Here’s our weekly list of career related resources that you might find useful. Enjoy these reads:

1. 10  Things Really Amazing Bosses Do

There are 10 traits that set amazing bosses apart from good ones. If you are a boss, how do you measure up to these qualities? If you are an employee, an absence or presence of such qualities can make or stifle your career.

2. 26 Time Management Hacks I Wish I’d Known at 20

Here are some practical wisdom on how you ought to manage your work hours. This is our favourite – “More hours doesn’t mean more productivity. Use constraints as opportunities“.

Which is your favourite?

[more…]

3.  Can Beautiful Design Make Your Resume Stand Out?

So this article says it sure does. If an employers take 6 seconds looking at your resume, making your resume to be visually attractive is critical in helping you stand out from that stack of resumes.

4. The 5 Principles Of Happiness At Work

In this TED x video, Vishen, CEO of MindValley shares 5 unconventional approaches to making employees happy, which made his company to be voted as the World’s Greatest Workplace. Some of the ways include the gamification of work, where employees can earn badges and level up, ensuring that employees lead glorious social lives, giving employees a beautiful workplace so that they won’t want to return home, and giving them flexitime so long as they get the work done.

Feel free to email us at contact@jobiness.com if you have any articles or interesting career-related sites that you will like to share.

 

Gone are the days when companies rely solely on job boards and recruitment agencies to recruit talent. Today, social media is becoming part of the recruitment marketing mix as companies start to realise its pros: jobs can be filled faster due to social media’s high usage rate and immediate response time; a larger pool of qualified candidates will know about the openings through social networks; and low cost with high return on investment (ROI) amongst other benefits.

 This is not surprising with the massive growth of social media over the years. 2012 saw a 305% increase in the number of social media users since 2009. More popular sites have attracted hundreds million of users – LinkedIn (150 million), Twitter (300 million) and Facebook (845 million). Today, social media has become a part of our lives and we use it for so many purposes – shopping, networking and searching for jobs (and even love) online!

[more…]

This social media boom has created an opportunity for companies to tap on more channels to increase the visibility of their employment brand online and promote interaction with candidates. What is surprising is while employers see social media as a useful recruitment tool, they are not actively using it to recruit talents according to the 2013 XpertHR survey - only 46% of employers use it.

SEE ALSO: Why Your Employer Branding Matters

How can companies leverage social media for employer branding?

Besides consistent communications of the Employee Value Proposition (EVP) to candidates and employees, it is important that internal and external communications work in tandem to optimise employer branding online. Some suggestions are to:

  • Build online profiles

Create a full company profile which communicates the EVP to candidates. This also serves as an example for employees on the tone, style and content of the company’s social media presence.

  • Support virtual interaction

Use a channel to promote ongoing conversations for candidates to ask questions and connect with employees. This can draw on the passion of employees.

  • Engage in online forums

Employers and employees can contribute to online groups and provide useful information about company, and leverage employee testimonials to make its online presence more genuine for candidates.

  • Encourage employee profiles

Train employees to use social media platforms – build their personal brand and promote the EVP. This sends a strong signal to candidates that employees are proud to endorse their company.

  •  Think about multiple profiles

While this may not work for a smaller company, a larger one may want to consider multiple profile pages such as different job functions or geographical locations to target candidates more precisely.

  • Think before you jump onto the social bandwagon

It is important to have a strategy for social media recruitment – what your company wants to do and how to do it. Here are some points and questions to consider:

  • Set objectives

Be clear about your business, marketing and social media goals. Do you want to drive recruitment, build employer brand awareness or reach new candidates?

  • Understand target audiences

Know the social graphics of your candidates. What are they doing online and who are their social influencers?

  • Validate through social listening

Conduct a market analysis. Do you understand your employer brand presence in the social space? What are your competitors doing online?

  • Define your strategy

Establish resources, roles and stakeholders, and plan for budget. Who is the social strategist and community manager in your company? Do you have funds for headcount, tools, training, development and consulting?

  • Define implementation plan

Select the channels and plan the content. Do you want to use LinkedIn, Facebook and/or YouTube? What are the types of posts? What is the content calendar line-up?

