3 Reasons Why Showcasing Your Personality during Job Interview is Essential

Being a suitable job candidate for a specific position in a company requires more than a well-written CV. While having confidence could be one of the biggest advantages to being a candidate of choice, it might not be enough to secure a job offer. Job seekers must go beyond just well-written resumes by showcasing their personality.

See also: 4 Tips to Find a Job that Fits and Suits You

According to Heckman et al., personality has been a scientifically-proven predictor of job performance and assessing a candidate’s behavioural tendencies in a work environment. This allows recruiters to determine whether a candidate will be a top performer and if he/she will fit the culture of the company. Recruiter Experts cited there are three more advantages for job seekers when showcasing their personality during an interview: 

1- Your personality is a success indicator 

Personality is the driving force behind how one thinks, feels, acts, adapts and works. The stories you share in a job interview regarding past experiences can be an indicator of how you will deal with adversity and opportunity. Potential employers want a glimpse into your future successes and failures. Often, the simplest indicator is your personality. 

2- Skills can be taught, personality cannot 

More and more companies are realising that skills and knowledge can be gained on the job. However, personality is hardwired. If you come to the table with a personality that matches with a company’s culture, other technical skills can be learned over time. 

3- Culture is king 

Your personality can indicate that you will build good culture in a company which will create a healthy place to work, not only for yourself but also for others. 

Using insights from personality assessments and your past experiences to really understand what an ideal environment looks like will lead you to the right career path. Remember, it needs to be a fit on both sides. There is no use in denying your personality. 

Read also: 10 Suitable Jobs for YOU Who are Bad Communicators

Dos & Don'ts when Asking Questions to Recruiter

If you, as a candidate, are enthusiastic during an interview, the chance of getting hired is higher. An interview session is a place where you can figure out whether the job and workplace culture is a fit for you. Therefore, don’t hesitate to ask the questions you prepare beforehand to the interviewer.

See also: 6 Phrases to AVOID When Applying for Job and Interview

Here are the dos and don’ts that will help you get the most out of every question you ask: 

DO

  • Ask your most pressing questions first. These could be about the culture, goals of your future team or how performance will be evaluated.
  • Ask probing questions. Consider asking which personality traits are most common among the most successful employees, or what employees enjoy most about working there. 
  • Ask interviewers about their own career paths. For example, ask them how they decided to go into their field, or what steps they took within the company to attain their current position.
  • Ask about challenges. What will make this job difficult? What will you need to overcome?
  • Ask for their contact information and whether you can connect with them for further information.

DON’T

  • Don’t ask questions to sound smart. For example, interrupting the recruiter before he/she finishes their questions, just because you know the better option or better solution to the question asked. 
  • Don’t ask about something you could find online. This might make the recruiter think that you haven’t done your homework well. Remember that searching and researching information about the company before an interview is vital to your interview success. 
  • Don’t be unprofessional. You should limit yourself when asking questions even when the recruiter says that you can ask anything, NEVER ask about personal life, such as marital status, his/her personal salary, etc. 
  • Don’t push. If the hiring manager won’t answer your question, it’s best to leave it alone.

Read also: How to Discuss a Gap Year in an Interview

5 Types of People to Include in Your LIFE Circle

Networking has always been the top ingredient of success. In many cases, having a network will help in your job search, expand your knowledge, and improve your expertise. Yet, networking is not all about growing your list of contacts. You cannot just pick random individuals, ask their email or phone number and add them to your contact list, then contact them when you need help. More than that, networking is all about knowing someone at a deeper level that could help improve yourself as an individual.

With that in mind, it is essential to be selective when making new connections. Why? Because getting in a wrong networking circle could hamper your life. Meanwhile, getting yourself surrounded by the right individuals can give you a boost as you will get advice and feedback from a hand-picked group of strategic advisors who truly tip the scales in your favour. 

See also: 4 Tips to Find a Job that Fits and Suits You

So, who should be in your circle? Here are five types of people to include. 

The advocate 

The advocate individuals know you on a personal level, acts as a trusted sounding board, and likely a close friend or family member. When you ask a question such as “how can my first few jobs line up with my personal values?” to your advocate circle, they can help you by giving true answers because they know your ins and outs. 

The strategic “In” 

The strategic “In” is more like a connection of the outside. They are well-connected individuals, demonstrate a willingness to make connections on your behalf, and likely alumni, past internship advisors, or your professors. When you ask your strategic “In” circle about a new job in X company, they will happily connect you with the current employees of C-suites. 

