5 Things Recruiters Know that Job Seekers Don’t 

Do you often find that recruiters and hiring managers are intimidating? Don’t worry, they are not. They simply want to give you the best hiring experience in their own way. What you should pay more attention to is the secret behind their actions, because there are certain things that hiring managers do not want to reveal in front of their candidates. According to Dandan Zhu, Founder and CEO at DG Recruit, here are a few things recruiters and hiring managers know that job seekers don’t. 

#1 – All basic qualifications having been met 

“The smartest people do not actually end up succeeding the most in real life, while the dumbest people also have just as good as a chance to survive, if not thrive.” 

It means that B or C level students might be as good as A+ students in real life.  In other words, when it comes to the workplace, this means that the most talented and technically savvy engineer doesn’t always become the CTO. Most of the time, it is usually the politically admired and personally connected talent who wins and progresses into the C-suite. Basic qualifications are important to be considered as a feasible candidate, but success is dedicated more by one’s ability to influence, actively listen and respond appropriately, level of social etiquette, and general accentedness by their peers and superiors than one’s technical scores. 

See also: Job vs. Career: Life-long Adventure after Graduation

#2 – HR people are not that important in the hiring hierarchy 

“As you become a serious professional, you can utilise LinkedIn to directly approach hiring managers.” 

Most graduates might think that HR people deserve the utmost respect as they were the gateway to their future career prospects. Yet, Zhu emphasised that it is the hiring manager that makes the utmost decision, while HR is the service and administrative function in the process. Hiring manager dictates everything, including who to interview, what price to pay them, who to hire, and which headhunters to utilise. 

#3 – Job applicants can negotiate and leverage other offers to great effect 

“In today’s world, it is all about the etiquette and manner in which you communicate.” 

As a job applicant, you might be scared of upsetting prospective employers about disclosing where else you are going for job interviews and how much money you actually want. Yet, if a high-demand labour market where the supply of jobs outstrips candidates available, you actually hold a lot more power than employers do. 

Therefore, it is vital for you to research your niche and whether the position you are applying for is currently in the high demand labour market or not. Only then, you know your worth to negotiate and be transparent about offers. If handled appropriately, this will increase employers’ desire for you, not penalise you for looking greedy or not interested. Communication is the mother of all success when it comes to negotiation, thus master it. 

#4 – Interview your interviewers harder 

“Don’t be scared to say what’s on your mind. If something important to you does not align with your future employer, things won’t work out anyways, so it is better to know before you take the job to begin with.” 

Commonly, candidates are so scared of losing job offers or being looked at as needy or demanding so they don’t actually say what’s on their mind. This, however, could hurt your success on the job even if you manage to get a great salary and offer. Chances are, you probably agreed to something that you did not fully understand or align with.

That’s why it’s your prerogative to be a strong communicator. Get the answers you truly need during interviews by asking tough questions that are detailed and specific. This is where you’ll be spending your next few years; you better be aggressive in how you get it out!

#5 – Interview even if you don’t need to 

“Go out and interview even if you don’t need to.” 

Due to loyalty, fear, laziness, and/or arrogance, most candidates refuse to proactively learn about what opportunities are available. Don’t be like these most candidates. No matter if you need to look or not, once you hit a certain amount of experience in your role, it is time to take your head out of the sand and start interviewing, even if just for your own education. 

Read also: What to Do When You Hear Nothing from a Job Application?

Job vs. Career: Life-long Adventure after Graduation 

Congratulations on your graduation! So you have finished college, earned a degree, and now it is time to practice what you have learnt at school in the world of working. Whether you are dabbling with ideas or searching furiously for that first big gig, there are small steps you can take to ensure your first job works in lock-step with your long-term career goals.

What is a job and what is a career? 

A job and a career are usually used in the same context but serve different functions. Both are focused on how an individual earns money, but there are some differences you might never realise. 

See also: How to Answer Behavioural Questions

A job – is short-term oriented and tends to focus on earning money. 