  • Define rules of engagement

Work out disclosure/ethics, social media, community and response policies. Have your employees attended social media training? Do your company and employees know how to response to comments posted in the social media?

  • Establish ongoing measurements

Set quantifiable goals and metrics to monitor. Do you want to raise awareness about your EVP or increase website traffic? How will you track the responses?

Social media will continue to be an employer branding trend in 2013 and it is important that employers leverage on social media to reach the talent pool, as part of the communications strategy. Companies who use only one-way or two-way communications may not be able to reach out effectively and efficiently to candidates and employees. Engaging the target audiences and promoting interactions about the company in the social media can help companies to build trust in the EVP and strengthen their employment brand.

Talent War

In today’s talent war, a strong internal and employer brand can help companies attract and retain top talent and positively impact its business performance.

Companies that are perceived to be attractive employers will find it easier to attract talent as people want to work for popular employers. By communicating about what the work environment is like, companies are also more likely to attract the right talent that fits their organisational culture. More applicants, better candidates and higher offer-acceptance rates are critical for employee attraction in today’s tight labour market.

[more…]

A strong employer branding also goes a long way in engaging employees. By developing consistent internal and external messages about what it is like to work for the company, employer branding creates a stronger corporate culture. An attractive employer creates a positive image in the mind of employees. A company’s reputation is among the factors that potential employees consider when choosing a job. A reputable company is which makes them proud to work for the company and motivates them to stay.

To remain an employer of choice, companies will also implement better management practices such as talent development and performance management programmes that will further enhance talent retention which in turn, reduces recruiting cost and attrition rates.

By hiring and retaining strong talents, companies can grow and maintain a competitive edge. Corporate and employer brands are also interlinked. Like employees who want to work for top employers, customers want to do business with a popular employer. Thus, a good employment brand supports the corporate brand and creates positive effect on the business.

Employee Value Proposition (EVP)

At the heart of employment branding is the Employee Value Proposition (EVP) – the perceived employment experience that a company offers employees. An EVP includes total rewards, purpose and values of the organisation, job nature, culture and colleagues. Only an established EVP will allow employer branding to unleash its full potential to communicate the key propositions why people want to work for the company.

Many top employers have compelling EVPs which enables them to build strong employer brands that enhance employee attraction and retention. Let us take a look at some of the world’s most attractive employers in 2012 (based on Universum’s global index of employer attractiveness) and find out what differentiates them in the marketplace.

 

  • Google

The world’s most attractive employer receives over one million applications a year! Google’s employer brand is clearly communicated –  the technology giant offers a fun and creative work environment that requires employees to play hard and work hard, and to collaborate with great people to solve big technology problems and produce great results. Candidates know what to expect and want to be part of this culture.

 

  • L’Oreal

L’Oreal is an award-winning company for both its products and human resources initiatives. Its slogan ‘Because you’re worth it’ is engrained in its culture and conveys that employees deserve the long-term investment that the company has put in them. Policies such as global profit sharing and good career prospects make it an attractive place to work.

 

  • Procter & Gamble

By building from within, Procter & Gamble consistently put out the message that it encourages employee potential and enables them to succeed. Its internal people development system is what makes its employer brand unique and differentiates it from competitors. The internal promotion mechanism enables employees to identify with the corporate culture and contributes to the development of the company and the employees.

 

  • Microsoft

Microsoft has strong values that focus on a global approach, highest quality, and innovation. Employees are given the opportunity to work with innovative products. Externally, the company emphasizes on being creative on the job. Internally, the company ensures that employees can develop continuously and strike a work-life balance. This aligns with its employer branding of being innovative, powerful and global.

 

  • Unilever

At Unilever, product innovation and sustainable living are the crux of its brand. This intertwines with its employment brand to be the employer of choice for people who want to work on the future in a sustainable way. Its ‘Made By You’ message communicates that employees have the opportunity to build big consumer brands and develop lasting, challenging careers at the same time.

 

Five steps to Employer Branding

Universum, the global leader in employer branding, suggests five steps for companies to develop the employer brand:

1.    Research

Know the positioning of your company in the employment market so as to determine the appropriate action plan.

 2.    Employee Value Proposition (EVP)

Analyse the factors influencing the employer brand, and define a strong and true EVP. This will help you to deliver sound communications and develop an attractive employment brand.

