Love or hate your company? We are giving away a $5 McDonald’s Voucher to the first 100 Job Review contributors. Help others get an inside look at your current/former employer.

3 Simple Steps to Winning:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read further for detailed steps to winning:

1)      Post a review of your company. (Share what you like/dislike about your former/current employer!)

*2)      In the title of your review, type hashtag followed by marcontest (#marcontest)* followed by a one-liner about how you feel about your job.

3)      Click “Next” to submit Review. You will have to create an account or login for the post to be recorded.

 Giveaway Details[more…]:

-          Only to the first 100 valid reviews (please read the guidelines below for what defines a valid review). Please provide as much detail as possible!

-          Title of review must contain #marcontest

-          Multiple reviews are allowed only for experiences from different companies/jobs. Double entries for the same job in the same company is not allowed.

-          Contest period: 6th March 2013 (Wednesday), 00:00 to 22th March 2013 (Friday), 23:59 (GMT +8)

-          First 100 Contributors will be notified by email (that was used for login) on 26th March 2013 (Tuesday), 12:00.

-          Winners will have to reply to the email by 27st March 2013, 23:59 with full name and address. Voucher will be forfeited if there is no reply.

-          Vouchers will be mailed out on 29th March 2013

-          Any enquiries, please write to contact@jobiness.com

___________________________________________________________________________________________

 For some inspiration, here are some recent reviews from the community:

Barclays Capital (Former Employee)

“Very London driven but not a global bank yet.”

 

Singapore Airlines (Former Employee)

“Senior management are not taking in ideas.”

 

American Express (Current Employee)

“Great career progression and benefits”      

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

 Guidelines for Job Review

  • We maintain the highest levels of quality control to protect our members from fake/misleading entries.
  • All entries are examined and certified to be authentic before being posted onto this site. Any suspicious entries will be immediately investigated and action taken as necessary.

The following is prohibited from posting on the site;

-          Slang words or obscenities

-          Personal attacks or insults (to persons, positions or institutions)

-          Information which is irrelevant or not useful to members

-          Comments that are offensive or discriminatory

-          Violations of privacy

-          Comments written entirely in capital letters, are unintelligible or incoherent

 

Remember – your contribution is anonymous and you can even post if you work at a small company or you’re the only one with your job title.

 

A lot of people think that the interview (and their killer interview questions) is the most terrifying part of their job search. I beg to differ – I think that the most nerve-wrecking part about the job search process is sending out your applications, and then having to sit back and wait for replies. Whenever I send out applications for job openings, I find myself unwittingly checking my email once every 3 hours, and I can’t seem to be able to wholeheartedly focus on anything else. Within 2-3 days, I find myself shooting out emails “checking back on the status of my applications”. [more…]

 

With unemployment looming – and especially after the long, arduous process of filling out online applications, resumes, beautifying portfolios, and networking furiously – one can hardly be faulted for pouncing on every career opportunity and holding on to it for dear life.

 

At the end of the day, in order to spare yourself the torture, it might be better to get to the root of the problem instead of biting your nails. You know what they say: Know your enemy and know yourself, and you can win a hundred battles. In this case, all you need to do is win one battle to find yourself gainfully employed. Here are the top 3 reasons why you never hear back after applying for a job – and what to do to salvage the situation:

 

1)      Your application never reached the eyes of the hiring manager.

In 2012, The Wall Street Journal published a startling piece of statistic: Human eyes may never read as many as 25 out of a 100 job applications, because most resumes are missing the keywords that the recruiting software used by the companies scan and rank. Of course, if your resume does not even reach the eyes of the hiring manager, he or she will not even know you exist.

The simply remedy: Make sure that your resume has the right keywords that correspond with the job opening that you are applying for. At the same time, don’t get too trigger-happy with the keywords, or your resume will not appear readable or coherent even if it is read.

 

2)      You were never qualified for the job opening to begin with.