The subject matter expert 

As the name suggests, subject matter expert networks are those who can offer you superior insight on a specific industry, give you an unbiased opinion, likely an alumni contact, professors, or family members. This circle can widen your skills and knowledge about the outside worlds, especially the professional ones. In addition, they can give you advice on how to develop yourself and always push you to grow. Usually, these people are those who will make you uncomfortable in your comfort zone. 

The financial guru 

We know that money is one of the most powerful weapons in today’s industry and being financially illiterate can usher you to more difficulties, such as debt, loan, credit, etc. That is one of the reasons why many employees demand financial programs within their organisations. In this case, you should find one network who can be a financial guru. This network is usually those who live to observe stocks and might work around numbers daily. They can be anyone, like your family member, advocates, friends, or project buddy. 

The social butterfly 

Last but not least, the social butterfly individual is someone who can encourage you to connect with others. They are very person-centred and love being the centre of attention. Having one or two social butterflies around will help you get out of your comfort zone and can teach you how to network better. This is especially good for a very introverted or shy individual. 

Read also: 10 Suitable Jobs for YOU Who are Bad Communicators 

Tips to Find a Job that Fits and Suits You 

Chester Elton, an executive coach and author, said that too many people (job seekers) get caught up in the company’s reputation and brand. The truth is, working in a high-value company is not always a good fit for everyone. Elton suggested that if job seekers want to find a job that fits their personality, they should question more about whether their own brand and personality align with the company values, not their reputation or brand. 

Here are 4 tips from Elton for job seekers who yearn to work in a job that suits and fits them. 

1- Create a mentor network 

Having a mentor network is not only a good place to get advice, but also where you can turn to when it’s time to find a new job. You can include a mix of friends, family, classmates, professors and other advisors in your network. As your professional and personal networks expand, make sure to connect with people both in-person and online to develop a mentor network that is right for you. You should also expand your circle and select a diverse network. Be proactive about who you choose as a mentor because different people can be helpful at various stages of your career. 

See also: 10 Suitable Jobs for YOU Who are Bad Communicators 

2- Take a personality assessment 

Your personality is your biggest asset. It can certainly tip the scale in your favour during an interview process. You can use the assessment result of the personality test to target companies and roles that match your values and personality, thus you can work in a field that you enjoy the most. Here is one of the best and free personality tests you can try. 

3- Research company culture 

Matching your value to a company is key to success. When the company culture aligns with your needs and values as an employee, you will likely have better performance, engagement, and better teamwork organisation. Company culture is also the key to your own wellbeing, thus keep in mind to conduct research on the culture of the firm you want to work at. 

4- Get out fast if it does not fit 

While your first job is important, do not be afraid to make a change if it does not work as you expected. You should be your biggest advocate and adviser because a job that irritates you will only result negatively to your own personal and professional life. For instance, if you stay longer in a job that you do not enjoy, your stress level might increase significantly. Consequently, not only will you have lower productivity, but it will also affect the relationship with the people around you. Another alternative, you can speak to your manager about reshaping the position and if it does not work, you might need to seek a new opportunity elsewhere. 

Read also: Pros and Cons of Working in the Journalism Industry 

Pros and Cons of Working in the Journalism Industry 

Every profession has its own pros and cons, including those working in the journalism industry. As one of the oldest professions in the world, journalism has changed monumentally owing to a staggering growth of technology. This means that the skeletal structure of this career remains the same, yet the responsibility and the view might differ. Compelling storytelling and fact-based are still its strongest pillar, however.

See also: Job Search Tips in Time of Crisis 

So, if you are interested in joining this industry, you better aid yourself with this information of working as a journalist. 

Pros of being a journalist 

  • In journalism, you are working with ever-changing expectations. For example, you can work in a very confidential matter but the next day, you might be asked to cover funny nerve-wracking news. 
  • You will always have a new challenge and demand, thus this job is great for you who can work under pressure. 
  • You get to meet and talk to a variety of people from all walks of life. You might also have a chance to cover and interview highly influential people like a minister. 
  • Your name will be published in print and on websites. This is a great way for you who seek professional identity. 
  • Lastly, you have a better chance to be invited to cover various events, such as theatre performance or restaurant meal reviews for FREE. 

