Always keep in mind that your main objective during a job interview is to impress the employer and ‘sell’ your skills and competencies to the company. While you already probably know most of the basic tips and tricks to ace your job interview like coming on time, preparing answers to possible questions, dressing appropriately, and all of that, there may be another simple trick that just might get you ahead of other applicants – to ask good questions at the end of your interview. [more…]

 

Most employers will always end an interview with “Do you have any questions?” Now, this is your chance both to learn about the company and impress the interviewer further by showing more interest about the company’s ideals, work culture, and staff. Asking good, sincere questions will show that you are looking forward to joining their team and are serious about your application. Remember, interviewers have the eye for spotting serious applicants from those who are just trying to look around for possible income opportunities. And obviously, they would opt for someone who shows sheer interest and inquisitiveness.

 

Now, don’t just go asking silly questions just so you could ask something. You may have already impressed them during the interview but totally blow it at the end by asking questions that are uncalled for. Below are some quick, intelligent and sincere questions you can always pull out at the end of an interview, as soon as you hear he interviewer ask, “Do you have any questions?”

 

  • “What are the essential traits/skills you are looking for in the person to successful fill this position?” And then follow it up with, “How do you think I measure up to these criteria?” It is always good to hear straight from the interviewer what they are looking for to fill the position. And by asking if you fit their expectations, it would give you the chance to find out what they think you are lacking. You will then have a great opportunity to highlight on some other related strength that you know will definitely interest them.

 

  • “Could you tell me more about the work culture here?” By asking this you are implying that you are very open to working with a diverse work culture and are willing to learn their work culture and blend with the team. This also shows that you really imagine yourself working with them in the near future.

 

  • “How do you measure performance?” This automatically shows that you are very results-driven, you keep to deadlines, and value time and commitment.

 

  • “What would be this company’s biggest challenge right now?” This could open up a great conversation about the bigger picture of what the company does and how you could really be a part of the solution. This is where you can share more of your experiences and knowledge in the industry.

 

  • “Should I call back to follow up or will you just contact me for updates?” End the entire interview by showing your eagerness to land the job and that you are really hoping to get a response from them.

———————–

Click here to learn what kind of interview questions interviews will ask.

Went for an interview recently? Share with us your interview experience! 

You might like: “How to Turn the Tide During an Interview (When Things Go Bad)”

Do you love writing? Email us (contact@jobiness.com) your resume and writing samples if you want to contribute to our blogs!

Always keep in mind that your main objective during a job interview is to impress the employer and ‘sell’ your skills and competencies to the company. While you already probably know most of the basic tips and tricks to ace your job interview like coming on time, preparing answers to possible questions, dressing appropriately, and all of that, there may be another simple trick that just might get you ahead of other applicants – to ask good questions at the end of your interview. [more…]

 

Most employers will always end an interview with “Do you have any questions?” Now, this is your chance both to learn about the company and impress the interviewer further by showing more interest about the company’s ideals, work culture, and staff. Asking good, sincere questions will show that you are looking forward to joining their team and are serious about your application. Remember, interviewers have the eye for spotting serious applicants from those who are just trying to look around for possible income opportunities. And obviously, they would opt for someone who shows sheer interest and inquisitiveness.

 

Now, don’t just go asking silly questions just so you could ask something. You may have already impressed them during the interview but totally blow it at the end by asking questions that are uncalled for. Below are some quick, intelligent and sincere questions you can always pull out at the end of an interview, as soon as you hear he interviewer ask, “Do you have any questions?”

 

  • “What are the essential traits/skills you are looking for in the person to successful fill this position?” And then follow it up with, “How do you think I measure up to these criteria?” It is always good to hear straight from the interviewer what they are looking for to fill the position. And by asking if you fit their expectations, it would give you the chance to find out what they think you are lacking. You will then have a great opportunity to highlight on some other related strength that you know will definitely interest them.

 

  • “Could you tell me more about the work culture here?” By asking this you are implying that you are very open to working with a diverse work culture and are willing to learn their work culture and blend with the team. This also shows that you really imagine yourself working with them in the near future.