Make no mistake – when a company puts up a job vacancy looking for a copywriter with 5-7 years of experience, and your resume shows that you have extensive experience in the area of web development, you can certainly be sure that you will not get called up. Many people do “try their luck” by attempting to market themselves as a jack-of-all-trades who can handle any job opening. Well, hiring managers are definitely not looking for someone who might be able to do the job eventually. They want results from the moment the employee steps in the door – and you don’t fill the bill.

Solution? Only apply for job vacancies that you qualify for. If you are looking to explore new areas, don’t bother applying for senior positions in that industry – aim for an internship or even junior positions.

 

3)      Your online profiles were researched, and the hiring manager did not like what he/she saw.

Gone are the days where your social life was off-limits to your professional life. In fact, you can be sure that the hiring manager is going to browse through your collection of partying photos on Facebook and the ugly comments you made about your in-laws on Twitter. Now, that sure won’t make a good impression on you, nor help your chances for nailing that job opening – even if your resume is absolutely glowing.

To resolve such pesky online trouble, start an extensive spring-cleaning campaign on all your online profiles. Start by running a simple Google search on your name, and ensure that all the searches that relate to you look squeaky clean. Ensure that how you present yourself on your social networks is respectable. Don’t go overboard though – companies want employees with personality as well.

 

 Related Article: 4 must-know features on LinkedIn

 

4)      You waited… But never did follow-up.

After sending out a ton of applications, it’s easy to get utterly demoralized and not even bother to check back with the hiring manager with regards to your application status. Taking this step, however, shows him/her that you are serious and very interested in the job opening.

Keep it cool – follow up with a phone call or an email a week or two after to demonstrate your interest and check whether your materials have been received. Hiring managers are usually drowning in a flood of applications, so don’t give up hope so easily.

 

5)      The hiring manager isn’t the only way into the company – you forgot the existing employees!

The corporate world is a world that values connections. If you have a contact in the company who can put in a good word for you, this would definitely magically accelerate your application to the top of the pile. If you don’t, find a way to make a connection – LinkedIn is a fantastic platform to use to see if any of your connections link to someone in the company you are interested in.

Once you’ve found that perfect connection, ask the person out (nicely) and treat him/her to a cup of coffee. Communicate your interest clearly, show that you are the right fit for the company, and you might find yourself on the express route in.

 

 

All in all, don’t waste time feeling sorry for yourself if you don’t hear back from the company. There is always a positive action to take that might land you the job, or even a second chance at expressing your interest and showing your abilities. Do a diagnostic and figure out where it went wrong, and prepare yourself well for the next round.

 

A well-written resignation letter always leaves you with more open doors even after departing from the organization. Additionally, a well-executed and graceful exit letter will give you additional leverage in your future job, whether for networking purposes or as staunch referrers.

 

What are the important aspects an individual has to bear in mind when tendering a resignation?

[more…]Maintain a formal but friendly tone: Your resignation letter should appear as a formal and friendly business letter starting with an initial name like “Dear First Name,” as against “Dear Mr. X,”.
 
Avoid being equivocated: Make it a point to clarify that you’re not ready to accept counter offers by using a clear-cut line like, “I hereby render my resignation letter as effective from (date)”. Ideally, people who are in more senior positions or hold greater responsibilities should give more than 2 weeks’ notice.
 
Be complimentary: The letter has to be highlighted in such a manner that it shows your gratitude towards the organization. You can use lines like, “I cannot thank you enough for all that I have learnt and all the chances kindly bestowed upon me during the past five (it can be less or more) years”.
 
Set the record clean: Since the letter is going to be filed in personal records, you have to pay close attention while presenting the contents of the letter. It is also good practice to mention your accomplishments in it. Taking such a step is necessary as it will put you in a good position in your future endeavor in finding a job. It is also important because there may be a probability that you will have to work with the same HR department staff.

 

“A well-executed and graceful exit letter will give you additional leverage in your future job”

 

 Related Article: How to Turn the Tide during an Interview (When things go Bad)

 

Stay positive: Should an upcoming employer seek to verify your employment history, they might speak with somebody who is aware of your pitfalls and strengths. Ideally, you would want them to see that the last words written by you are “positive, uplifting and thankful”. Even if there are any adverse remarks in your file, the human spirit will be spurred to negate the same, especially if you appear nice and non-threatening on paper.
 