Cons of being a journalist 

  • Whilst the job is challenging, this role is among the lowest salary rate. Unless you reach the highest and most popular level of a journalist, do not expect a fat paycheck. Reported by payscale, an average annual salary of a journalist is $40,839 with an hourly rate of $14.81. However, if you have editing skills, you can expect a slightly higher salary. Yet, even with years of experience (5-9 years) in journalism, the average annual salary is $44,384. 
  • Being a journalist is also a long and often unsociable journey which might demand you to work on weekends and public holidays. 
  • As a journalist, you have a greater risk of death or injury for covering a riot, war zone or other violent disturbance. 
  • Lastly, the peril of being a journalist is you might be blamed for bad news or being seen as the enemy by members of the public when covering sensitive news or events.

Read also: 10 Suitable Jobs for YOU Who are Bad Communicators

10 Suitable Jobs for YOU Who are Bad Communicators 

Everyone has their own characteristics, skills, and preferences. Some people love crowded places, parties, and to be the centre of attention. Owing to their good communication skills, such people might find it relatively easy to get a job and maintain social status. Meanwhile, some others prefer to spend time alone, away from crowded places, and maintain a low-key life. Generally, these people would love to work in a quiet place since they don’t like to be involved in small talks and are not good communicators.

Which one are you? If you belong to the second group and are currently looking for a job that does not require much talking or good communication skills, here are 10 jobs that require low communication skills. 

See also: Job Search Tips in Time of Crisis 

Note: All the salary cited in this article is calculated by Payscale. Your salary can be lower or higher depending on your skills, education, and job experiences. 

  1. Locomotive engineers 

Do you like trains? If you like trains and have bad communication skills, this job will be perfect. This job requires zero speaking duties and you do not need to deal with a lot of people unless you need to, such as co-workers to report on some important stuff. 

The average salary for this job is $92,321 annually with bonuses and profit sharing. 

  1. Forest fire lookout (tower watcher) 

Working with less than 5 people. Sit and watch nature. Sometimes, you can even hear the birds chirping. What a dream job for someone who loves serenity and nature. Being a tower watcher requires far less communicating with others but you need to have high alertness.  

The average salary for this job is $41,067 annually. 

  1. Freelancer 

If you have some skills but do not want to work in the cubicle office, this will be perfect for you. Although you might be required to communicate with your clients, working as a freelancer gives you more freedom in terms of flexible hours and you can choose with whom you want to work with. 

The average salary for this job depends on the type of freelance job you do. Generally, a freelance writer is paid $24.07 hourly, while a freelance consultant is at an average $30.52 hourly pay rates. 

  1. Quality Assurance tester

Quality Assurance (QA) tester is a fun work to do that does not require much talking. Basically, you are responsible for playing video games, applications or other projects and write reports about it, such as if there are any bugs or glitches. 

The average salary for this job is $55,520 annually with bonuses and profit sharing. 

  1. Mail delivery service  

Although you have to walk or drive a long road, this job is still worth it for those who love to work alone with no boss looking over your shoulder. But there might be occasional customer contact that you must handle. This should not discourage you from taking the job if you are keen to work as a delivery service person. 

The average salary for this job is $60,000 annually.

  1. Editor 

You will work with a deadline but not around many people. This job also requires far less communication with others. You can be an editor for online publishers like Kindle Unlimited or you can edit papers submitted for research journals. You do not need to know the subjects. All you need is excellent target language skills (English, Portuguese, Spanish, etc.) 

The average salary for this job is $52,058 annually with bonuses, profit sharing, and commission.

  1. Night security 

If you are a night owl, you can be night security. Watch over dangers and enjoy the breeze of nightlife.

The average salary for this job is $12.06 hourly with bonuses, profit sharing, and commission. 

  1. Truckers

Another job that requires almost zero communication is becoming a trucker. You can travel far and drop goods in other cities. Being a trucker, however, will require you to travel a lot and you need to be physically and emotionally ready for the long trips. The good part is you can do the trip with your dog or your best friends to make it less lonely. 

A commercial truck driver can make $19.75 per hour with bonuses, profit sharing, and commission. 

  1. Podiatrists 

This job is responsible for diagnosing and treating a disease of the foot. Working in this job requires less communication but you might need to create a report in writing form. 

The average salary for this job is $130,142 annually with bonuses, profit sharing, and commission. 

  1. Database administrator 

The nature of this work largely focuses on an in-house job. Making communication with outsiders and public speaking is unimportant to this work. Work responsibilities include administering and managing computer databases. 

The average salary for this job is $73,765 annually with bonuses, profit sharing, and commission. 