 

  • “How do you measure performance?” This automatically shows that you are very results-driven, you keep to deadlines, and value time and commitment.

 

  • “What would be this company’s biggest challenge right now?” This could open up a great conversation about the bigger picture of what the company does and how you could really be a part of the solution. This is where you can share more of your experiences and knowledge in the industry.

 

  • “Should I call back to follow up or will you just contact me for updates?” End the interview by showing your eagerness to land the job and that you are really hoping to get a response from them.

 

———————–

Click here to learn what kind of interview questions interviews will ask.

Went for an interview recently? Share with us your interview experience! 

You might like: “How to Turn the Tide During an Interview (When Things Go Bad)”

Do you love writing? Email us (contact@jobiness.com) your resume and writing samples if you want to contribute to our blogs!

 

Always keep in mind that your main objective during a job interview is to impress the employer and ‘sell’ your skills and competencies to the company. While you already probably know most of the basic tips and tricks to ace your job interview like coming on time, preparing answers to possible questions, dressing appropriately, and all of that, there may be another simple trick that just might get you ahead of other applicants – to ask good questions at the end of your interview. [more…]

 

Most employers will always end an interview with “Do you have any questions?” Now, this is your chance both to learn about the company and impress the interviewer further by showing more interest about the company’s ideals, work culture, and staff. Asking good, sincere questions will show that you are looking forward to joining their team and are serious about your application. Remember, interviewers have the eye for spotting serious applicants from those who are just trying to look around for possible income opportunities. And obviously, they would opt for someone who shows sheer interest and inquisitiveness.

 

Now, don’t just go asking silly questions just so you could ask something. You may have already impressed them during the interview but totally blow it at the end by asking questions that are uncalled for. Below are some quick, intelligent and sincere questions you can always pull out at the end of an interview, as soon as you hear he interviewer ask, “Do you have any questions?”

 

  • “What are the essential traits/skills you are looking for in the person to successful fill this position?” And then follow it up with, “How do you think I measure up to these criteria?” It is always good to hear straight from the interviewer what they are looking for to fill the position. And by asking if you fit their expectations, it would give you the chance to find out what they think you are lacking. You will then have a great opportunity to highlight on some other related strength that you know will definitely interest them.

 

  • “Could you tell me more about the work culture here?” By asking this you are implying that you are very open to working with a diverse work culture and are willing to learn their work culture and blend with the team. This also shows that you really imagine yourself working with them in the near future.

 

  • “How do you measure performance?” This automatically shows that you are very results-driven, you keep to deadlines, and value time and commitment.

 

  • “What would be this company’s biggest challenge right now?” This could open up a great conversation about the bigger picture of what the company does and how you could really be a part of the solution. This is where you can share more of your experiences and knowledge in the industry.

 

  • “Should I call back to follow up or will you just contact me for updates?” End the interview by showing your eagerness to land the job and that you are really hoping to get a response from them.

 

Always keep in mind that your main objective during a job interview is to impress the employer and ‘sell’ your skills and competencies to the company. While you already probably know most of the basic tips and tricks to ace your job interview like coming on time, preparing answers to possible questions, dressing appropriately, and all of that, there may be another simple trick that just might get you ahead of other applicants – to ask good questions at the end of your interview. [more…]

 

Most employers will always end an interview with “Do you have any questions?” Now, this is your chance both to learn about the company and impress the interviewer further by showing more interest about the company’s ideals, work culture, and staff. Asking good, sincere questions will show that you are looking forward to joining their team and are serious about your application. Remember, interviewers have the eye for spotting serious applicants from those who are just trying to look around for possible income opportunities. And obviously, they would opt for someone who shows sheer interest and inquisitiveness.

 

Now, don’t just go asking silly questions just so you could ask something. You may have already impressed them during the interview but totally blow it at the end by asking questions that are uncalled for. Below are some quick, intelligent and sincere questions you can always pull out at the end of an interview, as soon as you hear he interviewer ask, “Do you have any questions?”

