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The whole world is going digital. With businesses undergoing digital transformation, it has contributed to the soaring growth of demands for IT talents. As the economic law goes, when demands exceed supply, prices tend to grow. This means that IT talents with in-demand skills can expect to see their pay rates grow as the shift to digitalization continues for the upcoming years. 

 

Why are IT Jobs High Paying?

Many of the best-paying IT positions demand exceptionally specialized skill-sets.  Professionals with matured skills are in short supply, especially in high-growth sectors and new technologies. It is duly noted that there are many different sorts of IT occupations, with the majority of them being classified according to their primary duties. There are jobs that specialize in security, development, or analysis, all of which are distinct from their technology counterparts. That is why businesses pay immensely; they want to attract great talent and even inspire others to pursue careers in that industry.

 

So, what are the high paying IT jobs in 2021?

 

1 . Big Data Engineer

Big data engineers are relatively new to the IT landscape, but they are arguably one of the highest-paying IT career paths. They help companies in understanding the meaning of all of their formatted, semi-structured, and unstructured data. These experts examine the data for trends and insights, then share what they uncover with corporate executives so they can make better business decisions. According to Salary.com, the estimated salary for big data engineers is $118,675 –  $159,135 annually. Though the number may vary across regions, big data engineers are generally entitled to high pay.

 

2 . Mobile Developer

Companies require Mobile App developers to construct and develop mobile apps due to the rising demand for mobile applications and usage. These programmers are well-versed in a variety of platforms, including smartphones and tablets under Android and iOS operating systems. They are expected to be fluent in programming languages such as C++, Objective-C, wireless networks, PHP, MS/SQL, Adobe, Java, HTML, “cloud storage,” XML, and JavaScript. In terms of salary, mobile developers are estimated to earn $92,542 – $114,325 a year.

 

Read Also: Top 5 Free Online Courses from Coursera in 2021

 

3 . Cloud architect

Many companies have opted for cloud servers, apps, and solutions since the emergence of cloud technology. It is today one of the most in-demand technologies, encompassing practically every aspect of the IT industry, including infrastructure, software, applications, services, products, and operating systems. Since this advancement is relatively new, cloud architect is a specialist role that is in demand to handle this area. Cloud architects often hold a bachelor’s degree in computer science or a closely related field. A solid foundation in scripting and programming languages is also required. They must be well-versed in the most recent cloud platforms, providers, and integration technologies. They must also be familiar with operating systems and networking, as well as cloud storage, service selection, arbitration, and cyber security. Annual salaries for cloud architects range from $140,000 to $150,000.

 

4 . Development Operations (DevOps) Manager

Development Operations (DevOps) managers are in charge of a team, responsible for the development and administration of database-driven apps. They will be in charge of the team and will assist them in completing tasks, therefore they must have prior experience as a manager or supervisor. Their daily tasks will include risk and resource management, scheduling, and status reporting. DevOps managers will frequently maintain systems and establish vendor contracts. They may also be required to assist with disaster recovery, continuous maintenance, and stack problems. While the annual revenue of DevOps managers may differ in each country, the salary of DevOps managers in the US can be up to $118,546 per year, according to PayScale.

 

5 . AI Experts

The role of Artificial Intelligence (AI) expert is among the most in-demand tech jobs as many large corporations are using AI in their operations. AI experts are expected to have thorough command of essential skills such as data structures, strong problem-solving abilities, and algorithmic thinking abilities. They should be able to build code that is highly scalable, modular, and optimized for performance. In the last four years, hiring for this profession has increased by 74 percent annually, and it covers a few distinct titles inside the space, each with a very specialized set of competencies. According to Indeed’s Best Jobs In The US Study, job vacancies for this role increased 344%from 2015 to 2018 and had an average base income of $146,085 per year.

 

IT jobs are much more complex than many people know and the advancement does not seem to stop anytime soon. If you are already in this industry, it is best to stay current and upskill continuously, so your value will add as time goes by. On top of that, knowing that IT jobs are in-demand and offer high salaries, you may have found one more reason to love your job even more now!