 3.    Communication strategy

Choose the most efficient and effective channels to reach the talent pool. It is important to emphasise the most attractive factors and be consistent in employer communications.

 4.    Communication Solutions

Use the right words and images to express your company’s EVP so it is in line with the corporate identity and branding efforts. Always strive to develop consistency for all communication materials.

 5.    Action

Implement all the steps, monitor closely what works and adjust the action plan all the time. It is important to set clear and measurable goals on what your company wants to achieve with the planned activities.

 

If your company has not started on the employer branding journey, it is time to take the first step and reap the benefits of a strong employer brand.

Cindy is a freelance writer and has 10 years of communications and human resource experience in the public and service sector. She is an expert in employee engagement and employer branding and has won major HR Awards.

 –

Are you working in HR?  We can help you with your employer branding. Reach out to us at contact@jobiness.com

Fresh Grad's Reflection on Job Hunting

Job hunting is a daunting process for many graduating students because most of us had went through the conventional route to obtain a degree. The major decisions we had made during the 16 years of Singapore’s education are probably limited to the choosing of secondary school, junior college/polytechnic and the courses to pursue in universities.

 We are so used to judging our success with a common yardstick, i.e. GPA. A high GPA means you are a successful student. Holding an appointment within a CCA means you have leadership. Therefore, having good grades with an excellent CCA track record would land you a good job. To an undergraduate, a good job may simply mean a high paying job in a big international organisation.

Once we step out of the university, the standards which we are so used to judging ourselves no longer apply. No one cares about your GPA after you have graduated. The only yardstick to reflect most of our achievement is now relegated to the comparison of salary.

[more…]

 

Step 1: Identify career goals

Unless you believe that only job titles and salary are indicative of your career success, there are no common yardsticks which we can benchmark ourselves against our peers. In fact, I believe the competition does not exist between you and your colleagues but it is within yourself. How do you constantly improve and outdo yourself? And what are the indicators which we ought to use to grade ourselves?

 

The answer will differ according to individuals.

You will probably have an answer once you have a clearer picture of what you want to achieve in 20-30 years’ time. It took me a year to get a better idea of what I want to pursue in my career. So set aside a year before you graduate to think about your career.

  •   Find your interest. Start reading widely. Talk to your friends. I realized that I am reading more as compared to my times in university. Reading exposes you to unfamiliar topics and thoughts. Investment papers, personal finance, biographies, science magazines, philosophy etc.
  •   Seek a mentor. A good way would be to look around your organisation or those around you. Are there anyone who are 20 years your senior whom you would like to emulate?
  •   Be accountable to your family. As much as we would like to pursue our interest, we need to be responsible for our family finances as well. Would your career choice impact your family’s financial well-being?

 

Step 2: Identify skillsets to develop

Once you start to have an inkling of what you want to achieve in your career, the decisions which you make will be slightly more straight-forward. First, identify the competencies you need to achieve what you set out to do. Then find a company which will offer you the opportunities to develop them.

  •   All jobs will enable you to develop competencies. Are they relevant? Are you consciously identifying, learning then applying them?
  •   Take a look at the Harvard Competency Dictionary for a list of the competencies.
  •   Self-directed learning. Start working on these competencies now. Time is too short for us to be good at everything, but it will be even shorter if you don’t act on it now. Take ownership of your learning and growth.

 

Step 3: Which company?

Hopefully, the above questions are answered before you graduate. Rather than casting your net aimlessly, your job search will be more directed. Have you ever wondered about the reasons why people advise that you ought to stay at least 3 years in the job, besides the risk of being labelled as a job hopper? It is because these competencies need at least 3 years to be developed. So the crucial question to ask when you approach a company is whether it can offer you an environment to learn for at least the next 3 years? That will also determine when it is time to move on.