Be supportive: Let your employer understand that you are ready to offer help in the transition, if required, after your previous date of employment. Be enthusiastic to share your telephone number with your last employer and convey your preparedness to field any questions on the job front.

End on a warm note: It would be apt if could end your resignation letter in the following manner: “Dear Hiring Manager, without your able guidance and cooperation, I would not have landed at this job opportunity. I am truly grateful to you and can only hope that my replacement will be as supportive as I was”.  Sign off your letter on a warm note, such as, “Respectfully yours”, or “Warmest regards”.

 

With a warm tone and words of appreciation, you will get to leave with a fuzzy feeling, and at the same time still be remembered by your colleagues in a positive light.

 

 

A well-written resignation letter always leaves you with more open doors even after departing from the organization. Additionally, a well-executed and graceful exit letter will give you additional leverage in your future job, whether for networking purposes or as staunch referrers.

 

What are the important aspects an individual has to bear in mind when tendering a resignation?

[more…]Maintain a formal but friendly tone: Your resignation letter should appear as a formal and friendly business letter starting with an initial name like “Dear First Name,” as against “Dear Mr. X,”.
 
Avoid being equivocated: Make it a point to clarify that you’re not ready to accept counter offers by using a clear-cut line like, “I hereby render my resignation letter as effective from (date)”. Ideally, people who are in more senior positions or hold greater responsibilities should give more than 2 weeks’ notice.
 
Be complimentary: The letter has to be highlighted in such a manner that it shows your gratitude towards the organization. You can use lines like, “I cannot thank you enough for all that I have learnt and all the chances kindly bestowed upon me during the past five (it can be less or more) years”.
 
Set the record clean: Since the letter is going to be filed in personal records, you have to pay close attention while presenting the contents of the letter. It is also good practice to mention your accomplishments in it. Taking such a step is necessary as it will put you in a good position in your future endeavor in finding a job. It is also important because there may be a probability that you will have to work with the same HR department staff.

 

“A well-executed and graceful exit letter will give you additional leverage in your future job”

 

 Related Article: How to Turn the Tide during an Interview (When things go Bad)

 

Stay positive: Should an upcoming employer seek to verify your employment history, they might speak with somebody who is aware of your pitfalls and strengths. Ideally, you would want them to see that the last words written by you are “positive, uplifting and thankful”. Even if there are any adverse remarks in your file, the human spirit will be spurred to negate the same, especially if you appear nice and non-threatening on paper.
 
Be supportive: Let your employer understand that you are ready to offer help in the transition, if required, after your previous date of employment. Be enthusiastic to share your telephone number with your last employer and convey your preparedness to field any questions on the job front.

End on a warm note: It would be apt if could end your resignation letter in the following manner: “Dear Hiring Manager, without your able guidance and cooperation, I would not have landed at this job opportunity. I am truly grateful to you and can only hope that my replacement will be as supportive as I was”.  Sign off your letter on a warm note, such as, “Respectfully yours”, or “Warmest regards”.

 

With a warm tone and words of appreciation, you will get to leave with a fuzzy feeling, and at the same time still be remembered by your colleagues in a positive light.

 

A well-written resignation letter always leaves you with more open doors even after departing from the organization. Additionally, a well-executed and graceful exit letter will give you additional leverage in your future job, whether for networking purposes or as staunch referrers.

 

What are the important aspects an individual has to bear in mind when tendering a resignation?

[more…]Maintain a formal but friendly tone: Your resignation letter should appear as a formal and friendly business letter starting with an initial name like “Dear First Name,” as against “Dear Mr. X,”.
 
Avoid being equivocated: Make it a point to clarify that you’re not ready to accept counter offers by using a clear-cut line like, “I hereby render my resignation letter as effective from (date)”. Ideally, people who are in more senior positions or hold greater responsibilities should give more than 2 weeks’ notice.
 
Be complimentary: The letter has to be highlighted in such a manner that it shows your gratitude towards the organization. You can use lines like, “I cannot thank you enough for all that I have learnt and all the chances kindly bestowed upon me during the past five (it can be less or more) years”.
 