 

  • “What are the essential traits/skills you are looking for in the person to successful fill this position?” And then follow it up with, “How do you think I measure up to these criteria?” It is always good to hear straight from the interviewer what they are looking for to fill the position. And by asking if you fit their expectations, it would give you the chance to find out what they think you are lacking. You will then have a great opportunity to highlight on some other related strength that you know will definitely interest them.

 

  • “Could you tell me more about the work culture here?” By asking this you are implying that you are very open to working with a diverse work culture and are willing to learn their work culture and blend with the team. This also shows that you really imagine yourself working with them in the near future.

 

  • “How do you measure performance?” This automatically shows that you are very results-driven, you keep to deadlines, and value time and commitment.

 

  • “What would be this company’s biggest challenge right now?” This could open up a great conversation about the bigger picture of what the company does and how you could really be a part of the solution. This is where you can share more of your experiences and knowledge in the industry.

 

  • “Should I call back to follow up or will you just contact me for updates?” End the entire interview by showing your eagerness to land the job and that you are really hoping to get a response from them.

———————–

Click here to learn what kind of interview questions interviews will ask.

Went for an interview recently? Share with us your interview experience! 

You might like: “How to Turn the Tide During an Interview (When Things Go Bad)”

Love or hate your company? We are giving away a $5 McDonald’s Voucher to the first 100 Job Review contributors. Help others get an inside look at your current/former employer.

3 Simple Steps to Winning:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read further for detailed steps to winning:

1)      Post a review of your company. (Share what you like/dislike about your former/current employer!)

*2)      In the title of your review, type hashtag followed by marcontest (#marcontest)* followed by a one-liner about how you feel about your job.

3)      Click “Next” to submit Review. You will have to create an account or login for the post to be recorded.

 Giveaway Details[more…]:

-          Only to the first 100 valid reviews (please read the guidelines below for what defines a valid review). Please provide as much detail as possible!

-          Title of review must contain #marcontest

-          Multiple reviews are allowed only for experiences from different companies/jobs. Double entries for the same job in the same company is not allowed.

-          Contest period: 6th March 2013 (Wednesday), 00:00 to 22th March 2013 (Friday), 23:59 (GMT +8)

-          First 100 Contributors will be notified by email (that was used for login) on 26th March 2013 (Tuesday), 12:00.

-          Winners will have to reply to the email by 27st March 2013, 23:59 with full name and address. Voucher will be forfeited if there is no reply.

-          Vouchers will be mailed out on 29th March 2013

-          Any enquiries, please write to contact@jobiness.com

___________________________________________________________________________________________

 For some inspiration, here are some recent reviews from the community:

Barclays Capital (Former Employee)

“Very London driven but not a global bank yet.”

 

Singapore Airlines (Former Employee)

“Senior management are not taking in ideas.”

 

American Express (Current Employee)

“Great career progression and benefits”      

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

 Guidelines for Job Review

  • We maintain the highest levels of quality control to protect our members from fake/misleading entries.
  • All entries are examined and certified to be authentic before being posted onto this site. Any suspicious entries will be immediately investigated and action taken as necessary.

The following is prohibited from posting on the site;

-          Slang words or obscenities

-          Personal attacks or insults (to persons, positions or institutions)

-          Information which is irrelevant or not useful to members

-          Comments that are offensive or discriminatory

-          Violations of privacy

-          Comments written entirely in capital letters, are unintelligible or incoherent

 

Remember – your contribution is anonymous and you can even post if you work at a small company or you’re the only one with your job title.

 

A lot of people think that the interview (and their killer interview questions) is the most terrifying part of their job search. I beg to differ – I think that the most nerve-wrecking part about the job search process is sending out your applications, and then having to sit back and wait for replies. Whenever I send out applications for job openings, I find myself unwittingly checking my email once every 3 hours, and I can’t seem to be able to wholeheartedly focus on anything else. Within 2-3 days, I find myself shooting out emails “checking back on the status of my applications”. [more…]

 

With unemployment looming – and especially after the long, arduous process of filling out online applications, resumes, beautifying portfolios, and networking furiously – one can hardly be faulted for pouncing on every career opportunity and holding on to it for dear life.