  •   Determine the breadth of exposure and depth of the company’s expertise. What is the background of the management team? Is the company able to expose you to a variety of assignments or will you be doing the same work day in day out? Is the company competent in the work it does? If you want to learn, then obviously go for the best you can find.
  •   Coaching culture within the team. Does the management team place emphasis on training of junior staff? Is there a methodological approach in development and training for the next 3 years?
  •   Ethics and ethos. Does the company engage in work which you aren’t comfortable with? How far are you willing to stretch yourself in this aspect?
  •   Salary should not necessarily be the top priority at this point in time. Nonetheless, it can be a contributing factor to job satisfaction as well. Does the salary commensurate with your job scope? If the salary is too little, you feel overworked and frustrated. Remember Herzberg’s Motivation-Hygiene Theory? Challenging work gives positive satisfaction while salary is a hygiene factor which does not generate positive satisfaction, but its absence would cause dissatisfaction.

 

Other issues to look at once you have settled down in your job

 Once you have secured a job, you can focus on the other pertinent issues.

  • Insurance. Look into insuring yourself. Then insure your parents for their medical needs. Go for coverage that is sufficient and not excessive.
  • Investment. Start reading up on where the money which you are saving can be parked, rather than in a POSB Saving Account. Do think about making quick bucks from the stock market. Even if you manage to do so, you are not going to be always so lucky. More importantly, look beyond the ROI of your financial investment. Continue to invest in yourself through courses and training, it will be one of your best investment
  • Part-time job. Find a part time job that can offer you experience relevant to your aspirations. Or even better still, start a ‘part time’ enterprise! Do not look for a part time job that merely trade your time for money.

 

These are the wisdom that I had gathered from talking to friends and mentors about job search. I hope these points will get you thinking and guide you in your next steps. To those who are graduating, your first job only comes once in a lifetime. Steward this opportunity well. To those who are already in the workforce, it’s never too late to go back to the drawing board and make the switch.

—–

Tan Ming Hui graduated from Nanyang Technological University in 2011 from Mechanical Engineering. He is now a Management Associate at PSA.

What was your job hunting experience like? Share it with us today.

 

Welcoming distractions, procrastination and entertaining all your boss’ requests are among the ways of looking really busy at work without getting anything done. To make up for this, sometimes we work overtime just to feel better about our lack of focus. How can you really make the most of your 9 to 6? You can achieve more during your work hours by simply working smarter, not just harder.

 

Apply these tips to achieve higher productivity and better results:

[more…]

 

1)    Start your day with a to-do list.

After listing your tasks, prioritize them according to importance and deadlines. One simple way is to give an ABC rating of your tasks – ‘A’ for critical ones (must be done by the day), ‘B’ for less urgent but important tasks (can be tackled after ‘A’) and ‘C’ (can be completed later). Doing so will help you to stay focused.

 

2)    Procrastinate no more.

Do you find yourself doing tasks that you like first? Tackle more challenging tasks when your energy level is high at the start of the day. It is tough to be productive when you start feeling tired during the day. Overcome procrastination by breaking complex projects into smaller parts so you can focus on completing one at a time.

 

3)    Organise your desk.

Are you spending too much time on searching for documents, tools or files? A cluttered desk can be a source of stress. Precious time can be saved if you keep your desk organized. Remove the clutter on your desk by designating places for different items, getting rid of things that you don’t need and creating folders for meetings and projects.

 

4)    Take enough breaks.

Do not feel guilty when you take a toilet break or walk to the pantry for a coffee break. Studies have shown that taking regular breaks at work can improve productivity. They help you to clear your mind so you can continue your task with a fresh mind. If you are tired, staying focused on your work will be a challenge.

 

5)    Learn to say no.

Being excellent at work does not mean you have to say yes all the time. You have a good reason to say no if you simply do not have enough time to help your co-workers or your other work will suffer if you take on a new project. By saying no, you can concentrate on the tasks at hand and deliver them on target. Explain your reasons to your boss and colleagues so they can understand where you are coming from.

 

SEE ALSO: Finding Meaning in Your Job

 

6)    Stay away from distractions.

Do you know that checking emails whenever you receive a notification or chatting with colleagues who stop by your desk will take you away from getting work done? Reducing distractions can help you to focus on completing your work. This includes saying no to social media. Carve out work periods, retreating to a quiet zone and disabling digital notifications to minimise interruptions.

 

7)    Focus on one task at a time.

Research has shown that multitasking is counter-productive. Reading your emails while making a call may result in you not fully comprehending the messages. Staying focused on one task at a time will help you to work faster and get more done.