Set the record clean: Since the letter is going to be filed in personal records, you have to pay close attention while presenting the contents of the letter. It is also good practice to mention your accomplishments in it. Taking such a step is necessary as it will put you in a good position in your future endeavor in finding a job. It is also important because there may be a probability that you will have to work with the same HR department staff.

 

“A well-executed and graceful exit letter will give you additional leverage in your future job”

 

 Related Article: How to Turn the Tide during an Interview (When things go Bad)

 

Stay positive: Should an upcoming employer seek to verify your employment history, they might speak with somebody who is aware of your pitfalls and strengths. Ideally, you would want them to see that the last words written by you are “positive, uplifting and thankful”. Even if there are any adverse remarks in your file, the human spirit will be spurred to negate the same, especially if you appear nice and non-threatening on paper.
 
Be supportive: Let your employer understand that you are ready to offer help in the transition, if required, after your previous date of employment. Be enthusiastic to share your telephone number with your last employer and convey your preparedness to field any questions on the job front.

End on a warm note: It would be apt if could end your resignation letter in the following manner: “Dear Hiring Manager, without your able guidance and cooperation, I would not have landed at this job opportunity. I am truly grateful to you and can only hope that my replacement will be as supportive as I was”.  Sign off your letter on a warm note, such as, “Respectfully yours”, or “Warmest regards”.

 

With a warm tone and words of appreciation, you will get to leave with a fuzzy feeling, and at the same time still be remembered by your colleagues in a positive light.

 

A well-written resignation letter always leaves you with more open doors even after departing from the organization. Additionally, a well-executed and graceful exit letter will give you additional leverage in your future job, whether for networking purposes or as staunch referrers.

 

What are the important aspects an individual has to bear in mind when tendering a resignation?

[more…]Maintain a formal but friendly tone: Your resignation letter should appear as a formal and friendly business letter starting with an initial name like “Dear First Name,” as against “Dear Mr. X,”.
 
Avoid being equivocated: Make it a point to clarify that you’re not ready to accept counter offers by using a clear-cut line like, “I hereby render my resignation letter as effective from (date)”. Ideally, people who are in more senior positions or hold greater responsibilities should give more than 2 weeks’ notice.
 
Be complimentary: The letter has to be highlighted in such a manner that it shows your gratitude towards the organization. You can use lines like, “I cannot thank you enough for all that I have learnt and all the chances kindly bestowed upon me during the past five (it can be less or more) years”.
 
Set the record clean: Since the letter is going to be filed in personal records, you have to pay close attention while presenting the contents of the letter. It is also good practice to mention your accomplishments in it. Taking such a step is necessary as it will put you in a good position in your future endeavor in finding a job. It is also important because there may be a probability that you will have to work with the same HR department staff.

 

“A well-executed and graceful exit letter will give you additional leverage in your future job”

 

 Related Article: How to Turn the Tide during an Interview (When things go Bad)

 

Stay positive: Should an upcoming employer seek to verify your employment history, they might speak with somebody who is aware of your pitfalls and strengths. Ideally, you would want them to see that the last words written by you are “positive, uplifting and thankful”. Even if there are any adverse remarks in your file, the human spirit will be spurred to negate the same, especially if you appear nice and non-threatening on paper.
 
Be supportive: Let your employer understand that you are ready to offer help in the transition, if required, after your previous date of employment. Be enthusiastic to share your telephone number with your last employer and convey your preparedness to field any questions on the job front.

End on a warm note: It would be apt if could end your resignation letter in the following manner: “Dear Hiring Manager, without your able guidance and cooperation, I would not have landed at this job opportunity. I am truly grateful to you and can only hope that my replacement will be as supportive as I was”.  Sign off your letter on a warm note, such as, “Respectfully yours”, or “Warmest regards”.

 

With a warm tone and words of appreciation, you will get to leave with a fuzzy feeling, and at the same time still be remembered by your colleagues in a positive light.