 

Read Also: 5 Business Trends to Anticipate in 2022

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Think you have done well in your recent job interview? Great! But you’re not done yet. Acing a job interview is one thing, but to actually make a good lasting impression on the hiring managers is quite another. So, how can you make sure that you stand out from the rest? The answer lies in your thank-you email.

Why It Matters

It may look menial, but a thank-you email sent after an interview can give you a better shot at landing your dream job. A study by Robert Half suggested that thank-you emails are important to 80 % of HR managers in making a final hiring decision. Unfortunately, however, a CareerBuilder survey showed that after an interview, 57% of job applicants do not write thank-you emails. Although it is not an official requirement, a thank-you email can give you a plus point in the eye of recruiters, as proven by the aforementioned research.

 

Writing a Thank-You Email

What you say and how you say it can make or break your interview follow-up email. Here are a few essential parts to consider: subject line, personalized introduction, appreciation remark, experience summary, and your readiness for the next step.

 

Subject Line

The subject line is the first thing people see in their email inbox. You should utilize this to communicate the message’s meaning. You can get readers to click on your subject line in a variety of ways. Make it personal by using the interviewer’s name instead of a broader term like “hiring manager”. Here are some examples of good subject lines you can use:

  • Thank you, [Interviewer’s Name]!
  • I enjoyed learning more about [Company Name]
  • Thanks for the interview yesterday

 

Read Also: Which One is More Important: Degree Certificate or Skill Certificate?

 

Begin with Personal Introduction

You may already be familiar with an introduction as a part of an email, but this one for a thank you email may differ a bit. Do not go into the body of your email right away. Begin with a brief greeting, keeping it as warm or formal as the interview. Again, remember to use the interviewer’s name instead of referring to their position. This simple act indicates that you paid attention to the interview and how the interviewer introduced themselves. 

 

Show Gratitude

Since it is a thank you email, your aim is to show gratitude. Something along the lines of, “Thank you for the opportunity and your time earlier. It was nice to discuss the position of <job title> with you directly”, would be nice. If possible, double-check this part and make sure you do not give off a self-centered vibe. If you think you use too much “I”, then you may want to rephrase it.

Reminder on Your Experience

Recap what makes you so qualified for the position within your thank-you email. This may be a few sentences that summarize what you discussed in the interview, or it could be a link to some samples of work that support your experience. Describe what appeals to you most about the role and explain why. This way, your email following an interview will feel more personalized. Refer to your talents and experience and demonstrate how you will utilize them to help your potential employer achieve their goals.

 

Willingness to Follow the Next Step

One last crucial step to close a thank you email is showing your willingness to follow the next step, regardless of the final decision. In fact, this can actually be a factor worth considering by hiring managers, since you demonstrate an eagerness. Show the hiring manager that you are available for further discussion and that you are eager to start working soon. If you have a notice period at your current job, it may be worth mentioning that as well. 

 

If You Change Your Mind

There are cases where you may change your mind about the job after an interview that you become hesitant to proceed further. Instead of ghosting the hiring manager, you can talk about it in a thank-you email. If the interview made you think that the position does not suit you, express this explicitly in your email. Other than saving them time to exclude you in the final decision-making, doing this will show honesty and genuine appreciation.

 

When Should You Hit Send?

Sending a thank-you note while you are still fresh in the interviewer’s memory is ideal. You need to send the email within 24 hours following the interview. This might take place on the same day as the interview or the next day. If the interview is on Friday, send a thank-you email that afternoon or plan it for Monday morning. Formal emails sent on the weekend can be a turn-off and an early sign of not appreciating day offs. 

 

Make sure your email comes across as genuine. Even a formal thank-you email following an interview should sound like it is written by a real person rather than a template. Hopefully, these tips can be of help. Best of luck!

 

Read Also: Useful Tips for Writing a Counteroffer

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SMART Way to Negotiate for a Pay Rise 

Fun fact: everyone wants a pay rise, but only a few dare to ask for it.