Jobs have a small impact on future resumes because they aren’t typically related to what an individual career is or will be. Jobs also offer less networking opportunities because coworkers often won’t be continuing on the same field in the future career. In addition, most jobs consist of hourly wages, are more short-term, and focus on getting a task done. 

A career – is a series of related employment in one field that provides experience for your future and helps you earn better paychecks and living status. 

Career is all about building up skills through various employment opportunities, strengthening ability to move on to higher paying or more prestigious jobs. Careers provide a foundation of experiences that help fuel professional life for many years. In addition, careers are more long-term focused on learning, gaining experiences, building connections, and putting yourself in the right position for promotions and raises.

Creating professional life with purpose 

As a graduate, you might now look for an opportunity that can both help you earn money and earn dignity through skill advancement. If this is exactly what you are pursuing, ensuring that your job and career goals are aligned is important. Here are three tricks you can use. 

  • Overcome pressure – At times, you might feel immense pressure. It is natural, but don’t let it stop you. Work hard, learn and develop a lasting relationship and soon enough the pressure will pass. 
  • Be proactive - Employees, especially millennials, often get bored easily but do nothing about it. If you are among these people, make sure to turn your boredom into opportunity by getting proactive. Get creative and seek solutions. Young professionals who solve problems move up faster. 
  • Set simple goals – Workplace can be wonderful, yet confusing at the same time due to tight deadlines, ungrateful bosses, etc. Shadow talented co-workers. Gain control by getting simple goals. Make a list of skills you want to learn and get senior professionals around you to weigh in. Keep a checklist and hold yourself accountable. 

Read also: What to Do When You Hear Nothing from a Job Application? 

3 Reasons Why Showcasing Your Personality during Job Interview is Essential

Being a suitable job candidate for a specific position in a company requires more than a well-written CV. While having confidence could be one of the biggest advantages to being a candidate of choice, it might not be enough to secure a job offer. Job seekers must go beyond just well-written resumes by showcasing their personality.

See also: 4 Tips to Find a Job that Fits and Suits You

According to Heckman et al., personality has been a scientifically-proven predictor of job performance and assessing a candidate’s behavioural tendencies in a work environment. This allows recruiters to determine whether a candidate will be a top performer and if he/she will fit the culture of the company. Recruiter Experts cited there are three more advantages for job seekers when showcasing their personality during an interview: 

1- Your personality is a success indicator 

Personality is the driving force behind how one thinks, feels, acts, adapts and works. The stories you share in a job interview regarding past experiences can be an indicator of how you will deal with adversity and opportunity. Potential employers want a glimpse into your future successes and failures. Often, the simplest indicator is your personality. 

2- Skills can be taught, personality cannot 

More and more companies are realising that skills and knowledge can be gained on the job. However, personality is hardwired. If you come to the table with a personality that matches with a company’s culture, other technical skills can be learned over time. 

3- Culture is king 

Your personality can indicate that you will build good culture in a company which will create a healthy place to work, not only for yourself but also for others. 

Using insights from personality assessments and your past experiences to really understand what an ideal environment looks like will lead you to the right career path. Remember, it needs to be a fit on both sides. There is no use in denying your personality. 

Read also: 10 Suitable Jobs for YOU Who are Bad Communicators

5 Types of People to Include in Your LIFE Circle

Networking has always been the top ingredient of success. In many cases, having a network will help in your job search, expand your knowledge, and improve your expertise. Yet, networking is not all about growing your list of contacts. You cannot just pick random individuals, ask their email or phone number and add them to your contact list, then contact them when you need help. More than that, networking is all about knowing someone at a deeper level that could help improve yourself as an individual.

With that in mind, it is essential to be selective when making new connections. Why? Because getting in a wrong networking circle could hamper your life. Meanwhile, getting yourself surrounded by the right individuals can give you a boost as you will get advice and feedback from a hand-picked group of strategic advisors who truly tip the scales in your favour. 