 

 

The “firsts” in life are always scary, especially when it comes to the first job interview; nothing can be more daunting. Whether it’s face-to-face or online , the good news is (as a general rule of thumb) if you take simple steps and precautions, you can convert your D-day into one of your best experiences ever. Read on to find some easy and effective tips for job interview. [more…]

Polish your intellect

  1. Research: A valuable research calls for an impressive knowledge about the company, the position you are applying for, and the interviewer. Research the company’s profile, achievements, and background. Know as much about the company as feasible. You should always be prepared to talk in depth about the organization, industry, and the position you are applying for. This will certainly give you an edge over the other candidates. Also, try learning your interviewer’s name and the job position. You may call the company for this purpose.
  2. Anticipate: Based on the research you have done, try anticipating some possible questions for job interview. Start from basic questions such as “why do you need the job”, “what have been your experience in the industry”, and others. Later, move on to other more complex and industry oriented questions. A prior comprehension and expectation of these questions for job interview will help you feel a lot more comfortable during the interview.
  3. Practice: Like any other important task, it is a must to practice for a successful job interview. Practice giving complete and concise answers with appropriate terminology. Ensure that you aren’t speaking too slow or too fast, and state your answers with confidence. You can also start by practicing with a peer in order to obtain feedback in a more relaxed setting, which will allow you to gain greater confidence before subjecting yourself to a less forgiving environment.

Take Command over your body language

Just like a first date, the most vital visual during the interview is you, and a great amount of this “visual you” is conveyed through your body language. Remember, every tiny movement and action of yours is being observed from the moment you enter the room, sit down, interact, and finally go out. Practicing beforehand in the mirror is a great way to hone this skill.

You must maintain a poised and active posture throughout. Also, observe your gestures when you speak.

  • Keep your chin parallel to the floor and spine erect, and make confident moves. Maintain open handed gestures to build trust and rapport with your interviewers.
  • Make meaningful eye contact with one interviewer at a time for 3-6 seconds.
  • Lastly, no matter how stressed or nervous you may feel, give a dazzling, confident smile to put yourself and the interviewer at ease. A real genuine smile will engage your zygomatic muscles that are responsible for bringing laugh lines near the eyes, communicating friendliness and openness.
  • Dress in your best formal way. Choose conservative shades, crisp clothes and minimal accessories. Avoid wearing strong fragrances and keep your hair off your face.

Infuse Self-Confidence

If you are an otherwise grumbling person, keep your thoughts at bay while you are preparing for your interview. Employ a simple mantra of “think well and feel good”. Recall your past achievements. Believe in the positive you. Keep track of small events that are directly proportional to your confidence levels. On the big day itself, ensure that you have done the following:

  • Organize your interview supplies, documents, and make sure to carry extra copies of your CV.
  • Don’t skip a healthy breakfast as a good breakfast improves the functioning of your brain and boosts alertness.
  • Reach at least 15 minutes before the scheduled time. You need to acquaint yourself with the environment to fit into it.
  • Check for bad breath and utilize the additional time to freshen yourself up by using a mouthwash.

By implementing the above stated interview tips in your preparation strategy, you should be able to perform assertively and with greater ease on your interview day.

 

The “firsts” in life are always scary, especially when it comes to the first job interview; nothing can be more daunting. Whether it’s face-to-face or online , the good news is (as a general rule of thumb) if you take simple steps and precautions, you can convert your D-day into one of your best experiences ever. Read on to find some easy and effective tips for job interview. [more…]

Polish your intellect

  1. Research: A valuable research calls for an impressive knowledge about the company, the position you are applying for, and the interviewer. Research the company’s profile, achievements, and background. Know as much about the company as feasible. You should always be prepared to talk in depth about the organization, industry, and the position you are applying for. This will certainly give you an edge over the other candidates. Also, try learning your interviewer’s name and the job position. You may call the company for this purpose.
  2. Anticipate: Based on the research you have done, try anticipating some possible questions for job interview. Start from basic questions such as “why do you need the job”, “what have been your experience in the industry”, and others. Later, move on to other more complex and industry oriented questions. A prior comprehension and expectation of these questions for job interview will help you feel a lot more comfortable during the interview.
  3. Practice: Like any other important task, it is a must to practice for a successful job interview. Practice giving complete and concise answers with appropriate terminology. Ensure that you aren’t speaking too slow or too fast, and state your answers with confidence. You can also start by practicing with a peer in order to obtain feedback in a more relaxed setting, which will allow you to gain greater confidence before subjecting yourself to a less forgiving environment.

