All You Need to Know About Curriculum Vitae: The History

Occasionally known as a resume, a curriculum vitae is a document that summarises job seekers’ job history, academic qualifications, as well as personal skills. This piece of paper is so important for a job seeker to find a job and get hired. But why is CV so important?

A brief history of CV

Back in 1482, Leonardo Da Vinci had completed a written document outlining his skills to be sent to Duke of Milan. He wrote everything, including his experience of sculpturing, and building a bridge and cannon then he sent it to a prospective employer. 

After that, in the 1500s, the writing practice was adopted by travelling workers who wanted to introduce themselves to a local guildsman or lord for a job. That time, CVs were no more than informal handwritten scribbling made at interviews or meetings.

Then, in the 20th century, people began to include more information such as religion, marital status, and weight to their CVs to boost the chance of getting hired. In this century also, technology and information played a crucial role in modernising the CVs. 

And then, between the years of 1990 to 2010, the internet and technology played their role in advancing resumes. Technology companies at that time began to produce the first word processors that brought greater consistency to CV content. The commercial World Wide Web formed resources and directories for employers and employees to connect. And in 2013, LinkedIn launches a new web tool for job networking, thus popularising the trend of uploading online CVs. 

CV update

Resumes evolve from time-to-time, not only about the look but also the content. Before there were AI and advanced technology like today, resume would be simpler to create. But now, there are two rules for job seekers if they want to get shortlisted. Besides a creative and interesting display, the content of your CV such as experience or education must be more personal and be able to be read by both man and machine.

1. More personal CV

Hays CEO, Alistair Cox said that the nature of work is changing so should the nature of the CV. A well-written and well-structured CV can open doors for anyone who always thought would remain firmly closed. It can start conversations with people you never thought you’d ever be able to get airtime with. Importantly, a CV should remain a key tool in helping you land an interview for the job of your dreams. Thus, you should not be afraid to create a more personal CV than just a mere description of your experience. A CV should be your opportunity to communicate what you are passionate about and what drives you in your career.

2. Readable CV for human and machine

The second thing to remember is that technology is driving a lot of change in workplaces, including selection process of potential candidates. CVs are increasingly assessed not only by humans but machines too. Hence, you should be sure that your CV does include all the relevant keywords with job position you applied. Simple tips for you: 1) keep the format simple, 2) use correct keywords, and 3) avoid spelling mistakes. (Read here for more information to get your CV shortlisted by machine)

Read also: 5 Reliable & FREE Platforms to Craft Professional-Looking Resumes

Top 10+ Keywords to Create an Eye-catching CV

Curriculum vitae, which also means “the course of your life” in Latin, is the first impression employers would know from you before meeting you in person. It goes without saying that an attractive CV could boost your chances of landing the position you desire. Therefore, it is worth to spend time and effort to design and enhance your professional presentation through a well-crafted CV.

See also: Top 10 User-Friendly Job Search Apps Every Jobseeker Should Possess

In creating a CV, however, you cannot use poorly-arranged phrases or words as this will make it difficult to sell yourself. Remember, employers will judge you the way you express yourself through written words so you should tailor your specifications to the job you are applying and include skills, qualifications, and experience which are most suited to the job. You should also write an accurate and concise CV – don’t use too much space, 2 to 3 pages of CV should be enough. More importantly, you should use a powerful and positive language. Therefore, you should highlight your skills, expertise, and value with the right keywords to grab better attention of your prospective employer. Here goes the keyword list.

For describing personal attributes

personal attribute use

For describing job-related experiences  

job related use

Note: All the keywords must be followed by proofs to convince employers better. For instance, instead of saying “I was awarded to be an excellent digital marketer”, you should say “I managed to get 250 percent revenue in one year, thusly I was awarded to be an excellent digital marketer.”

Combination keywords (adverb)

additional

How to use those keywords

As you already pocket some keywords to create a CV, you need to know how to use them in order to create an eye-catching one. Here is a piece of simple advice for you.