See also: 4 Tips to Find a Job that Fits and Suits You

So, who should be in your circle? Here are five types of people to include. 

The advocate 

The advocate individuals know you on a personal level, acts as a trusted sounding board, and likely a close friend or family member. When you ask a question such as “how can my first few jobs line up with my personal values?” to your advocate circle, they can help you by giving true answers because they know your ins and outs. 

The strategic “In” 

The strategic “In” is more like a connection of the outside. They are well-connected individuals, demonstrate a willingness to make connections on your behalf, and likely alumni, past internship advisors, or your professors. When you ask your strategic “In” circle about a new job in X company, they will happily connect you with the current employees of C-suites. 

The subject matter expert 

As the name suggests, subject matter expert networks are those who can offer you superior insight on a specific industry, give you an unbiased opinion, likely an alumni contact, professors, or family members. This circle can widen your skills and knowledge about the outside worlds, especially the professional ones. In addition, they can give you advice on how to develop yourself and always push you to grow. Usually, these people are those who will make you uncomfortable in your comfort zone. 

The financial guru 

We know that money is one of the most powerful weapons in today’s industry and being financially illiterate can usher you to more difficulties, such as debt, loan, credit, etc. That is one of the reasons why many employees demand financial programs within their organisations. In this case, you should find one network who can be a financial guru. This network is usually those who live to observe stocks and might work around numbers daily. They can be anyone, like your family member, advocates, friends, or project buddy. 

The social butterfly 

Last but not least, the social butterfly individual is someone who can encourage you to connect with others. They are very person-centred and love being the centre of attention. Having one or two social butterflies around will help you get out of your comfort zone and can teach you how to network better. This is especially good for a very introverted or shy individual. 

Read also: 10 Suitable Jobs for YOU Who are Bad Communicators 

Tips to Find a Job that Fits and Suits You 

Chester Elton, an executive coach and author, said that too many people (job seekers) get caught up in the company’s reputation and brand. The truth is, working in a high-value company is not always a good fit for everyone. Elton suggested that if job seekers want to find a job that fits their personality, they should question more about whether their own brand and personality align with the company values, not their reputation or brand. 

Here are 4 tips from Elton for job seekers who yearn to work in a job that suits and fits them. 

1- Create a mentor network 

Having a mentor network is not only a good place to get advice, but also where you can turn to when it’s time to find a new job. You can include a mix of friends, family, classmates, professors and other advisors in your network. As your professional and personal networks expand, make sure to connect with people both in-person and online to develop a mentor network that is right for you. You should also expand your circle and select a diverse network. Be proactive about who you choose as a mentor because different people can be helpful at various stages of your career. 

See also: 10 Suitable Jobs for YOU Who are Bad Communicators 

2- Take a personality assessment 

Your personality is your biggest asset. It can certainly tip the scale in your favour during an interview process. You can use the assessment result of the personality test to target companies and roles that match your values and personality, thus you can work in a field that you enjoy the most. Here is one of the best and free personality tests you can try. 

3- Research company culture 

Matching your value to a company is key to success. When the company culture aligns with your needs and values as an employee, you will likely have better performance, engagement, and better teamwork organisation. Company culture is also the key to your own wellbeing, thus keep in mind to conduct research on the culture of the firm you want to work at. 

4- Get out fast if it does not fit 

While your first job is important, do not be afraid to make a change if it does not work as you expected. You should be your biggest advocate and adviser because a job that irritates you will only result negatively to your own personal and professional life. For instance, if you stay longer in a job that you do not enjoy, your stress level might increase significantly. Consequently, not only will you have lower productivity, but it will also affect the relationship with the people around you. Another alternative, you can speak to your manager about reshaping the position and if it does not work, you might need to seek a new opportunity elsewhere. 