 

At the end of the day, in order to spare yourself the torture, it might be better to get to the root of the problem instead of biting your nails. You know what they say: Know your enemy and know yourself, and you can win a hundred battles. In this case, all you need to do is win one battle to find yourself gainfully employed. Here are the top 3 reasons why you never hear back after applying for a job – and what to do to salvage the situation:

 

1)      Your application never reached the eyes of the hiring manager.

In 2012, The Wall Street Journal published a startling piece of statistic: Human eyes may never read as many as 25 out of a 100 job applications, because most resumes are missing the keywords that the recruiting software used by the companies scan and rank. Of course, if your resume does not even reach the eyes of the hiring manager, he or she will not even know you exist.

The simply remedy: Make sure that your resume has the right keywords that correspond with the job opening that you are applying for. At the same time, don’t get too trigger-happy with the keywords, or your resume will not appear readable or coherent even if it is read.

 

2)      You were never qualified for the job opening to begin with.

Make no mistake – when a company puts up a job vacancy looking for a copywriter with 5-7 years of experience, and your resume shows that you have extensive experience in the area of web development, you can certainly be sure that you will not get called up. Many people do “try their luck” by attempting to market themselves as a jack-of-all-trades who can handle any job opening. Well, hiring managers are definitely not looking for someone who might be able to do the job eventually. They want results from the moment the employee steps in the door – and you don’t fill the bill.

Solution? Only apply for job vacancies that you qualify for. If you are looking to explore new areas, don’t bother applying for senior positions in that industry – aim for an internship or even junior positions.

 

3)      Your online profiles were researched, and the hiring manager did not like what he/she saw.

Gone are the days where your social life was off-limits to your professional life. In fact, you can be sure that the hiring manager is going to browse through your collection of partying photos on Facebook and the ugly comments you made about your in-laws on Twitter. Now, that sure won’t make a good impression on you, nor help your chances for nailing that job opening – even if your resume is absolutely glowing.

To resolve such pesky online trouble, start an extensive spring-cleaning campaign on all your online profiles. Start by running a simple Google search on your name, and ensure that all the searches that relate to you look squeaky clean. Ensure that how you present yourself on your social networks is respectable. Don’t go overboard though – companies want employees with personality as well.

 

 Related Article: 4 must-know features on LinkedIn

 

4)      You waited… But never did follow-up.

After sending out a ton of applications, it’s easy to get utterly demoralized and not even bother to check back with the hiring manager with regards to your application status. Taking this step, however, shows him/her that you are serious and very interested in the job opening.

Keep it cool – follow up with a phone call or an email a week or two after to demonstrate your interest and check whether your materials have been received. Hiring managers are usually drowning in a flood of applications, so don’t give up hope so easily.

 

5)      The hiring manager isn’t the only way into the company – you forgot the existing employees!

The corporate world is a world that values connections. If you have a contact in the company who can put in a good word for you, this would definitely magically accelerate your application to the top of the pile. If you don’t, find a way to make a connection – LinkedIn is a fantastic platform to use to see if any of your connections link to someone in the company you are interested in.

Once you’ve found that perfect connection, ask the person out (nicely) and treat him/her to a cup of coffee. Communicate your interest clearly, show that you are the right fit for the company, and you might find yourself on the express route in.

 

 

All in all, don’t waste time feeling sorry for yourself if you don’t hear back from the company. There is always a positive action to take that might land you the job, or even a second chance at expressing your interest and showing your abilities. Do a diagnostic and figure out where it went wrong, and prepare yourself well for the next round.

 

A well-written resignation letter always leaves you with more open doors even after departing from the organization. Additionally, a well-executed and graceful exit letter will give you additional leverage in your future job, whether for networking purposes or as staunch referrers.

 

What are the important aspects an individual has to bear in mind when tendering a resignation?

[more…]Maintain a formal but friendly tone: Your resignation letter should appear as a formal and friendly business letter starting with an initial name like “Dear First Name,” as against “Dear Mr. X,”.
 
Avoid being equivocated: Make it a point to clarify that you’re not ready to accept counter offers by using a clear-cut line like, “I hereby render my resignation letter as effective from (date)”. Ideally, people who are in more senior positions or hold greater responsibilities should give more than 2 weeks’ notice.
 