A survey by salary.com found that only 37 percent of people negotiate their salaries, while an astonishing 18 percent never do. More surprisingly, 44 percent of respondents claim to have never brought up the subject of a raise during their performance reviews. The biggest reason for not asking for a pay rise, according to the survey, was fear. More than 30 percent of respondents said they were too worried about losing a job offer if they tried to negotiate, while nearly a quarter (22 percent) said they did not ask for more simply because they lack the skills to properly negotiate during an interview process. 

Salary negotiation can be scary but what’s even scarier is not doing it. Linda Babcock in her book Women Don’t Ask mentioned that only about 7 percent women attempted to negotiate their first salary. On the other hand, more than half (57 percent) men did negotiate their salary. Of those who negotiated, they were able to increase their salary by over 7 percent. 

Seven percent might not be much but let’s think it this way: If you get a $90,000 salary and your co-worker negotiates up to $97,000, assuming you are treated identically from then on, with the same raises and promotions, you would have to work 8 years longer to be as wealthy as them at retirement. 

Isn’t it better to ask then rejected than not asking at all? Hence, whether you are male or female, in your first or fifth jobs, it is time to learn how to negotiate salary or pay rise. Here, we share some SMART ways to smooth your salary negotiation. 

Specific and realistic

Be specific. What does it mean? It means you should know the amount of increase that you wish to see. With that in mind, be realistic. You should not ask for more than what the company can afford. At this stage, you should research the average pay of your role in the region. Then, calculate how much you currently earn and how much you want your raise to be. 

Make sure to ask at the right time

Right timing is key. Asking for a pay rise when your company is struggling to stay afloat or laying workers off will only result in failure. That being said, bring up the subject at a time when the company is doing well.

Ask yourself ‘Why do I deserve a pay rise?’

This is one of the vital steps. Your boss will not accede to your request just like that. You have to be ready to list out the reasons why you deserve an increase in pay. Think about the contributions that you have made to the company, your accomplishments and the increased responsibilities you have taken on that you can present to your boss.

Rejection is possible

There is a possibility of getting the answer ‘No!’. Stay positive even if you are rejected. Ask what is needed to be done to qualify for a pay rise the next time.

Threats aren’t going to work

When your request is rejected, don’t threaten to quit because that is unprofessional. Also, do not use another job to hold your boss hostage. Your boss is not going to like it and that would most likely make things worse.

As you can see, it does take some form of ‘skills’ to ask for a pay rise. You cannot just walk up to your boss and tell him that you want a bigger paycheck. Preparation is needed. And needless to say, confidence and politeness should be put upfront.

Read also: 7 Tech Jobs with the Highest Salary

Passion vs. Paycheck Which One Should You Pursue 

When you were young, what was your ambition? It must be something simple. We as children can do anything we are interested in, no need to worry about food and school tuitions. But as we grew older, things changed. We need to buy our own food, pay our own university tuitions, pay bills, etc. Money becomes important because everything comes with a tag price. Some of us might no longer be supported financially by our family. And as we become an adult and bear more responsibilities, we might encounter more dilemmas – should we work for passion or paycheck?

It is an eternal struggle for almost everyone out there. You will always see someone who earns more, someone who loves their job more, or someone who is happier than you. And that is when you question yourself – why do you work?

Passion

It is a very noble reason to be working for passion, because it hearkens back to a more idealistic time of your life, when a career means doing something you loved. But passion does not always equate to success, materialistically or otherwise. That is because the reason for work is altruistic – you do your job because you want to. And because of that, so much of yourself is invested in your work that success is so much sweeter, but failures will sting harder and closer to the heart than if you did your job for a paycheck.

We all have to pay our dues, and when failures accumulate, it is natural to look on the other side of the fence. See all our peers who work purely for income. And realise that their salaries are so much higher than your own. There will come a time in your life when you equate your self worth to your net worth – and you will ask yourself: Is this worth it?

See also: Key Skills Needed to Survive the 21st Century

Paycheck

Working for cold, hard cash is the answer, then. It is a practical, respectable reason for work. Our parents had only one rationale for employment, to support themselves and their families. Indirectly or directly, they passed that mentality to us. Working for money is good, moral, a Confucian ethic.