Read also: 10+ Suitable Careers for Psychology Graduates 

How to Land Coding Job When You Have NO Experience

We often hear people say, “You need a job to get experience, but you also need experience to get a job”. This is true in most cases since recruiters often prefer hiring those who are experienced in their field. According to the NACE Job Outlook survey, nearly all (91 percent) employers said they prefer their candidates to have work experience, and 65 percent of the total group indicated that they prefer their candidates to have relevant work experience. In addition, as far as how a graduate’s work experience was gained, more than half of the survey respondents prefer that it comes from an internship or co-op. 

The good thing is, the programming field is so broad that you can even start your job search with no job experience in a big co-op or internship. However, there are two requirements you should meet here: First, you need to find an employer who is willing to hire coders or programmers who have a little less experience. Why “little less”? Because the second requirement is that you need to upskill your skills by doing some gig work. 

What is gig work? 

In a simple term, gig is a freelance job where a person works for themselves. This is different from freelancing because gig jobs do not need to sign a contract with a company. Gig workers are completely self-employed. 

By doing gig work, you can fill a special gap in the software engineering industry. This typically takes on jobs that are too small, too specialised, or too experimental to warrant hiring a full-time employee. Therefore, employers usually turn to gig-freelancers when they need to get a temporary job done. 

See also: 6 High Paying Jobs that Allow You to Work from Home

Why should you do gig jobs? 

Doing gig jobs will not give you full perks and benefits like full-time employees. You will not receive benefits, 401K pension, huge paycheck or even job security. So, why still doing this? Wouldn’t it better to stick with a job hunt? 

Gigs are usually small and only require a few hours or a week to finish a project as employers usually do not want to hire gig freelancers for a long time. Yet, there are some employers who will use your service on repeat if you are proven to have the ability to meet their expectations. The work also requires less experience to complete. 

Gigs can also give you an opportunity to work for a lot of different people and on a lot of different projects. This is a great opportunity to do some exploration to find out what you truly like, whether it would be coding audio players, games, live streaming or video conferencing, etc. 

In short, employers do not have long-term commitments between you and them. No employee badges are printed, and no HR department should be involved. The job is pretty easy as you can do with less experience. The job will also teach you how to build trust, relationships, and meet the client’s expectations. All of these will help your job search easier. 

Who will hire gig-workers then? 

Your clients can range from entrepreneurs or intrapreneurs who are looking to build a proof of concept for an idea to individuals who have programming problems. These individuals usually have a low budget to start hiring experienced workers, thus, they turn to gig freelancers. 

How to start? 

Gig jobs are promising but there are a few things you should pay attention to if you want your gigs run smoothly. 

  • Find the right marketplace 

There are numerous gig markets out there. If you register to the wrong one, it will be tough for you to get the right clients. Typically, there are three niche markets: geographical focus, technological focus, and problem-space focus. These three are good to start, yet each of them has its own advantage for you. 

  • Geographical focus is usually built for local communities, meaning you can find entrepreneurs or clients in your local communities. You can easily meet them around your state. 
  • Technological focus focuses on particular technologies. This is good for you if you have some experience or knowledge about a broad range of technology. 
  • Problem-space focus is a targeted gig which can be broken down into a broad of freelancing sites, such as software marketplace, writer marketplace, or developer marketplace. 
  • Apply for the gigs 

After targeting your niche, it is time to start the search. First, you need to apply to freelance websites such as upwork.com or freelance.com. Then, have a conversation with an employer and convince them that you can solve their problem. You might be required to send an email or fill a form but it does not weigh more as long as you can build a trusted communication with your targeted employer. 

In your conversation, it is vital to let them know that you can solve their problem, how many hours or long it will take to solve it, and why you are a good match for them. You can include a few links to your past projects that are similar to what the client looks for. 

But I am new and I have no similar project, what should I do? If you have this question, it should not stop you. Instead, you can take this as your advantage by letting the client know that you are new to the freelancing world so that is why your rate is so low. You can also tell them that you need the project to build up a good portfolio. However, emphasise that even if you are new, you have a lot of experience in the particular industry. Remember your past experience when you help your friends or build a project with your friends, etc. 

  • Follow up 

Last but not least, always have a follow-up conversation with your clients. Whether it is about a new project or just want to get in touch with them for future collaboration. The follow up is the most essential that helps you build a wider relationship with like-minded people. 

Read also: If You Like Travelling, These Jobs ARE For You

Are You a Boring Job Applicant? 

