combine it with some odd job like inspecting oil rigs, laying pipes and welding under the waters. You could easily earn $80.000 per year.

Submarine cook – Working as a senior submarine cook in Australia could fetch you $200.000 per year. If you have about 6 years of experience as a cook on the sea, then this job is for you.

Lipstick reader – This job is like a fortune teller. You need to be able to read lip prints of women in high teas and parties and earn anywhere from $25 to $50 per hour. The reader tells about personality and future prospects of the person.

Bounty hunter – This one is really an odd job to be doing. Bounty hunter helps in getting a criminal who has skipped out on bail, back to jail. They can earn anywhere between 10 to 45 percent of the bail amount. Higher the risk, higher the money you make.

Sperm or egg donor – If you are young and in good health then this is an easy way to earn your second income. While men earn only maximum of $200 per donation, women can demand up to $8.000.

Body advertiser – painting your face in logos or etching tattoos on your skin are the best way for live ads for companies. You can earn from $100 to $5000 based on the size and importance of the tattoo.

Movie or television extra – Becoming an extra for a movie or TV cannot only give you quick money but also a chance to feature with your favourite star. A weekend on the sets can get you up to $200 per day.

Crime scene cleaner – Not everyone want to do this job and also the reason why it is a high paying odd job. Starting at $35.000, you can end up earning 6 figure salaries in no time.

Luxury house-sitter – Taking care of luxury houses while its owner are on vacation is a cushy job. You get paid for lazing around in a palatial house with food and other amenities for free and a $200 per week allowance. Great if you need a paid quite time in luxury.

Trash collector – A job as garbage collector might be looked down upon, but not any more if you know that it earns him $60.000 or more per annum.

Waterslide tester – This involves testing water slides in theme parks and luxury pools for quality, safety, speed, and more. A professional waterslide tester not only gets a great salary but also experience of travelling to exciting places.

Read also: A to D Tips to be a Productive Freelancer

 

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An interview is like a trade. You show off your skills, experiences and proficiencies, ‘sell’ it to a company, and they ‘buy’ them. When you are being offered the position, your salary negotiation skill will come into place!

Other than the need to know your worth and the median salary range in the market right now, you need to be equipped with negotiation skills! Using the wrong strategies might just lead you to the path of failure. No one wants to be underpaid and learning some great negotiation skills will do you some good!

Can’t wait to negotiate? Slow down! Be a smart candidate and here are the top 5 mistakes when negotiating a salary that you have to avoid:

Lack of research

Some candidates state their expected salary without much researching. They tend to decide the salary expectation merely based on what they need or by guessing.

Do research the valid market rate for the job position! Considering the working experience, qualifications, responsibilities and the geographic area of the industry are essential, as these points will determine the standard wage you deserve. Online salary reference is a useful resource, but keep in mind that the listed job titles might have a different scope of responsibilities.

It is also advisable to check within your network of people in the same job position. If it’s needed, do cross check with some recruiters from a professional organisation to find out how you should measure your expected salary.

Not asking for more

For some people, it might be awkward to negotiate a sensitive topic like salary. However, not negotiating at all might be worse off. Are you afraid if the employers will pull the offer? As long as you know where your capabilities are and the ability to fulfil well or even more than what the company expected. Do not ‘downgrade’ yourself so that you can get the job! Other than just considering the salary you are asking for, employers are also looking for the right talent fit!

Failing to consider non-salary items

Monetary might not give you the job satisfaction you need. Value your future employers, as they might be giving you a standard base salary but they could be offering other great benefits. A yearly bonus, regular business trips (across the cities or countries!), allowances, rewards to achievements and great retirement plan are some non-salary items worth considering! Thus, look at the overall package they are offering you.

Allow your future employers to know your last drawn salary

Some employers will ask you about the salary you are drawing in your previous job. Let them know and justify why you are currently asking for more.

Don’t take it personally

Salary negotiation is a good idea, but you might feel undervalued should the process goes the opposite direction. Do keep in mind that, business is still a business, and the employers will hire the best talents they can afford. When negotiation goes tough, and you are not able to accept the undervaluing offer, just let it go. Some companies also have their standard rules to the tier of salary package offered.

Salary negotiation is both challenging and tricky. Avoiding these 5 mistakes might help you out in future! Check out www.jobiness.com and find out what are you worth now!

Next read: Are You Well-Prepared for Your Internship? Beware of These Top 8 Common Mistakes!