However, as you work for money, you slowly realise that money has a cost. Your time. You are using the time to pay for your money. Time that could be used to pursue your interests or to spend time with loved ones. Most importantly, time could be used to develop yourself as a person.

It is nice to have this nest egg. But one day you will look at your bank account, and you will wonder if it is all worth it when other people seem to be happier doing what they are passionate about, for so much less.

Is it passion or paycheck you should care about during young adulthood?

The reasons for work are not so binary. Other people stay on in their companies because they love their colleagues and the environment. Some stay in their jobs simply because they do not know what else to do. Many stay and work because the company offers them a good work-life balance.

But all happy people have one thing in common. They know what is important to them and pursue them. You see, no two people are alike. Money might be important to some individuals, but interest might be more important to some others. Having time to spend with family might be important to one, but good colleagues might be more important to another.

So, what’s important to you?

Different people value different things in life. Sports, friends, family, religion, money, passion, power, prestige – the list goes on. It is identifying what is important to you that is the key to happiness. The question is not whether to work for passion or paycheck, but whether you are working to fulfil the goals that make you happy.

Ask yourself what is important to you. If you do not know, try. It is completely OK to make mistakes, to try every possible reason to work, and to not have all the answers. That is what life is about. But once you know what is important to you, everything will fall in place. And then you will not just be working for passion or paycheck. You will be working for your own happiness.

Read also: How to Tell: Are You in the Wrong Career, or Just Lazy? 

The Power of Informational Interviews

Typical job interviews are started by recruiters asking a series of questions to see job seeker’s qualification. But in an informational interview, it will be the other way round. In an informational interview, job seekers will be the one who asks questions to obtain information of their preferred employers and/or job positions.

An informational interview is an opportunity to start a conversation with someone who works at a department that you’re interested in, or someone on your desired career path. Experts often refer it to ‘relationship building’ because this implies making authentic connections with people who could become friends, mentors, or maybe future colleagues. 

See also: Job vs. Career: Life-long Adventure after Graduation

Benefits of informational interviews 

Informational interviewing is effective for a college student looking to start their career. But it can be just as effective for mature adults who are in some form of career transition. Considering its major benefits (career exploration and networking), informational interviewing is designed for professionals at any career stage. Here are some other benefits: 

  • Obtain a great deal of information about your career field and the skills needed to do that job effectively. 
  • Gain a perspective of work that goes beyond the limitations of job titles, allowing you to see not only what skills are required for the job but also how you might fit into that work setting. Thus, you have greater flexibility in planning options.  
  • Get the opportunity to make personal contacts among management-level personnel.  
  • Gain insight into the hidden job market (employment opportunities that are not advertised).  
  • Become aware of the needs of the department and the realities of employment. First-hand and current information allows you to learn what happens on the job beyond the understanding provided through research. 
  • This exposure not only provides personal understanding but it could also result in your becoming a more impressive job candidate in the future.  
  • Informational meetings are comparatively low-stress because you are the interviewer. This is a great opportunity for you to gain confidence in talking with people while learning what you need to know.  
  • Because you are only asking for information, you are in control of the meeting; you decide which questions to ask. Later, evaluate the acquired information for personal use.  
  • It is an opportunity to learn whether you might fit into a particular organisation.
  • You can explore careers with someone who is actually performing the work you might want to do, thus allowing you to clarify your career goals.
  • You can obtain valuable feedback on your resume (and qualification in general), and help you determine what you need to do to make yourself more marketable for the career in question. 

Who to interview? 

Some tips for locating with whom to conduct informational interviews are as follows: 

  • Start with your current network, people you know personally. 
  • Search for professionals on LinkedIn. It is one of the largest databases of professionals in the world. 
  • Tap into professional and industry associations in your field of interest. They are great sources of career information – and contacts. 
  • Contact the alumni development office at your previous university, and colleges you have graduated from. They might be able to connect with alumni working in your field of interest. 
  • Identify the target companies you’d like to work for. Call them and ask for the names of individuals who occupy the careers of interest to you. Then, contact that person to request an informational interview. You can even connect to them on LinkedIn and use these connections to leverage an introduction. 