Take Command over your body language

Just like a first date, the most vital visual during the interview is you, and a great amount of this “visual you” is conveyed through your body language. Remember, every tiny movement and action of yours is being observed from the moment you enter the room, sit down, interact, and finally go out. Practicing beforehand in the mirror is a great way to hone this skill.

You must maintain a poised and active posture throughout. Also, observe your gestures when you speak.

  • Keep your chin parallel to the floor and spine erect, and make confident moves. Maintain open handed gestures to build trust and rapport with your interviewers.
  • Make meaningful eye contact with one interviewer at a time for 3-6 seconds.
  • Lastly, no matter how stressed or nervous you may feel, give a dazzling, confident smile to put yourself and the interviewer at ease. A real genuine smile will engage your zygomatic muscles that are responsible for bringing laugh lines near the eyes, communicating friendliness and openness.
  • Dress in your best formal way. Choose conservative shades, crisp clothes and minimal accessories. Avoid wearing strong fragrances and keep your hair off your face.

Infuse Self-Confidence

If you are an otherwise grumbling person, keep your thoughts at bay while you are preparing for your interview. Employ a simple mantra of “think well and feel good”. Recall your past achievements. Believe in the positive you. Keep track of small events that are directly proportional to your confidence levels. On the big day itself, ensure that you have done the following:

  • Organize your interview supplies, documents, and make sure to carry extra copies of your CV.
  • Don’t skip a healthy breakfast as a good breakfast improves the functioning of your brain and boosts alertness.
  • Reach at least 15 minutes before the scheduled time. You need to acquaint yourself with the environment to fit into it.
  • Check for bad breath and utilize the additional time to freshen yourself up by using a mouthwash.

By implementing the above stated interview tips in your preparation strategy, you should be able to perform assertively and with greater ease on your interview day.

You’re sitting back in your chair, feeling utterly and completely defeated. Your interviewer sits across from you, his arms akimbo and giving you a gaze that clearly communicates that he is not impressed with your performance so far. The last ten minutes that have passed since the start of the interview felt like an hour long instead. Murphy’s Law has seemed to be the most applicable law of the day thus far.

Have you ever found yourself in such a situation during your job interview? [more…]It is entirely understandable that you would begin to get nervous or agitated, especially in this time of dwindling job vacancies and career opportunities. Fret not – here are a few interview tips that will help you to recover quickly and get the attention of your interviewer back:

 

“Keep Calm, Take a Deep Breath and Re-engage”

 

At a certain point in the job interview, maybe the interviewer lost you and began to zone out in the midst of your rambling. Some tell-tale signs include:

 

Fiddling with his/her iPhone or Blackberry;

Examining his/her fingernails or the surroundings;

Giving you a disapproving and uninterested stare;

Nodding vaguely but not giving you eye contact;

Not responding in appropriate fashion to your stories, or

Simply staring into space and not responding

 

This is certainly bad news – it means that he or she has ascertained that whatever you have delivered so far, in response to the interview questions, are not a good fit to what he or she is looking for. Stop yourself and take a breather. Smile, and re-engage your interviewer again, so you can get back on track.

 

Ask relevant questions: One good way to re-engage your interviewer is to ask him a relevant question about himself/herself or the company. Ask your interviewer how the company culture is like, or how it feels like to work there. By doing so, you will re-emphasize your interest in the company, and also prompt your interviewer to give you more information to use in demonstrating your suitability for the company.

 

Change the topic: Another way to re-engage your interviewer would be to stop what you’re currently talking about, change to another subject, and keep your new story short. If it is evident that what you are currently talking about is boring your interviewer, switching to something else might work in capturing your interviewer back. Bear in mind not to get lost in another long narrative, though – try to be as concise as possible, and ask for your interviewer’s input as much as you can.