Money happiness

I’m sure you’ve heard plenty of advice about how to increase your salary – job hop, make sure you get at least a 20% increase between jobs, don’t reveal your current salary, and so on. And we do this all in the hopes of being happier, because we’ve been ingrained with this idea that salary directly correlates to happiness.

Does it?

More money doesn’t make you happier – to an extent

According to this article, there is a solid benchmark at which money stops making you happy – USD75,000. That’s approximately a monthly salary of SGD8,000, meaning that any increase in your salary after that won’t necessarily make you any happier. But as the article cautions, before you rush out to chase after that magic figure, remember that there are many other factors that affect your happiness.

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Also, since we need to deduct 20% for CPF, that ideal figure for your salary is probably closer to SGD10,000.

Since the dawn of time, there have been sayings that money doesn’t equal happiness, like “money is the root of all evil” or “money isn’t everything”, and it feeds our innate belief that a higher salary isn’t going to buy you happiness. What this research study proves is something that humans have always believed, that material value will not equate emotional joy.

That answers the question, doesn’t it? A higher paycheck won’t necessarily make you happier because there are other, more important things in life. Check out Maslow’s hierarchy of needs – once you can fulfil basic physical needs, material things cease to be of value. You need to self-actualise, that is, do the things that you were born to do.

Read also: Passion vs Paycheck

Happiness

But wait – more money does make you happier

However, a more recent article debunks that theory, and proves that no matter your income level, a bigger increment will make you happier. Which makes sense, when you think about it – why would the rich want to be richer if they’re already achieved the maximum amount of happiness that money can buy?

The problem with this article is that it goes against our fundamental belief that happiness increases in direct proportion to wealth. It indirectly says that human beings are, at heart, mercenary creatures who crave pleasure above all else. It implies that humans are no better than animals, in that sense. It insults our sense of self-worth as people, because we always think we are above our basic desires.

But a bigger bonus does make you happier, doesn’t it? You can buy more things, it gives you the sense of more freedom and you have to worry less about cost. Happiness isn’t always so easy to see in others, but their number of worldly goods is. We assume that the more stuff someone has, the happier they are.

Read also: Find Meaning in Your Job

Which one is right?

With these two conflicting studies, what is the answer? After all, the studies have been conducted by reputable institutions, and they both clearly have the evidence to back up their thesis. Both make sense, and yet they can’t both be right, can they?

Can money buy you happiness?

I believe that question can only be answered individually, not on a mass, homogenous level. And to answer that question, we must answer another question first.

To figure out whether money can buy happiness, we must first ask ourselves what happiness is. And that’s the fundamental problem – happiness isn’t universally measurable. Different things contribute to happiness in different ways for different people. A chai latte certainly doesn’t make every drinker equally happy, just as a café mocha isn’t everyone’s drink of choice. Remember the old saying, “one man’s meat is another man’s poison?” We were all wired differently, and hence we all have different preferences, favourites, and (Facebook) likes.

However, because we assume that what makes us happy will make everyone else happy as well, we project that definition of happiness on to others. We see other people possessing things that would make us happy, but then we see that those people don’t value it as much as we do. We then come to the assumption that they don’t value it as much as we would, because they have so much of it and are therefore much happier than we are.

We don’t realise that they look at us the same way. We have the things that they would like, but we don’t value it as much as they do. They then think we don’t value it because we have so much of it, and are therefore much happier than they are.

Perhaps we have been projecting our version of happiness on other people, when in fact, all of us place a different value on different things. 

And so was born this misconception that with more things, come more happiness. This is simply because we all value things differently.

So what’s the answer?

It’s not how much money you have, but what you do with it, that makes you happy. Unless you’re Uncle Scrooge, who loves money for the sake of it, a fat paycheck itself won’t bring you happiness.

Don’t get me wrong – more stuff isn’t going to make you happier either. It’s practically the same thing as money. What will bring you happiness is, as Maslow pointed out seven decades ago, is self-actualisation. Doing the things that you were born to do.

What that means is to create. To make art. To help others. To make or do things that brings others happiness. To add to the collective happiness of the world. And not doing this as a one-off or only when we have time, but doing this constantly, on a regular basis.

This translates into doing a job, being in an occupation, and having a career that hinges upon adding happiness to others, instead of being based on how high a salary that job can give you. Ultimately, this means that your line of work is much more important to your happiness than how much you get paid. Make it a career that you can be proud of, an occupation that lifts up other people instead of manipulating them.

Because it’s when we make others happy, that we bring true happiness to ourselves.