Wake up, have breakfast, open a laptop, find a job in an online job platform, click apply, eat lunch, go out, go home, maybe open social media for a while, sleep, REPEAT. You don’t even bother to rewrite your job resume for a different job application and, probably, you use a simple bullet writing technique in your resume. If this sounds pretty much like you, please stop. Why? Because employers are not willing to hire such sluggish, effortless job seekers. 

Amanda Lannert, CEO of Jellyvision, said in an interview that the least a job seeker can do is to stop being “boring”. She explained that recruiters are often bored because people play safe. They (job seekers) commodify themselves into just a bullet-point list of skills and experience. This might look neat but it is one of the most boring things to read. 

See also: Most Important Networking Tips for Jobseekers

Here are other reasons why you can be a boring job applicant. You better avoid it! 

You do nothing besides job search 

It is understandable that you want to get a job as soon as possible, but sitting in front of your computer or smartphone all day searching for a job is a big no-no. Why? During an interview, you are going to be asked about your experience. While you can demonstrate that you are active leaders during your university, what will you answer when a recruiter asks, “What do you do in the meantime of your job search”? 

Therefore, go out. Talk to real people. Expand your circle and connection. Having meaningful activities during a job search can help you have an interesting discussion during your interview session which might catch recruiter’s attention and intention of hiring you. 

You focus too much on writing a boring resume

Crafting an interesting resume is important, especially if you know that the company you are applying to uses Applicant Tracking System (ATS). Resume with the right format and keywords will do the job. However, your resume can only contain your work experience, education, skills, or achievements – which tells so little about you, as a person. 

In this case, Lannert advised you to focus on the cover letter and not resume. There is nothing more refreshing than seeing someone who takes a chance to be incredibly human in cover letter or an outreach, to put themselves forward, she added. This will definitely catch recruiter’s attention as companies today need more empathetic and down-to-earth people. 

Tips: Use your own language. Use words that are not stiff or business jargon-y, especially words you usually find in the google site template. 

You do not go the extra mile 

Your cover letter and resume are top-notch so you are offered a job interview. You prepare for the interview and write some questions you want to ask a recruiter. However, during the interview, you are too focused on “selling” and “telling”. 

Telling and selling your skills are good, but showing them is extraordinary. Seeing your effort in preparing a presentation of how valuable your skills are or how great your ideas will improve the company’s business will be more appreciated. Besides, people are more convinced when you show them, instead of just telling them. 

Read also: 15 Minutes Before Interview : Absolutely Important For Job seekers!

Why and How to Make Industry Transition? 

Ameera loves reading and feels fortunate to have a job that actually engaged her interest. She works as a librarian in her town’s public library. She is passionate about doing her job as it allows her to do what she loves while contributing to the community by sharing and teaching people who visit the library.

However, over the last few years, the funding to the library has decreased, leading to its inability to afford new reading materials for readers. Ameera finds the job no longer makes her feel content because everything changes since the funding was cut. Then, she starts wondering if there is an opportunity to do similar works somewhere else, where resources are not so constrained. After thinking it over, Ameera decides to make an industry transition. 

What is and why industry transition? 

Industry transition, or industry switch, refers to going from your current industry to a new one. Industry transition is different from a career change that often requires you to gain new skills and adapt to a completely new environment. When you do an industry change, you will gain new skillsets and experience working in a new environment. 

Oftentimes, individuals will make industry transition to look for a new challenge that still requires their current skillset. Industry change can also be a perfect step to grow professionally as you are able to strengthen your current skills so you can hone your expertise. Industry change is also good to help keep your job satisfaction. 

See also: 10+ List of Jobs for Graduates with English Degree 

So are you interested in doing industry transition? If yes, you should know that the road to the transition is not easy. Albeit it is less dramatic than a career change, you still need a lot of to-dos. Here are NTUC tricks to help you achieve a successful industry transition. 

Trick 1 – Know your why(s) 

Look within yourself why you need to make an industry switch. Is it because your department has declined? Is it because you want to gain more experience by collaborating with a new team? Is it because your target industry has better career prospects? When you understand your why(s), you can better identify which industry is the best for you to grow professionally, and whether you really need the switch or not. Your reasons will also help you stay motivated throughout the change. 

Trick 2 – Research the target industry 

After that, learn about the industry you want to transition into. Does the industry have what you need and want? Does the industry suit your work style? Does the industry align with your long-term career goals? 

You can go to the industry website and search for skill framework. Or, you might ask the industry’s head to provide you with the framework. The skill framework can give you information on sectors, employment landscape, workforce profiles, career pathways, wage trends, desired skillset, and a list of training programmes. 

