5 Things Recruiters Know that Job Seekers Don’t 

Do you often find that recruiters and hiring managers are intimidating? Don’t worry, they are not. They simply want to give you the best hiring experience in their own way. What you should pay more attention to is the secret behind their actions, because there are certain things that hiring managers do not want to reveal in front of their candidates. According to Dandan Zhu, Founder and CEO at DG Recruit, here are a few things recruiters and hiring managers know that job seekers don’t. 

#1 – All basic qualifications having been met 

“The smartest people do not actually end up succeeding the most in real life, while the dumbest people also have just as good as a chance to survive, if not thrive.” 

It means that B or C level students might be as good as A+ students in real life.  In other words, when it comes to the workplace, this means that the most talented and technically savvy engineer doesn’t always become the CTO. Most of the time, it is usually the politically admired and personally connected talent who wins and progresses into the C-suite. Basic qualifications are important to be considered as a feasible candidate, but success is dedicated more by one’s ability to influence, actively listen and respond appropriately, level of social etiquette, and general accentedness by their peers and superiors than one’s technical scores. 

See also: Job vs. Career: Life-long Adventure after Graduation

#2 – HR people are not that important in the hiring hierarchy 

“As you become a serious professional, you can utilise LinkedIn to directly approach hiring managers.” 

Most graduates might think that HR people deserve the utmost respect as they were the gateway to their future career prospects. Yet, Zhu emphasised that it is the hiring manager that makes the utmost decision, while HR is the service and administrative function in the process. Hiring manager dictates everything, including who to interview, what price to pay them, who to hire, and which headhunters to utilise. 

#3 – Job applicants can negotiate and leverage other offers to great effect 

“In today’s world, it is all about the etiquette and manner in which you communicate.” 

As a job applicant, you might be scared of upsetting prospective employers about disclosing where else you are going for job interviews and how much money you actually want. Yet, if a high-demand labour market where the supply of jobs outstrips candidates available, you actually hold a lot more power than employers do. 

Therefore, it is vital for you to research your niche and whether the position you are applying for is currently in the high demand labour market or not. Only then, you know your worth to negotiate and be transparent about offers. If handled appropriately, this will increase employers’ desire for you, not penalise you for looking greedy or not interested. Communication is the mother of all success when it comes to negotiation, thus master it. 

#4 – Interview your interviewers harder 

“Don’t be scared to say what’s on your mind. If something important to you does not align with your future employer, things won’t work out anyways, so it is better to know before you take the job to begin with.” 

Commonly, candidates are so scared of losing job offers or being looked at as needy or demanding so they don’t actually say what’s on their mind. This, however, could hurt your success on the job even if you manage to get a great salary and offer. Chances are, you probably agreed to something that you did not fully understand or align with.

That’s why it’s your prerogative to be a strong communicator. Get the answers you truly need during interviews by asking tough questions that are detailed and specific. This is where you’ll be spending your next few years; you better be aggressive in how you get it out!

#5 – Interview even if you don’t need to 

“Go out and interview even if you don’t need to.” 

Due to loyalty, fear, laziness, and/or arrogance, most candidates refuse to proactively learn about what opportunities are available. Don’t be like these most candidates. No matter if you need to look or not, once you hit a certain amount of experience in your role, it is time to take your head out of the sand and start interviewing, even if just for your own education. 

Read also: What to Do When You Hear Nothing from a Job Application?

How to Answer Behavioural Questions

Employers want to know that the candidates they hire will fit in both company culture and the position applied. In the job interview, hiring managers need to ensure that candidates have the qualities they are seeking for, therefore they often ask behavioural questions to uncover it.

Behavioural interview questions are questions that focus on how a job candidate has handled different work situations in the past to reveal their personality, abilities, and skills. Interviewees could use their work experience, volunteer positions, or sports experiences to answer behavioural questions. 

See also: 6 Phrases to AVOID When Applying for Job and Interview

Simplify with the S.T.A.R Approach

STAR is an acronym that stands for Situation, Task, Action, and Results. This interview technique offers a straightforward format which job seekers can use to answer behavioural interview questions. This technique requires interviewees to provide a real-life example of how they handle a certain kind of situation at work in the past. 