 

8)    Batch together similar tasks.

How much time do you spend transitioning between tasks each day? Setting specific times to respond to your emails at one go and processing business expenses once a month are some of the ways to reduce the amount of time wasted on moving from one task to another.

 

 9)    Concentrate single-mindedly on a task.

Single-handling is a powerful time management technique for boosting productivity and improving efficiency. Once you start on a task, put your heart into it. Be disciplined and do not switch tasks halfway. Stay at it until its completion.

 

10)  Live a healthy lifestyle.

Research has shown that eating, exercising and sleeping habits can affect productivity at work. Eat well and get enough exercise and sleep so you have the energy to get through a busy work day. Skipping your meals or burning the mid-night oil to produce that proposal may be counter-productive.

 

A good worker pursues excellence. Start inculcating these good habits and it will go a long way in helping you stay on top of your game and be increasingly competent. It translates to better work-life balance, freeing you to pursue your interests and spend more time with your loved ones.

 

What’s a day at work like for you? Share it here. 

Do you love writing? Email us (contact@jobiness.com) your resume and writing samples if you want to contribute to our blogs!

Everyone longs to find that perfect, meaningful job that is in line with our greatest passions, and makes us spring out of bed every morning positively raring to go. Considering that we spend the majority of our lives at our jobs, it is certainly important to find work opportunities that create personal fulfillment for ourselves, or find it somehow in our current jobs – or we will end up living a large part of our lives feeling a dreary sense of futility. [more…]

 

Find the Right Job

The most crucial point would definitely be the moment you are looking out for work opportunities. Do not settle for the first job that opens its doors to you – make sure that you research thoroughly the background of the company, the company culture, and so on.

Have a chat with the current employees to get more information about the company, and see if what you find out is in line with your values and passions. If not, it’s time to start hunting again.

 

Make the Most of Your Job

If having to go to work every day makes going to the dentist seem like child’s play, then it’s time for remedial action. One way to find meaning in your job is to change your perspective. Rather than coming for work with a negative mindset, come with an open mind and look out for opportunities to create personal fulfillment.  For example, instead of focusing on the amount of work piled on your table, set up lunch appointments with your colleagues and build on those relationships, or think up initiatives for the company according to your interests. In other words, create value for yourself within the company – something to look forward to.

 

“Rather than coming for work with a negative mindset, come with an open mind and look out for opportunities to create personal fulfillment”

 

If you find the work you are currently doing mundane and uninteresting, take the initiative to give feedback to your boss. Ask for more challenging work (which I am sure he/she will be most glad to give to you), or request to take up new roles in the company. Hardly is a company ever running at maximum capacity – often, the management is always short-handed. Otherwise, you could always go the extra mile on the current projects you are handling, and impress your boss at the same time. In this sense, you are not only increasing your own productivity, you are also creating reasons for yourself to make it to work every day, instead of wasting your life away.

 

It is All Up to You

Ultimately, it is up to you to decide whether or not to create meaning in your job. It takes a certain amount of initiative to do so – laziness certainly will not cut it. Often, employees will end up discouraged and resigned to simply existing in the workplace and meeting the minimum requirements of their job scope – and in the process, missing out on any job satisfaction or personal fulfillment they could have created with a little extra effort. Switch your perspective, and your job could be the perfect opportunity to grow and learn.

 

Do you love writing? Email us (contact@jobiness.com) your resume and writing samples if you want to contribute to our blogs!

Always keep in mind that your main objective during a job interview is to impress the employer and ‘sell’ your skills and competencies to the company. While you already probably know most of the basic tips and tricks to ace your job interview like coming on time, preparing answers to possible questions, dressing appropriately, and all of that, there may be another simple trick that just might get you ahead of other applicants – to ask good questions at the end of your interview. [more…]

 

Most employers will always end an interview with “Do you have any questions?” Now, this is your chance both to learn about the company and impress the interviewer further by showing more interest about the company’s ideals, work culture, and staff. Asking good, sincere questions will show that you are looking forward to joining their team and are serious about your application. Remember, interviewers have the eye for spotting serious applicants from those who are just trying to look around for possible income opportunities. And obviously, they would opt for someone who shows sheer interest and inquisitiveness.