Read also: Pros and Cons of Working in the Journalism Industry 

Pros and Cons of Working in the Journalism Industry 

Every profession has its own pros and cons, including those working in the journalism industry. As one of the oldest professions in the world, journalism has changed monumentally owing to a staggering growth of technology. This means that the skeletal structure of this career remains the same, yet the responsibility and the view might differ. Compelling storytelling and fact-based are still its strongest pillar, however.

See also: Job Search Tips in Time of Crisis 

So, if you are interested in joining this industry, you better aid yourself with this information of working as a journalist. 

Pros of being a journalist 

  • In journalism, you are working with ever-changing expectations. For example, you can work in a very confidential matter but the next day, you might be asked to cover funny nerve-wracking news. 
  • You will always have a new challenge and demand, thus this job is great for you who can work under pressure. 
  • You get to meet and talk to a variety of people from all walks of life. You might also have a chance to cover and interview highly influential people like a minister. 
  • Your name will be published in print and on websites. This is a great way for you who seek professional identity. 
  • Lastly, you have a better chance to be invited to cover various events, such as theatre performance or restaurant meal reviews for FREE. 

Cons of being a journalist 

  • Whilst the job is challenging, this role is among the lowest salary rate. Unless you reach the highest and most popular level of a journalist, do not expect a fat paycheck. Reported by payscale, an average annual salary of a journalist is $40,839 with an hourly rate of $14.81. However, if you have editing skills, you can expect a slightly higher salary. Yet, even with years of experience (5-9 years) in journalism, the average annual salary is $44,384. 
  • Being a journalist is also a long and often unsociable journey which might demand you to work on weekends and public holidays. 
  • As a journalist, you have a greater risk of death or injury for covering a riot, war zone or other violent disturbance. 
  • Lastly, the peril of being a journalist is you might be blamed for bad news or being seen as the enemy by members of the public when covering sensitive news or events.

Read also: 10 Suitable Jobs for YOU Who are Bad Communicators

10 Suitable Jobs for YOU Who are Bad Communicators 

Everyone has their own characteristics, skills, and preferences. Some people love crowded places, parties, and to be the centre of attention. Owing to their good communication skills, such people might find it relatively easy to get a job and maintain social status. Meanwhile, some others prefer to spend time alone, away from crowded places, and maintain a low-key life. Generally, these people would love to work in a quiet place since they don’t like to be involved in small talks and are not good communicators.

Which one are you? If you belong to the second group and are currently looking for a job that does not require much talking or good communication skills, here are 10 jobs that require low communication skills. 

See also: Job Search Tips in Time of Crisis 

Note: All the salary cited in this article is calculated by Payscale. Your salary can be lower or higher depending on your skills, education, and job experiences. 

  1. Locomotive engineers 

Do you like trains? If you like trains and have bad communication skills, this job will be perfect. This job requires zero speaking duties and you do not need to deal with a lot of people unless you need to, such as co-workers to report on some important stuff. 

The average salary for this job is $92,321 annually with bonuses and profit sharing. 

  1. Forest fire lookout (tower watcher) 

Working with less than 5 people. Sit and watch nature. Sometimes, you can even hear the birds chirping. What a dream job for someone who loves serenity and nature. Being a tower watcher requires far less communicating with others but you need to have high alertness.  

The average salary for this job is $41,067 annually. 

  1. Freelancer 

If you have some skills but do not want to work in the cubicle office, this will be perfect for you. Although you might be required to communicate with your clients, working as a freelancer gives you more freedom in terms of flexible hours and you can choose with whom you want to work with. 

The average salary for this job depends on the type of freelance job you do. Generally, a freelance writer is paid $24.07 hourly, while a freelance consultant is at an average $30.52 hourly pay rates. 

  1. Quality Assurance tester

Quality Assurance (QA) tester is a fun work to do that does not require much talking. Basically, you are responsible for playing video games, applications or other projects and write reports about it, such as if there are any bugs or glitches. 

The average salary for this job is $55,520 annually with bonuses and profit sharing. 