Behavioural questions usually are easy to recognise as they often have telltale openings like: 

  • Have you ever encountered a situation that makes you grumpy? How do you handle the situation? 
  • Describe your most daunting challenge and how you handle the situation?
  • Talk about a mistake you made. What happened and how did you handle it? 
  • Please describe a scenario in which you were under pressure. What was going on and how did you respond? 
  • Tell me about your proudest accomplishment. 

In some cases, recruiters can provide a situation in which interviewees have to answer with a real-life example based on their past experiences. 

Preparation checklist 

When answering a behavioural question, interviewees should be able to identify the most interesting event, hence could grab the attention of the interviewer. However, if interviewees do not have any work event related to the question, they can pick the most relevant ones from personal experiences. When doing so, make sure to tell a recruiter that the event happened not in the workplace but instead it is based on the personal experience. 

Here are tips to pick the best event and how you can relate it to the question: 

  • Categorise your experiences into successes, challenges, leadership moments, teamwork skills, and problem-solving situations. 
  • Practice your answer out loud before the interview session and plot the answer neatly. 
  • Get comfortable with your strengths and weaknesses because interviewers might ask more questions regarding your strengths and weaknesses. 
  • Always be honest. 

“It is all about lessons learned. Your answer to behavioural questions should demonstrate how you tackled and solved a problem. And of course, what you learned from this situation.” - Jodi Glickman 

Read also: 3 Reasons Why Showcasing Your Personality during Job Interview is Essential

What to Do When You Hear Nothing from a Job Application? 

Have you ever sent resumes to some companies but none call you back? Or, did you hear radio silence after an interview? If yes, you are not alone. CareerBuilder survey found that a staggering 75 percent of job seekers said they did not hear back from a position they have applied for. The reasons for not getting a follow-up generally comes from employers or recruiters themselves and not the job seekers. Some of the reasons are as follows: 

  • Employer has lost job seeker’s job application
  • Human resources policy that does not allow company employees to respond to any inquiries from interview candidates. 
  • Lack of consideration to not notifying candidates, except for those employer’s interested most. 
  • Change in hiring plans, such as teams getting cut.

See also: Dos & Don’ts when Asking Questions to Recruiter

Hearing bad news is a bummer but not getting a response at all, especially from an industry you expected, is worse. The good news is that there is something you can do about it: be proactive. All it takes to get the ball rolling again is a little push in the right direction. Here are some of the ways you should try: 

  • If possible, contact the recruiter or hiring managers and ask if they can give you a quick update regarding your application status. It will remind them that it has been a while since they’ve worked on their hiring responsibilities. 
  • If you apply through an applicant tracking system, check the system to see if your status has changed, for example from ‘submitted’ to ‘under review’. If it hasn’t changed, the problem lies in your resume, thus it is better to rewrite the resume and apply again when appropriate. 
  • If you have a contact inside the company, ask them to track down the hiring manager. See if they can get a status update for you. 
  • If the job was posted online, check the web site if the job is still listed. If it is not, the job opening might have been closed or they have already filled the position with somebody else. At this point, you should move on and start anew. 

Read also: 3 Reasons Why Showcasing Your Personality during Job Interview is Essential

3 Reasons Why Showcasing Your Personality during Job Interview is Essential

Being a suitable job candidate for a specific position in a company requires more than a well-written CV. While having confidence could be one of the biggest advantages to being a candidate of choice, it might not be enough to secure a job offer. Job seekers must go beyond just well-written resumes by showcasing their personality.

See also: 4 Tips to Find a Job that Fits and Suits You

According to Heckman et al., personality has been a scientifically-proven predictor of job performance and assessing a candidate’s behavioural tendencies in a work environment. This allows recruiters to determine whether a candidate will be a top performer and if he/she will fit the culture of the company. Recruiter Experts cited there are three more advantages for job seekers when showcasing their personality during an interview: 

1- Your personality is a success indicator 

Personality is the driving force behind how one thinks, feels, acts, adapts and works. The stories you share in a job interview regarding past experiences can be an indicator of how you will deal with adversity and opportunity. Potential employers want a glimpse into your future successes and failures. Often, the simplest indicator is your personality. 