Read also: What to Do When You Hear Nothing from a Job Application?

Subscribe to Jobiness newsletter for the next series of informational interviews tips. 

Job vs. Career: Life-long Adventure after Graduation 

Congratulations on your graduation! So you have finished college, earned a degree, and now it is time to practice what you have learnt at school in the world of working. Whether you are dabbling with ideas or searching furiously for that first big gig, there are small steps you can take to ensure your first job works in lock-step with your long-term career goals.

What is a job and what is a career? 

A job and a career are usually used in the same context but serve different functions. Both are focused on how an individual earns money, but there are some differences you might never realise. 

See also: How to Answer Behavioural Questions

A job – is short-term oriented and tends to focus on earning money. 

Jobs have a small impact on future resumes because they aren’t typically related to what an individual career is or will be. Jobs also offer less networking opportunities because coworkers often won’t be continuing on the same field in the future career. In addition, most jobs consist of hourly wages, are more short-term, and focus on getting a task done. 

A career – is a series of related employment in one field that provides experience for your future and helps you earn better paychecks and living status. 

Career is all about building up skills through various employment opportunities, strengthening ability to move on to higher paying or more prestigious jobs. Careers provide a foundation of experiences that help fuel professional life for many years. In addition, careers are more long-term focused on learning, gaining experiences, building connections, and putting yourself in the right position for promotions and raises.

Creating professional life with purpose 

As a graduate, you might now look for an opportunity that can both help you earn money and earn dignity through skill advancement. If this is exactly what you are pursuing, ensuring that your job and career goals are aligned is important. Here are three tricks you can use. 

  • Overcome pressure – At times, you might feel immense pressure. It is natural, but don’t let it stop you. Work hard, learn and develop a lasting relationship and soon enough the pressure will pass. 
  • Be proactive - Employees, especially millennials, often get bored easily but do nothing about it. If you are among these people, make sure to turn your boredom into opportunity by getting proactive. Get creative and seek solutions. Young professionals who solve problems move up faster. 
  • Set simple goals – Workplace can be wonderful, yet confusing at the same time due to tight deadlines, ungrateful bosses, etc. Shadow talented co-workers. Gain control by getting simple goals. Make a list of skills you want to learn and get senior professionals around you to weigh in. Keep a checklist and hold yourself accountable. 

Read also: What to Do When You Hear Nothing from a Job Application? 

Dos & Don'ts when Asking Questions to Recruiter

If you, as a candidate, are enthusiastic during an interview, the chance of getting hired is higher. An interview session is a place where you can figure out whether the job and workplace culture is a fit for you. Therefore, don’t hesitate to ask the questions you prepare beforehand to the interviewer.

See also: 6 Phrases to AVOID When Applying for Job and Interview

Here are the dos and don’ts that will help you get the most out of every question you ask: 

DO

  • Ask your most pressing questions first. These could be about the culture, goals of your future team or how performance will be evaluated.
  • Ask probing questions. Consider asking which personality traits are most common among the most successful employees, or what employees enjoy most about working there. 
  • Ask interviewers about their own career paths. For example, ask them how they decided to go into their field, or what steps they took within the company to attain their current position.
  • Ask about challenges. What will make this job difficult? What will you need to overcome?
  • Ask for their contact information and whether you can connect with them for further information.

DON’T

  • Don’t ask questions to sound smart. For example, interrupting the recruiter before he/she finishes their questions, just because you know the better option or better solution to the question asked. 
  • Don’t ask about something you could find online. This might make the recruiter think that you haven’t done your homework well. Remember that searching and researching information about the company before an interview is vital to your interview success. 
  • Don’t be unprofessional. You should limit yourself when asking questions even when the recruiter says that you can ask anything, NEVER ask about personal life, such as marital status, his/her personal salary, etc. 
  • Don’t push. If the hiring manager won’t answer your question, it’s best to leave it alone.