  1. Mail delivery service  

Although you have to walk or drive a long road, this job is still worth it for those who love to work alone with no boss looking over your shoulder. But there might be occasional customer contact that you must handle. This should not discourage you from taking the job if you are keen to work as a delivery service person. 

The average salary for this job is $60,000 annually.

  1. Editor 

You will work with a deadline but not around many people. This job also requires far less communication with others. You can be an editor for online publishers like Kindle Unlimited or you can edit papers submitted for research journals. You do not need to know the subjects. All you need is excellent target language skills (English, Portuguese, Spanish, etc.) 

The average salary for this job is $52,058 annually with bonuses, profit sharing, and commission.

  1. Night security 

If you are a night owl, you can be night security. Watch over dangers and enjoy the breeze of nightlife.

The average salary for this job is $12.06 hourly with bonuses, profit sharing, and commission. 

  1. Truckers

Another job that requires almost zero communication is becoming a trucker. You can travel far and drop goods in other cities. Being a trucker, however, will require you to travel a lot and you need to be physically and emotionally ready for the long trips. The good part is you can do the trip with your dog or your best friends to make it less lonely. 

A commercial truck driver can make $19.75 per hour with bonuses, profit sharing, and commission. 

  1. Podiatrists 

This job is responsible for diagnosing and treating a disease of the foot. Working in this job requires less communication but you might need to create a report in writing form. 

The average salary for this job is $130,142 annually with bonuses, profit sharing, and commission. 

  1. Database administrator 

The nature of this work largely focuses on an in-house job. Making communication with outsiders and public speaking is unimportant to this work. Work responsibilities include administering and managing computer databases. 

The average salary for this job is $73,765 annually with bonuses, profit sharing, and commission. 

Read also: 10+ Suitable Careers for Psychology Graduates 

10+ Suitable Careers for Psychology Graduates 

Opportunities for graduates with degrees in psychology are expanding in number as well as in scope. The move towards preventing mental illness rather than diagnosing and treating it requires people to learn how to make healthy behaviour as part of living. In fact, many of the problems we are facing today are problems of behaviour, such as chronic health conditions or diseases, drug addiction, poor personal relationships, and violence. As a psychologist, you will contribute solutions to these problems through careful collection of data, analysis of data, and the development of intervention strategies. 

Subfields in psychology 

Many psychology graduates can teach psychology in academic institutions, from high schools to graduate programs in universities. Other subfields that graduates can pursue include the following: 

  • A clinical psychologist who assesses and treats mental, emotional, and behavioural disorders.
  • A cognitive and perceptual psychologist who studies human perception, thinking and memory. 
  • A community psychologist who works to strengthen the abilities of communities, settings, an organisation, and broader social systems to meet people’s needs. 
  • A counselling psychologist who helps people recognise their strengths and resources to cope with everyday problems and serious adversity. 
  • A developmental psychologist who studies the psychological development of human beings that takes place throughout life.  
  • An educational psychologist who concentrates on how effective teaching and learning take place. 
  • An engineering psychologist who conducts research on how people work best with machines. For example, how can a computer be designed to prevent fatigue and eye strain in people? 
  • An environmental psychologist who studies the dynamics of person-environment interactions. This job requires you to examine behaviour evolving at various scales and from various processes. 
  • An evolutionary psychologist who studies how evolutionary principles such as mutation, adaptation, and selective fitness influence human thought, feeling, and behaviour. 
  • An experimental psychologist who studies a wide range of psychological phenomena, including cognitive processes, comparative psychology, and learning and conditioning. 

Other subfields that are also interesting to pursue in a psychology degree are forensic psychology, health psychology, industrial/organisational psychology, neuropsychologist, quantitative and measurement psychology, rehabilitation psychology, school and social psychology, and sport psychology. 

See also: 10+ List of Jobs for Graduates with English Degree 

Job outlook for psychology graduates 

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, opportunities in psychology will continue to grow over the next decade. The field of study is also an extraordinarily diverse field with hundreds of career paths. Some specialities, like caring for people with mental and emotional disorders, are familiar to most of us. Others, like helping with the design of advanced computer systems or studying how we remember things, are less known. 