2- Skills can be taught, personality cannot 

More and more companies are realising that skills and knowledge can be gained on the job. However, personality is hardwired. If you come to the table with a personality that matches with a company’s culture, other technical skills can be learned over time. 

3- Culture is king 

Your personality can indicate that you will build good culture in a company which will create a healthy place to work, not only for yourself but also for others. 

Using insights from personality assessments and your past experiences to really understand what an ideal environment looks like will lead you to the right career path. Remember, it needs to be a fit on both sides. There is no use in denying your personality. 

Read also: 10 Suitable Jobs for YOU Who are Bad Communicators

Tips to Find a Job that Fits and Suits You 

Chester Elton, an executive coach and author, said that too many people (job seekers) get caught up in the company’s reputation and brand. The truth is, working in a high-value company is not always a good fit for everyone. Elton suggested that if job seekers want to find a job that fits their personality, they should question more about whether their own brand and personality align with the company values, not their reputation or brand. 

Here are 4 tips from Elton for job seekers who yearn to work in a job that suits and fits them. 

1- Create a mentor network 

Having a mentor network is not only a good place to get advice, but also where you can turn to when it’s time to find a new job. You can include a mix of friends, family, classmates, professors and other advisors in your network. As your professional and personal networks expand, make sure to connect with people both in-person and online to develop a mentor network that is right for you. You should also expand your circle and select a diverse network. Be proactive about who you choose as a mentor because different people can be helpful at various stages of your career. 

See also: 10 Suitable Jobs for YOU Who are Bad Communicators 

2- Take a personality assessment 

Your personality is your biggest asset. It can certainly tip the scale in your favour during an interview process. You can use the assessment result of the personality test to target companies and roles that match your values and personality, thus you can work in a field that you enjoy the most. Here is one of the best and free personality tests you can try. 

3- Research company culture 

Matching your value to a company is key to success. When the company culture aligns with your needs and values as an employee, you will likely have better performance, engagement, and better teamwork organisation. Company culture is also the key to your own wellbeing, thus keep in mind to conduct research on the culture of the firm you want to work at. 

4- Get out fast if it does not fit 

While your first job is important, do not be afraid to make a change if it does not work as you expected. You should be your biggest advocate and adviser because a job that irritates you will only result negatively to your own personal and professional life. For instance, if you stay longer in a job that you do not enjoy, your stress level might increase significantly. Consequently, not only will you have lower productivity, but it will also affect the relationship with the people around you. Another alternative, you can speak to your manager about reshaping the position and if it does not work, you might need to seek a new opportunity elsewhere. 

Read also: Pros and Cons of Working in the Journalism Industry 

10+ Suitable Careers for Psychology Graduates 

Opportunities for graduates with degrees in psychology are expanding in number as well as in scope. The move towards preventing mental illness rather than diagnosing and treating it requires people to learn how to make healthy behaviour as part of living. In fact, many of the problems we are facing today are problems of behaviour, such as chronic health conditions or diseases, drug addiction, poor personal relationships, and violence. As a psychologist, you will contribute solutions to these problems through careful collection of data, analysis of data, and the development of intervention strategies. 