Trick 3 – Expand your network 

A transition is never easy, especially if this is your first industry transition. Thus, it is best for you to get a person who can guide you and know the in and out of an industry transition. Attending network events could help you meet industry insiders. When you have successfully built a relationship with the target industry insiders, it will be easier for you to find out what kind of projects they are working on, skills needed for the job, current challenges that are being faced in the industry, the lingo they use, and even hidden job opportunities. All of these can ensure your success when you decide to change between your current industry to another. 

Trick 4 – Maximise courses and support programmes available online or from current employer 

Generally, industry change will require you to gain up-to-date skills that align with the target industry. Thus, keep improving, upskilling, and attending classes or courses to gain your credibility. If possible, seek an opportunity which gives certification as it can play as a crucial proof for recruiters or hiring managers when you make the transition. 

Read also: 6 High Paying Jobs that Allow You to Work from Home

6 Phrases to AVOID When Applying for Job and Interview 

Obviously, every job seeker’s ultimate goal is to land a job as soon as possible. Before getting employed, however, you will have to go through some stages, from resume screening to interview meetings to finally job contract signing. All the process could be daunting and tricky from time to time, especially when you come unprepared.

Therefore, be mindful when writing your resume and do your homework before coming to the job interview. What else to pay attention to? In this article, we share 6 phrases you need to avoid during a job search and interview. These phrases could downgrade your credibility as a potential candidate. Check it out!

1. Dear Sir/Madam

What’s wrong with this phrase? While this conventional opening phrase has always been widely used that it seems normal, the phrase might not be suitable to use especially when applying for a startup company. A startup company is a place where most of its workers are millennials and like a personal touch. Therefore, saying dear sir or madame just does not sound right. 

What to say instead? In addressing a person, it is better to say “Dear (founder’s name/recruiter’s name/startup name team)”. Or, to make it sound more personal, you can say Hello (startup name) team. 

2. This is a great opportunity for me or I have a great interest in this role

You would not consider applying for a job in the company if the role is not your interest or the opportunity does not align with your own needs. Thus, when the recruiter asks you why they should hire you, try to find another way to express your reasons. 

What to say instead? There is a better way to answer instead of just repeating the “great opportunity” which is “Here is why I am prepared for this role…” or “I am always prepared to be in this role with (demonstrate your achievement or skills)”. 

See also: Passion versus Skill: What Comes First in a Job Search?

3. Well, my last employer was kind of okay  

Saying “Well..” with a low tone or high tone might indicate something bad or laziness. Sure, you do not want the recruiter to perceive you as a negative chatter. Saying “kind of okay” does not demonstrate well why you quit your job. A recruiter wants to hear from you why you choose another employment albeit the recruiter can do a background check and call your past employer. This is done to measure your honesty. 

What to say instead? Avoid the “well” words and explain how your employer treats you in the past. As best as possible, do not mention the negative reason about your former employer and in the last statement you can add, “I believe I am better suited to work in an organisation that has a strong commitment to mentoring executives as well as fostering career development and growth.” 

4. Perfectionism 

Whether being a perfectionist is your greatest asset or weakness, it is better to avoid the word all at once. Why? Because the word tells a little about you and it is overly rehearsed cliche, wrote The Muse

What to say instead? There are some alternative, however, if you are a real perfectionist. For example, you could say, “I am too attached sometimes with little details which can distract me from the ultimate goal” or “I feel myself always caught up in trivia that hinder me to achieve more.” 

5. I want better work-life balance 

Work-life balance has always become employees’ dream. However, this will be a not-so-good impression if you are only applying to get a better work-life balance. Barry Dexler, an expert interview coach, told CNBC that companies really do not care about your work-life balance. Albeit it sounds cynical, all employer truly wants to hear that you are ready to work and that you will work around the clock if needed. 

What to say instead? Instead of emphasising your thirst for work-life balance, you can tell the recruiter, “I am ready for the challenges ahead.” In addition, show previous experience or challenges that you have overcome to support your statement. 

6. I have no question, thank you 

The “thank you” part is acceptable but the “I have no question” part is a big no-no. Not having any questions for the interviewer basically says that you are not interested enough to learn. This indicates that you are not prepared enough for the interview. 

What to say instead? Do not tell that you have plenty of questions too. Just utter “Yes, I have a question/questions” and ask. What to ask? Click here to find out smart and insightful questions to ask at the end of your interview. 

Read also: Should You Bring Notes to An Interview? Dos and Don’ts