Read also: How to Discuss a Gap Year in an Interview

Pros and Cons of Working in the Journalism Industry 

Every profession has its own pros and cons, including those working in the journalism industry. As one of the oldest professions in the world, journalism has changed monumentally owing to a staggering growth of technology. This means that the skeletal structure of this career remains the same, yet the responsibility and the view might differ. Compelling storytelling and fact-based are still its strongest pillar, however.

See also: Job Search Tips in Time of Crisis 

So, if you are interested in joining this industry, you better aid yourself with this information of working as a journalist. 

Pros of being a journalist 

  • In journalism, you are working with ever-changing expectations. For example, you can work in a very confidential matter but the next day, you might be asked to cover funny nerve-wracking news. 
  • You will always have a new challenge and demand, thus this job is great for you who can work under pressure. 
  • You get to meet and talk to a variety of people from all walks of life. You might also have a chance to cover and interview highly influential people like a minister. 
  • Your name will be published in print and on websites. This is a great way for you who seek professional identity. 
  • Lastly, you have a better chance to be invited to cover various events, such as theatre performance or restaurant meal reviews for FREE. 

Cons of being a journalist 

  • Whilst the job is challenging, this role is among the lowest salary rate. Unless you reach the highest and most popular level of a journalist, do not expect a fat paycheck. Reported by payscale, an average annual salary of a journalist is $40,839 with an hourly rate of $14.81. However, if you have editing skills, you can expect a slightly higher salary. Yet, even with years of experience (5-9 years) in journalism, the average annual salary is $44,384. 
  • Being a journalist is also a long and often unsociable journey which might demand you to work on weekends and public holidays. 
  • As a journalist, you have a greater risk of death or injury for covering a riot, war zone or other violent disturbance. 
  • Lastly, the peril of being a journalist is you might be blamed for bad news or being seen as the enemy by members of the public when covering sensitive news or events.

Read also: 10 Suitable Jobs for YOU Who are Bad Communicators

Job Search Tips in Time of Crisis 

Hiring is slowing down but job seekers should continue searching 

Experts suggested that amidst the pandemic, job seekers should try their best because the job market will get fiercer. Industries who source for talents will hold the best and only those who remain competitive and consistent with their job search will get hired. 

Job seekers need to keep their job search active, moving forward with their job searching strategy. Experts said that job seekers should expand and nurture their network, focus on professional development, and refine their home schedule. These tricks will help candidates find topics during the interview or simply help market themselves in front of a recruiter. Recruiters want to hear an excellent story despite the lockdown, not some “lazy” work from home routine. 

See also: 4 Websites to Help You Create a Professional Resume 

Enrol for short-term jobs to get you creative 

Whether you are passively or actively looking for a job, enrolling a short-term or freelance job will make yourself more marketable. And who knows you’ll find your true niche during your job search? To start with, you can list your current top marketable skills and search for more opportunities to reveal hidden potentials. You can also start looking for telecommuting job opportunities and get creative about how you can leverage your skills virtually. 

Enhance your resume and LinkedIn profile 

LinkedIn has more than 600 million users in 2020 and many recruiters use this social networking to source new talent. So, don’t miss the chance and build-up your profile to attract recruiters. LinkedIn is also the best platform to connect with like-minded business people, helping you widen your professional network. 

On the other hand, you should redesign your resume to apply for a job online. Be all in and write everything necessary to get the recruiter’s attention. Keep in mind that your resume should pass both the ATS and recruiter’s manual screening. Based on a survey, a great resume should serve three critical goals: present a compelling career narrative, create visual balance, and illustrate a candidate’s value. 

Be prepared with a virtual interview 

Hiring during the pandemic might slow down but most industries are still doing the process of screening and online interviewing. The only change is that the in-person meeting will be put aside for now. Owing to such circumstances, it is advisable to prepare equipment and place for your virtual interview early on. Make sure you have the following requirements to create an effective virtual interview with prospective recruiters. 