Subfields in psychology 

Many psychology graduates can teach psychology in academic institutions, from high schools to graduate programs in universities. Other subfields that graduates can pursue include the following: 

  • A clinical psychologist who assesses and treats mental, emotional, and behavioural disorders.
  • A cognitive and perceptual psychologist who studies human perception, thinking and memory. 
  • A community psychologist who works to strengthen the abilities of communities, settings, an organisation, and broader social systems to meet people’s needs. 
  • A counselling psychologist who helps people recognise their strengths and resources to cope with everyday problems and serious adversity. 
  • A developmental psychologist who studies the psychological development of human beings that takes place throughout life.  
  • An educational psychologist who concentrates on how effective teaching and learning take place. 
  • An engineering psychologist who conducts research on how people work best with machines. For example, how can a computer be designed to prevent fatigue and eye strain in people? 
  • An environmental psychologist who studies the dynamics of person-environment interactions. This job requires you to examine behaviour evolving at various scales and from various processes. 
  • An evolutionary psychologist who studies how evolutionary principles such as mutation, adaptation, and selective fitness influence human thought, feeling, and behaviour. 
  • An experimental psychologist who studies a wide range of psychological phenomena, including cognitive processes, comparative psychology, and learning and conditioning. 

Other subfields that are also interesting to pursue in a psychology degree are forensic psychology, health psychology, industrial/organisational psychology, neuropsychologist, quantitative and measurement psychology, rehabilitation psychology, school and social psychology, and sport psychology. 

See also: 10+ List of Jobs for Graduates with English Degree 

Job outlook for psychology graduates 

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, opportunities in psychology will continue to grow over the next decade. The field of study is also an extraordinarily diverse field with hundreds of career paths. Some specialities, like caring for people with mental and emotional disorders, are familiar to most of us. Others, like helping with the design of advanced computer systems or studying how we remember things, are less known. 

However, psychologists often work in more than one setting. For instance, college professors often consult for industry or see clients on a part-time basis. American Psychological Association cited that psychologists often found work in one or more of these areas: 

  • university/4-year college 
  • Medical school or other academic
  • School or other educational
  • Independent practice
  • Hospital or other health services 
  • Government or VA medical centre 
  • Business and nonprofit organisations

Other potential careers with a bachelor degree in psychology include the following. 

Note that the below list is just some of the list for your consideration. A psychology degree can cover a wider range in terms of the job field. 

Job analyst Disability policy worker Fundraiser

Human resource advisor 

Employment counsellor 

host/hostess

Healthcare facility Administrator  

Personnel recruiter 

Technical writer Systems analyst Writer 

Volunteer coordinator 

Training teacher 

Victim’s advocate 

Recreational therapist 

Psychiatric technician 

Public relations representative 

Coach Community organisation worker Computer programmer

Animal trainer

Benefits manager

Admissions evaluator 

Army mental health specialist

Labour relations 


Other careers that require a degree beyond a bachelor degree in psychology are as follows: 

Academic counsellor Applied statistician Art therapist 

Optometrist 

Occupational therapist 

Psychiatrist 

Neurologist 

Sport psychologist Speech pathologist Rehabilitation psychologist 

Psychiatric social worker 

Program evaluator 

Vocational rehab couns 

Neuropathologist 

Music therapist Multicultural counsellor Experimental psychologist 

Exercise therapist 

Educational psychologist 

Neurosurgeon

Veterinarian 


Read also:
How to Land Coding Job When You Have NO Experience

4 Websites to Help You Create a Professional Resume 

Writing a resume requires an effort because, in order to catch hiring managers’ attention, you will need more than just a basic-plain-look resume. You need to blend your creativity and professionalism to create a resume that grabs not only recruiters’ eyes but also that can pass the ATS systems. This sounds a lot of effort, isn’t it? Worry no more, we have compiled 4 resume builder websites to help you create both professional and interesting resumes. You might want to combine two of the choices below to create a top-notch presence from your resume.

See also: Key Skills Needed to Survive the 21st Century

LinkedIn 

LinkedIn is not only there to widen your professional network, but also help build up a professional presence. If you already filled up your details on your LinkedIn profile, you can save the information to PDF by clicking “more box” next to “add profile section” and voila, the resume is already generated. 

This LinkedIn resume generator, however, will write down everything that you wrote in your description, giving you 2 more pages of resume. Meanwhile, the most professional resume should be written in 2 pages or less.  So, if your resume is more than the maximum length, you can scale back the content of your profile until the PDF download only generates a two-page resume or less. 