 

Now, don’t just go asking silly questions just so you could ask something. You may have already impressed them during the interview but totally blow it at the end by asking questions that are uncalled for. Below are some quick, intelligent and sincere questions you can always pull out at the end of an interview, as soon as you hear he interviewer ask, “Do you have any questions?”

 

  • “What are the essential traits/skills you are looking for in the person to successful fill this position?” And then follow it up with, “How do you think I measure up to these criteria?” It is always good to hear straight from the interviewer what they are looking for to fill the position. And by asking if you fit their expectations, it would give you the chance to find out what they think you are lacking. You will then have a great opportunity to highlight on some other related strength that you know will definitely interest them.

 

  • “Could you tell me more about the work culture here?” By asking this you are implying that you are very open to working with a diverse work culture and are willing to learn their work culture and blend with the team. This also shows that you really imagine yourself working with them in the near future.

 

  • “How do you measure performance?” This automatically shows that you are very results-driven, you keep to deadlines, and value time and commitment.

 

  • “What would be this company’s biggest challenge right now?” This could open up a great conversation about the bigger picture of what the company does and how you could really be a part of the solution. This is where you can share more of your experiences and knowledge in the industry.

 

  • “Should I call back to follow up or will you just contact me for updates?” End the entire interview by showing your eagerness to land the job and that you are really hoping to get a response from them.

———————–

Click here to learn what kind of interview questions interviews will ask.

Went for an interview recently? Share with us your interview experience! 

You might like: “How to Turn the Tide During an Interview (When Things Go Bad)”

Do you love writing? Email us (contact@jobiness.com) your resume and writing samples if you want to contribute to our blogs!

Always keep in mind that your main objective during a job interview is to impress the employer and ‘sell’ your skills and competencies to the company. While you already probably know most of the basic tips and tricks to ace your job interview like coming on time, preparing answers to possible questions, dressing appropriately, and all of that, there may be another simple trick that just might get you ahead of other applicants – to ask good questions at the end of your interview. [more…]

 

Most employers will always end an interview with “Do you have any questions?” Now, this is your chance both to learn about the company and impress the interviewer further by showing more interest about the company’s ideals, work culture, and staff. Asking good, sincere questions will show that you are looking forward to joining their team and are serious about your application. Remember, interviewers have the eye for spotting serious applicants from those who are just trying to look around for possible income opportunities. And obviously, they would opt for someone who shows sheer interest and inquisitiveness.

 

Now, don’t just go asking silly questions just so you could ask something. You may have already impressed them during the interview but totally blow it at the end by asking questions that are uncalled for. Below are some quick, intelligent and sincere questions you can always pull out at the end of an interview, as soon as you hear he interviewer ask, “Do you have any questions?”

 

  • “What are the essential traits/skills you are looking for in the person to successful fill this position?” And then follow it up with, “How do you think I measure up to these criteria?” It is always good to hear straight from the interviewer what they are looking for to fill the position. And by asking if you fit their expectations, it would give you the chance to find out what they think you are lacking. You will then have a great opportunity to highlight on some other related strength that you know will definitely interest them.

 

  • “Could you tell me more about the work culture here?” By asking this you are implying that you are very open to working with a diverse work culture and are willing to learn their work culture and blend with the team. This also shows that you really imagine yourself working with them in the near future.

 

  • “How do you measure performance?” This automatically shows that you are very results-driven, you keep to deadlines, and value time and commitment.

 

  • “What would be this company’s biggest challenge right now?” This could open up a great conversation about the bigger picture of what the company does and how you could really be a part of the solution. This is where you can share more of your experiences and knowledge in the industry.

 

  • “Should I call back to follow up or will you just contact me for updates?” End the interview by showing your eagerness to land the job and that you are really hoping to get a response from them.

 

———————–

Click here to learn what kind of interview questions interviews will ask.

Went for an interview recently? Share with us your interview experience! 

You might like: “How to Turn the Tide During an Interview (When Things Go Bad)”

Do you love writing? Email us (contact@jobiness.com) your resume and writing samples if you want to contribute to our blogs!