However, psychologists often work in more than one setting. For instance, college professors often consult for industry or see clients on a part-time basis. American Psychological Association cited that psychologists often found work in one or more of these areas: 

  • university/4-year college 
  • Medical school or other academic
  • School or other educational
  • Independent practice
  • Hospital or other health services 
  • Government or VA medical centre 
  • Business and nonprofit organisations

Other potential careers with a bachelor degree in psychology include the following. 

Note that the below list is just some of the list for your consideration. A psychology degree can cover a wider range in terms of the job field. 

Job analyst Disability policy worker Fundraiser

Human resource advisor 

Employment counsellor 

host/hostess

Healthcare facility Administrator  

Personnel recruiter 

Technical writer Systems analyst Writer 

Volunteer coordinator 

Training teacher 

Victim’s advocate 

Recreational therapist 

Psychiatric technician 

Public relations representative 

Coach Community organisation worker Computer programmer

Animal trainer

Benefits manager

Admissions evaluator 

Army mental health specialist

Labour relations 


Other careers that require a degree beyond a bachelor degree in psychology are as follows: 

Academic counsellor Applied statistician Art therapist 

Optometrist 

Occupational therapist 

Psychiatrist 

Neurologist 

Sport psychologist Speech pathologist Rehabilitation psychologist 

Psychiatric social worker 

Program evaluator 

Vocational rehab couns 

Neuropathologist 

Music therapist Multicultural counsellor Experimental psychologist 

Exercise therapist 

Educational psychologist 

Neurosurgeon

Veterinarian 


Read also:
How to Land Coding Job When You Have NO Experience

Job Search Tips in Time of Crisis 

Hiring is slowing down but job seekers should continue searching 

Experts suggested that amidst the pandemic, job seekers should try their best because the job market will get fiercer. Industries who source for talents will hold the best and only those who remain competitive and consistent with their job search will get hired. 

Job seekers need to keep their job search active, moving forward with their job searching strategy. Experts said that job seekers should expand and nurture their network, focus on professional development, and refine their home schedule. These tricks will help candidates find topics during the interview or simply help market themselves in front of a recruiter. Recruiters want to hear an excellent story despite the lockdown, not some “lazy” work from home routine. 

See also: 4 Websites to Help You Create a Professional Resume 

Enrol for short-term jobs to get you creative 

Whether you are passively or actively looking for a job, enrolling a short-term or freelance job will make yourself more marketable. And who knows you’ll find your true niche during your job search? To start with, you can list your current top marketable skills and search for more opportunities to reveal hidden potentials. You can also start looking for telecommuting job opportunities and get creative about how you can leverage your skills virtually. 

Enhance your resume and LinkedIn profile 

LinkedIn has more than 600 million users in 2020 and many recruiters use this social networking to source new talent. So, don’t miss the chance and build-up your profile to attract recruiters. LinkedIn is also the best platform to connect with like-minded business people, helping you widen your professional network. 

On the other hand, you should redesign your resume to apply for a job online. Be all in and write everything necessary to get the recruiter’s attention. Keep in mind that your resume should pass both the ATS and recruiter’s manual screening. Based on a survey, a great resume should serve three critical goals: present a compelling career narrative, create visual balance, and illustrate a candidate’s value. 

Be prepared with a virtual interview 

Hiring during the pandemic might slow down but most industries are still doing the process of screening and online interviewing. The only change is that the in-person meeting will be put aside for now. Owing to such circumstances, it is advisable to prepare equipment and place for your virtual interview early on. Make sure you have the following requirements to create an effective virtual interview with prospective recruiters. 