Albeit the LinkedIn resume generator could give a professional description one-click away, the design and look of the resume is quite plain. Therefore, if you want to draft a fancier resume without decreasing the professionalism, try one of these interactive resume builders.  

KickResume 

KickResume can be synchronised with your LinkedIn profile, thus, you do not need to fill out the details again. Yet, if you don’t have LinkedIn, you can still use the builder by filling out some questions regarding your work experience, education, etc. After that, you can select a template. There are two options you can choose: Free and Pro (paid template). For the free version, you can still choose a bunch of template varieties. Otherwise, you can invest in the Pro version as it will give you more ease and freedom to be more creative with your resume. 

After finishing the initial steps, you can use extensive use of “Add Phrases”. Click on the “Fill in Your CV” – scroll down – and on the profile section click “Add Phrase”. This feature will help you add descriptions so your description can pass the ATS algorithm and will match what employers are looking for. 

After finishing all the sections, proofread and proofread to make sure you do not generate some mistakes. There is a preview button you can use to take a peek on your final resume before downloading it. 

Resume.com

Resume.com is a feasible resume builder that does not require you to create an account. You can start immediately from the home page by filling your name and click next. The resume will only produce a one-page resume regardless of how many job experience you have. 

To use this service, you can begin by selecting a template. After that, you can choose “Upload Resume” or “Create New One”. If you choose “Upload Resume”, you can upload your LinkedIn resume that you have downloaded and clean up the format and content. If you choose the second option, you can input the content from scratch within the same dashboard. 

In this website builder, please pay attention to the “Editor” on the side of the edit section. Each section offers phrase suggestions that might help you if you are building content from scratch. When you have finished editing, proofread again and simply download the resume. 

Wix

Wix is one of our top editor choices. It is an online portfolio and resume builder that provides many professional and creative templates to choose from, from free to paid ones. The free plan will include Wix domain, Wix ads, and 500 MB storage. Meanwhile, the paid ones will not contain ads on your profile, thus, makes your online portfolio smoother and more professionals. Other than that, Wix is a great resume website builder that provides some of the most precise customisation options through its drag-and-drop editor. 

To start with, you need to choose your favourite template then login/sign-up with your email. If you are a new user, Wix has a short video of how to start. You can either watch or pass the view (it is a one-minute vid, we recommend you to watch it). Then, you can customise your own portfolio look. Add pictures, write a short bio, and upload your downloadable resume, portfolio, or certifications that you have created beforehand. 

Read also: How to Get Your Resume Passed by the Robots & Into Recruiter Hands

Why & How to Get a Charity Job After Graduation

What is a charity job? 

Charity work is often confused with not-for-profit jobs due to their similarities in their job descriptions. However, these two are different from one another. In not-for-profit (NFP or non-profit), the organisations can be run by either volunteers or paid staff. The NFP also varies in size but is typically on the smaller end of organisation scale relative to other classifications such as non-government organisations. This non-profit organisation aims to not make a profit for personal gain, not hiring paid staff and/or volunteers and do not need to reach charitable status. 

Meanwhile, the charity job refers to a more specific not-for-profit organisation which has very strict guidelines as to how an organisation can qualify as a registered charity. Charity organisation’s aim is generally different from those of a job non-profit organisation. The purposes of charity work include benefiting the entire public or a sufficient section of public. Charity organisations can also hire both employees and volunteers. 

See also: 6 Phrases to AVOID When Applying for Job and Interview

Why work as a charity volunteer/employee? 

As you may know, working in a charity company does not come with a fat paycheck compared to working in private sectors. Yet, having experience of working in a charity organisation could give you two major advantages. First, it will give positive encouragement to your own wellbeing as you know that a charity job could give a huge impact to social communities. Second, a charity job is usually more flexible than having a job in a private sector or startup. The jobs also offer more flexibility in terms of working hours and job sharing opportunities which is great for you if you have an interest in other projects. 

Not only can working in a charity organisation improve your self-wellbeing, TotalJobs wrote that it also improves your resume headline, boost your network, as well as help figure out your true passions, goals and wants in life. Charity jobs are not beholden to political cycles and point-scoring, but instead has the luxury of being motivated by evidence and humanitarian values. 