Instead of writing in bullet point such as,

  • Completed IT project within 1 week
  • Enhanced IT system

you should write creatively and in a more interesting way by exploring a bit about your expertise. For example:

“I developed a new IT system and managed to complete it in a short time. The system now ….” Or you can say “I effectively managed to complete a new IT system only within 2 weeks it which the system is now operating across businesses.”

Takeaways

You should keep in mind that the way you express yourself in a piece of good-created CV matters. Thusly, be as informative and positive as you can, enhance the reader’s (employer) understanding of how valuable you can be within an organisation. Last but not least, as what Thoreau said: “go confidently in the direction of your dreams” – so be confident with whatever you are pursuing now and put this confidence on the CV. 

Read also: Do’s and Dont’s for Creating Catchy Resume

If you are an artist, photographer, graphic designer, art director, or other professionals in the creative industry, you must have understood the importance of crafting an appealing resume when applying for a job. Chances are, you are not the only candidate who are interested in joining the creative team in your dream company. You will find many rival candidates to get that position. Then what is the key to grab the hiring manager’s attention – even before meeting him in person?

One of the tricks to be noticed by your dream employer is to create a unique resume. You have to stand out from the crowd and demonstrate your creativity by designing a distinctive resume. By creating a creative resume, you will show that you can think out-of-the-box and this can be one of the employer’s consideration to hire you. Therefore, sending a creative resume will help you catch your future employer’s eye and beat other applicants.

A collaboration between great content and well-designed resume is the key for an attractive application. Here are some key principles in creating a creative resume :

Write down a great content

First of all, what you need to pay attention in creating a resume is the content itself. This includes how you define yourself, your career goals and what can you offer to the company. Basically, crucial things you need to write down on your resume is your personal profile, job experience, a list of your publication or award, as well as professional skills – both technical or soft skill.

However, a great content is not enough, as you have to remember that your creative resume should represent your real work ethics as well. If you state that you are an innovative individual on your resume, then you have to able to demonstrate and implement it when you get the job. Therefore, before writing a creative resume you have to keep in mind that you have to use your creativity for the sake of achieving the final goal, which is to help the company succeed.

Dig your creative inspiration

Everyone owns different method to gain inspiration, including in crafting a creative resume. If you have no idea where to start, you can look for an inspiration by digging various creative resumes available on the internet. For example, you might want to look at Jeanne Hwang resume on Pinterest and follow her example to land your dream job.

Make an attractive template

Your choice of fonts and colors used for your resume will definitely show your sense of art. For creative company, it becomes one of crucial considerations in hiring new employees, especially if you are applying for an art director or graphic designer position. When making the layout, you should keep the design simple, readable, and catchy by maximizing the space on your resume.

A unique presentation

Your creative skill can also be seen from how you print out your resume. Instead of handing out a boring piece of resume paper, you can create a unique resume presentation. For example, you can make it in 3D model or with kirigami method. The key is to make it distinctive from other resumes and this will value-add your creative resume.

 

 

9426b528d58508553b1bb28ab8ef9a041fe0d7d29f19a59f200335082b83a30f

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

However, you have to know when to keep it simple, as it has to fit with the company’s nature. For example, you can let your imagination free and create a really unique resume for young-spirited startup, but you cannot do that much with more established formal enterprise.

Attach your portfolio

Proof your skills and capability by attaching your portfolio on your application. You might want to add it on some data storage devices such as DVD or CD’s and include it on your resume. Portfolio showcases your career summary, list of accomplishments, samples of your work, or some award that you have achieved.

Besides the traditional portfolio, you can also develop online web-based portfolio. You can choose an online platform that can  be used for your portfolio database, such as Squarespace, Viewbook, Fabrik, Format, and many more.

Next read :How to Tell: Are You in the Wrong Career, or Just Lazy?