 

Take a short break to recover: The worst thing you could possibly do, of course, is to completely freak out and start rambling and going off on wild tangents. If you’re getting a huge case of the jitters, you might even want to request for a brief toilet break – politely. This might or might not work, depending on the interviewer’s patience. If it does, head straight to the toilet and splash your face with cold water. Take long, slow breaths, and gather your thoughts again. Run through what you want to tell the interviewer in your head, and make sure you return looking and feeling more confident. It is far better to take a break and re-group than to push forward in a losing battle.

 

Demonstrate your interest in the job strongly – even if you are under or over qualified: If you chose to interview for a job that you are either under or over qualified for, you must have a very good reason for taking that chance. Make sure you prove it to your interviewer. Demonstrate your interest in the job strongly by displaying your knowledge in the related areas, or by matching the skills that you know you have to the skills that are required of the job for the benefit of the interviewer. Do not expect the interviewer to connect the dots for you – show that you mean business by taking the initiative.

 

In sum, never throw in the towel, even when all seems lost. By taking the above steps, you will be able to take the reins and steer the interview back to a more positive direction that would definitely increase your chances of getting hired.

You have just received the much anticipated phone call from an interested employer for an interview, so what’s next? The thought of attending a job interview can be so nerve-wracking that you may actually lose sleep over it. While thinking positively is certainly one way to psyche yourself up for the interview, it will important to put in some effort and be well-prepared for it.

You may think of it as a dialogue session, where your interviewer is interested to find out more about your education background and past work experiences to see if you are fit for the job. Though this is basically what it is, do not assume a passive role and attend the interview without any preparation. As an interviewee, you need to take responsibility of the outcome of the interview and do your due diligence in your preparation. This interview is an opportunity for you to show your strengths and how they can value add to your potential employer.

Here are five essential tasks that you are encouraged to check off for your preparation: [more…]

1.Anticipate questions

Anticipate the questions (that the interviewer may be asking you. Make a list of questions and practice your responses. Standard interview questions include “Tell me more about yourself”, “Why do you want to work for us?”, “What is your biggest weakness?” and “Why should we hire you over another person?” Get a friend to do a mock interview with you and to rehearse all the possible scenarios and questions. Take a video of the interview, and replay the video to watch yourself. Observe your body language – were you being too fidgety? Or showing a lack of eye contact? Polish your presentation accordingly and work on a smooth delivery.

 

 

2.Revise your résumé and cover letter

The interviewer is very likely to ask you to elaborate on what you have mentioned in your résumé and cover letter. Revising your résumé and cover letter is necessary, especially so when you have sent out different versions for various jobs applications.

 

3.Research on the company

It is important to have some good knowledge of the company that has invited you for the interview. Do some research on the company, find out the company’s culture and understand the challenges that are currently facing the company and industry. Knowing this can help you tune your replies better and where you can contribute your strengths to.

 

 

4.Prepare questions to ask the interviewer

“Do you have any questions for me?” Most, if not all interviewers will ask this question towards the end of the interview. Your questions will communicate how much interest you have in the job. This is also an opportunity for you to find out more information about the job and company. Ask questions to learn more about the industry, company or job related challenges, as well as to clarify the job’s responsibilities. The answers to these questions will help you to be more informed if this is a good place to work before the offer comes in.

 

5.Get your right clothes ready

You do not want to wake up on the day of your interview and find out that you do not have the right attire for the interview. Prepare the right clothes for the interview before the actual day. The first impression is made in than 30 seconds and is decided upon your dressing. Leave a positive impression by looking neat and smart, wearing attire that fits well and is well pressed.

Make the next interview count.

Have you been interviewed recently? We hope you can share with us about it!

 

Reference

http://jobsearch.about.com/od/interviewsnetworking/ss/job-interview.htm
Arlene Bastion, The Book of Jobs: Seeking, Getting, Keeping and… Loving Our Jobs. Published by: Armour Publishing. Year of publication: 2009.

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