Skills and requirements 

Albeit charity working seems like informal jobs, to gain or get accepted in a charity team, you still need to have certain values and skills. Mark Devlin, Chief Operating Officer for Unicef UK, told TotalJobs that working for a charity is about working for a bigger vision, own individuals goals and ambitions. That said, before getting accepted, applicants must first have ambition and at least know what they are involving themselves into. In general, employer of charity organisation would want to see the following skills in their candidates: 

  • Have great flexibility and innovation 
  • Able to multitasks 
  • Have excellent interpersonal, communication and negotiation skills 
  • Have organisation skills 
  • Can work in a team and individually
  • Have a lively and positive personality (cheerful) 
  • Ready to gain experiences and solve challenges 

Degree requirements 

There are some roles in charity jobs that you can apply, including charity fundraisers, volunteer coordinator, accounting, IT, HR, marketing, and charity officer. Some of these jobs (charity fundraiser, volunteer coordinator, and charity officer) do not need specific degrees. However, if you apply for a more specific job role, you might require a specific undergraduate qualification in the specified subject. 

If you want to improve your qualification, you can always enrol to the following subjects: 

  • Business studies
  • Community and development studies 
  • Social policy and administration studies 
  • Sociology studies 
  • Voluntary sector management courses 
  • Youth work courses 

How much will you earn? 

As mentioned earlier, working in a charity organisation would not give you much money, however, it does not mean that you will work for free. Even for an unpaid volunteer, you can get some perks too such as getting living costs or pocket money by registering in an overseas volunteer program. Larger charities in particular often offer more generous salaries to attract the best candidates. Based on TotalJobs review, the average salary can reach up to £27,500 with the range between £21,000 to £37,500 annually. There are also some charities that pay hourly. 

Read also: Why & Some Tips for Volunteering Abroad

Are You a Boring Job Applicant? 

Wake up, have breakfast, open a laptop, find a job in an online job platform, click apply, eat lunch, go out, go home, maybe open social media for a while, sleep, REPEAT. You don’t even bother to rewrite your job resume for a different job application and, probably, you use a simple bullet writing technique in your resume. If this sounds pretty much like you, please stop. Why? Because employers are not willing to hire such sluggish, effortless job seekers. 

Amanda Lannert, CEO of Jellyvision, said in an interview that the least a job seeker can do is to stop being “boring”. She explained that recruiters are often bored because people play safe. They (job seekers) commodify themselves into just a bullet-point list of skills and experience. This might look neat but it is one of the most boring things to read. 

See also: Most Important Networking Tips for Jobseekers

Here are other reasons why you can be a boring job applicant. You better avoid it! 

You do nothing besides job search 

It is understandable that you want to get a job as soon as possible, but sitting in front of your computer or smartphone all day searching for a job is a big no-no. Why? During an interview, you are going to be asked about your experience. While you can demonstrate that you are active leaders during your university, what will you answer when a recruiter asks, “What do you do in the meantime of your job search”? 

Therefore, go out. Talk to real people. Expand your circle and connection. Having meaningful activities during a job search can help you have an interesting discussion during your interview session which might catch recruiter’s attention and intention of hiring you. 

You focus too much on writing a boring resume

Crafting an interesting resume is important, especially if you know that the company you are applying to uses Applicant Tracking System (ATS). Resume with the right format and keywords will do the job. However, your resume can only contain your work experience, education, skills, or achievements – which tells so little about you, as a person. 

In this case, Lannert advised you to focus on the cover letter and not resume. There is nothing more refreshing than seeing someone who takes a chance to be incredibly human in cover letter or an outreach, to put themselves forward, she added. This will definitely catch recruiter’s attention as companies today need more empathetic and down-to-earth people. 

Tips: Use your own language. Use words that are not stiff or business jargon-y, especially words you usually find in the google site template. 