 

Always keep in mind that your main objective during a job interview is to impress the employer and ‘sell’ your skills and competencies to the company. While you already probably know most of the basic tips and tricks to ace your job interview like coming on time, preparing answers to possible questions, dressing appropriately, and all of that, there may be another simple trick that just might get you ahead of other applicants – to ask good questions at the end of your interview. [more…]

 

Most employers will always end an interview with “Do you have any questions?” Now, this is your chance both to learn about the company and impress the interviewer further by showing more interest about the company’s ideals, work culture, and staff. Asking good, sincere questions will show that you are looking forward to joining their team and are serious about your application. Remember, interviewers have the eye for spotting serious applicants from those who are just trying to look around for possible income opportunities. And obviously, they would opt for someone who shows sheer interest and inquisitiveness.

 

Now, don’t just go asking silly questions just so you could ask something. You may have already impressed them during the interview but totally blow it at the end by asking questions that are uncalled for. Below are some quick, intelligent and sincere questions you can always pull out at the end of an interview, as soon as you hear he interviewer ask, “Do you have any questions?”

 

  • “What are the essential traits/skills you are looking for in the person to successful fill this position?” And then follow it up with, “How do you think I measure up to these criteria?” It is always good to hear straight from the interviewer what they are looking for to fill the position. And by asking if you fit their expectations, it would give you the chance to find out what they think you are lacking. You will then have a great opportunity to highlight on some other related strength that you know will definitely interest them.

 

  • “Could you tell me more about the work culture here?” By asking this you are implying that you are very open to working with a diverse work culture and are willing to learn their work culture and blend with the team. This also shows that you really imagine yourself working with them in the near future.

 

  • “How do you measure performance?” This automatically shows that you are very results-driven, you keep to deadlines, and value time and commitment.

 

  • “What would be this company’s biggest challenge right now?” This could open up a great conversation about the bigger picture of what the company does and how you could really be a part of the solution. This is where you can share more of your experiences and knowledge in the industry.

 

  • “Should I call back to follow up or will you just contact me for updates?” End the interview by showing your eagerness to land the job and that you are really hoping to get a response from them.

 

Always keep in mind that your main objective during a job interview is to impress the employer and ‘sell’ your skills and competencies to the company. While you already probably know most of the basic tips and tricks to ace your job interview like coming on time, preparing answers to possible questions, dressing appropriately, and all of that, there may be another simple trick that just might get you ahead of other applicants – to ask good questions at the end of your interview. [more…]

 

Most employers will always end an interview with “Do you have any questions?” Now, this is your chance both to learn about the company and impress the interviewer further by showing more interest about the company’s ideals, work culture, and staff. Asking good, sincere questions will show that you are looking forward to joining their team and are serious about your application. Remember, interviewers have the eye for spotting serious applicants from those who are just trying to look around for possible income opportunities. And obviously, they would opt for someone who shows sheer interest and inquisitiveness.

 

Now, don’t just go asking silly questions just so you could ask something. You may have already impressed them during the interview but totally blow it at the end by asking questions that are uncalled for. Below are some quick, intelligent and sincere questions you can always pull out at the end of an interview, as soon as you hear he interviewer ask, “Do you have any questions?”

 

  • “What are the essential traits/skills you are looking for in the person to successful fill this position?” And then follow it up with, “How do you think I measure up to these criteria?” It is always good to hear straight from the interviewer what they are looking for to fill the position. And by asking if you fit their expectations, it would give you the chance to find out what they think you are lacking. You will then have a great opportunity to highlight on some other related strength that you know will definitely interest them.

 

  • “Could you tell me more about the work culture here?” By asking this you are implying that you are very open to working with a diverse work culture and are willing to learn their work culture and blend with the team. This also shows that you really imagine yourself working with them in the near future.

 

  • “How do you measure performance?” This automatically shows that you are very results-driven, you keep to deadlines, and value time and commitment.

 

  • “What would be this company’s biggest challenge right now?” This could open up a great conversation about the bigger picture of what the company does and how you could really be a part of the solution. This is where you can share more of your experiences and knowledge in the industry.

 

  • “Should I call back to follow up or will you just contact me for updates?” End the entire interview by showing your eagerness to land the job and that you are really hoping to get a response from them.

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Click here to learn what kind of interview questions interviews will ask.

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