  • Research the company and their niche, the job role, updated information regarding the role you are applying for, and prepare some questions to be asked to the interviewer. 
  • Prepare the equipment, such as a speaker, headsets, and cameras. Run a test on them and make sure that these tools are ready and able to work well. 
  • Get the interview schedule and interviewer’s name from the recruiter, if possible. Do your research on the interviewer so you can better know whom you are talking to. This will also help ease your interview anxiety because you already know their niche and how to approach them. 
  • Choose a clean, quiet, and well-lit space for the interview to reinforce that you are taking it seriously. 
  • Train yourself to focus on the camera when speaking, so it feels that you talk to the interviewer and not your screen. 
  • Speak louder during the interview. Raising your voice during a virtual interview conveys credibility and confidence, but make sure your voice is not echoing. 
  • Send a thank-you note after the interview along with some documents that you want to show to the employer to show how credible you are for the position. You can also request feedback to the interviewer. 

Read also: Working Well at Home during COVID-19 Pandemic 

Working Well at Home during COVID-19 Pandemic 

Working from home has become the new normal during the COVID-19 pandemic. And this new normal is predicted to continue even after the pandemic ends, with 90 percent of employees wish to continue working from home in some capacity after the lockdown lifts. However, the survey found that despite the willingness to continue working from home, nearly half of the respondents report a fall in productivity while doing so. The reason for this lower productivity is equally split among practical aspects of remote work, such as family members, having to work longer hours, and inability to access resources that they would otherwise have in the office. 

As a matter of fact, albeit remote jobs give perks to employees to work anytime anywhere they wish, remote work might result negatively more to some employees. Not to mention, employees who are still new to remote working might find themselves experiencing a slightly different version of routine that might result in boredom, isolation, anxiety, thus affecting their productivity. 

See also: Difference between Remote Work and Telecommuting

For you who are still adapting to this telecommuting, it is good to breathe deeply and follow these tips so you can work happily and healthily at home. 

  1. Treat it like real office work 

As tempting as it might be to work all day in your pyjamas, it is not helpful in making you stay productive as this change behaviour might decrease your mood and ability to work. Sara Sutton, CEO and Founder of FlexJobs, found that some people find that dressing formally is helpful and provides them with a sense of motivation, while also proving useful if they need to dial into a sudden video call. Otherwise, you should treat your remote work as a real job, take a shower, get a comfortable dress, and sit on a working table and chair. 

  1. Have a comfortable place to work 

Remote working allows you to work from your bed or sofa. You can also choose a place around your house in which you are comfortable with. However, psychologists advised that you should find a space that is separate from where you relax. Try to create your own designated working area. Work in a separate room, if possible. You should also optimise your environment and keep your desk space and area as tidy as possible. Remember that your working position influences how you work and your body posture, helping you to avoid body pain and aches. 

  1. Have a work routine 

Routine offers comfort and can help reduce feelings of stress. Thus, adjust your routine before and during this pandemic. For example, if you routinely involve hitting the gym before work, try one of many online workouts to start your day. If you routinely prepare your kids before work, do prepare your kids for their day and remind them to only call you when an emergency occurs. You can create an emergency list for your children. 

In addition, try to maintain your normal working hours, starting and finishing at the same time and taking your regular lunch break. The more you stick to your routine, the better and easier you will pass your workday during the quarantine. 

  1. Communicate 

A little hello from someone can go a long way in this digital world. Greetings your coworkers via Face-Time, Skype, or video conferencing will give you a sense of belonging. Staying in touch is also important because it gives us strength, especially for those who are working or living alone. So, during the break, you should check up on your friends and see how they are doing. 

  1. Don’t forget to maintain your boredom 

Albeit all of those tips above are helpful to maintain your workday, you still cannot shoo away from the boredom of living away from friends or family. As a social creature, we need a physical connection to help us stay motivated during the day. Therefore, it is also vital for you to maintain your off-work activities. 

As an example, you can get outside on your lunch break and take a little walk, whether that is around the garden or around the block as long as it is in line with government’s advice. You can also try some activities or hobbies that will help you stay motivated and happy. 

Read also: 6 High Paying Jobs that Allow You to Work from Home