You do not go the extra mile 

Your cover letter and resume are top-notch so you are offered a job interview. You prepare for the interview and write some questions you want to ask a recruiter. However, during the interview, you are too focused on “selling” and “telling”. 

Telling and selling your skills are good, but showing them is extraordinary. Seeing your effort in preparing a presentation of how valuable your skills are or how great your ideas will improve the company’s business will be more appreciated. Besides, people are more convinced when you show them, instead of just telling them. 

Read also: 15 Minutes Before Interview : Absolutely Important For Job seekers!

The Most Common Reasons Why Recruiters Don't Call You After a Job Application

“Hey Alex, how’s your job application? Do you get an interview offer?” 

‘Nah, it has been a week and there is no call from the company. I feel bad about this. I really want to get into that company.’

__

For many of us, getting no call after submitting a job application feels so much worse than a breakup. You might spend days or weeks wondering why your dream employer does not reach back to you. You already have a professionally crafted resume and still no response. Waiting is painful, so here you go, the most common reasons why recruiters do not call you back. 

You are not qualified for the job 

The most simple reason for not getting a call back from a recruiter is that you are not qualified enough for the position you are applying. It can be that skills written in your resume are not enough. This is especially true if you are applying for a senior position. 

For example, you are applying for a “key accounts manager” with a past work history as an accountant. You also cited that you are a graduate with marketing experience. Albeit it sounds great for you, don’t expect a call back from the recruiter. Why? Because “key account manager” is a senior position that requires a lot of relevant skills and experiences.   

The job ad does not hire external candidates  

Job openings on some platforms that you know are probably there only for formality. This is the reason why recruiter does not call you after your application. Jacqui Barrett-Poindexter, an executive resume writer at Career Trend, said that employers often have policies that require them to post job openings to the public. In reality, there is not effectively a position available because that job openings will be filled by internal employees. 

You apply to an old job ad

One of the most common mistake job seekers does is that they do not review the job posting date before applying. Some employers do not take down their job postings after being posted. The reason is simple because employers have posted many job ads and do not remember where their old job postings are. So, it is advisable for job seekers to see job ads date before applying. 

ATS does not recognise you 

Nowadays, hiring managers rely on robot ATS (application tracking system) to easily shortlist candidate’s resumes and CVs. And ATS is tricky for job seekers. You need to perfectly write your resume in order to get shortlisted by the machine. You need to mind your keywords richness and resume format. Read here for tips to pass this robot ATS. 

Unprofessionalism in your resume 

Another common thing recruiter prefers to hold the call is that you do not write your resume professionally. To illustrate, you are in need of a job and you apply for several jobs with the same resume. You forgot to change the employer’s name and you do not proofread your resume. What do you think recruiter’s think when they see this? There are 2 possibilities. First, recruiters might think that you are not serious applying. Second, recruiters might disqualify you for your fatal mistake like spelling wrong company name. 

That said, it is always good to write some resumes for different application, especially if you are applying for different roles. Second, always proofread your resume and ask someone to proofread it after you. 

Multiple applications 

You have applied to X company in the last three months but they did not hire you. X company puts a job opening again in a different role. Because you really want to work for the company, you apply for the second time. This time you are extra careful with your resume as to not make a mistake. However, they do not even call you for your second application. Why is that? 

The reason is your interview feedback from past applications is likely to be considered to determine whether you should be contacted or not. If you are flooding the same company with your resume, the employer will think that you are not serious in a specific role, leading to disqualification for your application. 

Changing of the hiring plan 

In the game of business, everything changes pretty fast. Projects get rebooted. Teams get cut. Or, recruitment gets postponed for the later date. When this happens and you apply from a recruitment agency, they might tell you about the cancellation. But oftentimes, an employer does not inform this to job applicants. 

To conclude, it is always better to move on after a week without a call from a recruiter. There might be many reasons and you cannot know which exactly why the employer you are applying doesn’t call you back. Another way, you can call the recruiter for clarification. Or, if you know that the company uses ATS, you better understand how their ATS works and create better resumes for the next application. 

Read also: How to Discuss a Gap Year in an Interview