  • Research the company and their niche, the job role, updated information regarding the role you are applying for, and prepare some questions to be asked to the interviewer. 
  • Prepare the equipment, such as a speaker, headsets, and cameras. Run a test on them and make sure that these tools are ready and able to work well. 
  • Get the interview schedule and interviewer’s name from the recruiter, if possible. Do your research on the interviewer so you can better know whom you are talking to. This will also help ease your interview anxiety because you already know their niche and how to approach them. 
  • Choose a clean, quiet, and well-lit space for the interview to reinforce that you are taking it seriously. 
  • Train yourself to focus on the camera when speaking, so it feels that you talk to the interviewer and not your screen. 
  • Speak louder during the interview. Raising your voice during a virtual interview conveys credibility and confidence, but make sure your voice is not echoing. 
  • Send a thank-you note after the interview along with some documents that you want to show to the employer to show how credible you are for the position. You can also request feedback to the interviewer. 

Read also: Working Well at Home during COVID-19 Pandemic 

Improving Organisational Leadership Skills: Advice from Expert 

Leadership is an important function of management which helps maximise efficiency and achieve organisational goals. It is also one of the most sought after skills in recruitment besides flexibility and problem-solving, with companies spending nearly $167 billion on leadership development programs. Recruiters emphasise the importance of leadership skills in their job applicants. As a job seeker, if you want to showcase your credibility and stand out from the other candidates, you should boost your organisation leadership skills by mapping your skillsets against key personality traits and cognitive abilities that all effective leaders share. The traits include the following: 

Strong influencing behaviour 

Leadership is the ability to influence the behaviour of others, said Richard Petronio, Founder, President & CEO at Surcon International Inc. Leaders need to know how to influence and persuade their peers, both in pitching a new idea and trying to change a departments’ way of thinking. This will need good communication and other behavioural-based skills. That said, you are advised to train your way of communicating with others. Petronio said that effective leaders communicate with empathy. They strive to identify and understand their colleagues’ motivations and use that knowledge to make a change and build trust. 

See also: Passion versus Skill: What Comes First in a Job Search? 

Emotional resilience 

In a world where quick changes are made, leaders need to bounce back from failures and disappointments and not labour on them, advised Petronio. That said, it is important for leaders to remain emotionally and mentally calm in order to tackle this fast-changing and competitive world. To have stronger emotional resilience, you should rebuild your self-efficiency, emphasise empathy, practice patience, create better self-capacity, and always perceive possibilities. 

Practicality 

While leaders need to have the emotional resilience to deal with problems, they must be able to separate fact from emotion when making a decision. Solutions based on practical evidence are valid information. To be a practical leader, you should focus on carrying out concrete actions that can help achieve organisational objectives with more or less immediate reinforcement. However, you need to also carefully assess where you are gathering evidence to avoid any inaccurate reporting or miscommunication that might lead to poor decision-making.  

Extroversion 

Petronio said that effective leaders need extroverted tendencies, meaning you cannot just stay holed up in your office or room, laser-focused solely on your work. You need to walk around, connect, and communicate with transparency, as well as collaborate with others. This, however, does not mean that introverted individuals cannot be a good leader. A study published at Semantic Scholar found that introverts and extroverts are equally effective as leaders in both academic and corporate environments. Yet, the characteristics of introverted leaders might depend on the context in which they lead, meaning introverted leaders should emphasise on learning and collaboration.

Self-control 

Effective leaders listen and focus not on what they should say, but on what it is being said. When spontaneous decisions are required, leaders need to fight their urge to react. Hence, managing your emotion is crucial here. 

Ability to solve problems 

In the 21st century, businesses compete with more companies and make faster, creative and meaningful decisions in order to not lose from business rivals. As a leader, you are responsible for winning this competition – because if you don’t make a change, your competitors will. Successful leaders are comfortable in assessing situations and thinking holistically about organisation, as well as the long-term impact of their decision-making. 

Competency-based traits 

Apart from solving problems and being a good listener, leaders are also expected to be an expert in their field, meaning leaders should have additional competency-based skills when managing teams. This skill varies depending on job title and position’s level in an organisation. As an example, if you are working in the business development sector, your competency-based skills should cover all that is needed to achieve good and successful results in your department. 

Read also: Key Skills Needed to Survive the 21st Century