Be complimentary: The letter has to be highlighted in such a manner that it shows your gratitude towards the organization. You can use lines like, “I cannot thank you enough for all that I have learnt and all the chances kindly bestowed upon me during the past five (it can be less or more) years”.
 
Set the record clean: Since the letter is going to be filed in personal records, you have to pay close attention while presenting the contents of the letter. It is also good practice to mention your accomplishments in it. Taking such a step is necessary as it will put you in a good position in your future endeavor in finding a job. It is also important because there may be a probability that you will have to work with the same HR department staff.

 

“A well-executed and graceful exit letter will give you additional leverage in your future job”

 

 Related Article: How to Turn the Tide during an Interview (When things go Bad)

 

Stay positive: Should an upcoming employer seek to verify your employment history, they might speak with somebody who is aware of your pitfalls and strengths. Ideally, you would want them to see that the last words written by you are “positive, uplifting and thankful”. Even if there are any adverse remarks in your file, the human spirit will be spurred to negate the same, especially if you appear nice and non-threatening on paper.
 
Be supportive: Let your employer understand that you are ready to offer help in the transition, if required, after your previous date of employment. Be enthusiastic to share your telephone number with your last employer and convey your preparedness to field any questions on the job front.

End on a warm note: It would be apt if could end your resignation letter in the following manner: “Dear Hiring Manager, without your able guidance and cooperation, I would not have landed at this job opportunity. I am truly grateful to you and can only hope that my replacement will be as supportive as I was”.  Sign off your letter on a warm note, such as, “Respectfully yours”, or “Warmest regards”.

 

With a warm tone and words of appreciation, you will get to leave with a fuzzy feeling, and at the same time still be remembered by your colleagues in a positive light.

 

 

A well-written resignation letter always leaves you with more open doors even after departing from the organization. Additionally, a well-executed and graceful exit letter will give you additional leverage in your future job, whether for networking purposes or as staunch referrers.

 

What are the important aspects an individual has to bear in mind when tendering a resignation?

[more…]Maintain a formal but friendly tone: Your resignation letter should appear as a formal and friendly business letter starting with an initial name like “Dear First Name,” as against “Dear Mr. X,”.
 
Avoid being equivocated: Make it a point to clarify that you’re not ready to accept counter offers by using a clear-cut line like, “I hereby render my resignation letter as effective from (date)”. Ideally, people who are in more senior positions or hold greater responsibilities should give more than 2 weeks’ notice.
 
Be complimentary: The letter has to be highlighted in such a manner that it shows your gratitude towards the organization. You can use lines like, “I cannot thank you enough for all that I have learnt and all the chances kindly bestowed upon me during the past five (it can be less or more) years”.
 
Set the record clean: Since the letter is going to be filed in personal records, you have to pay close attention while presenting the contents of the letter. It is also good practice to mention your accomplishments in it. Taking such a step is necessary as it will put you in a good position in your future endeavor in finding a job. It is also important because there may be a probability that you will have to work with the same HR department staff.

 

“A well-executed and graceful exit letter will give you additional leverage in your future job”

 

 Related Article: How to Turn the Tide during an Interview (When things go Bad)

 

Stay positive: Should an upcoming employer seek to verify your employment history, they might speak with somebody who is aware of your pitfalls and strengths. Ideally, you would want them to see that the last words written by you are “positive, uplifting and thankful”. Even if there are any adverse remarks in your file, the human spirit will be spurred to negate the same, especially if you appear nice and non-threatening on paper.
 
Be supportive: Let your employer understand that you are ready to offer help in the transition, if required, after your previous date of employment. Be enthusiastic to share your telephone number with your last employer and convey your preparedness to field any questions on the job front.

End on a warm note: It would be apt if could end your resignation letter in the following manner: “Dear Hiring Manager, without your able guidance and cooperation, I would not have landed at this job opportunity. I am truly grateful to you and can only hope that my replacement will be as supportive as I was”.  Sign off your letter on a warm note, such as, “Respectfully yours”, or “Warmest regards”.

 

With a warm tone and words of appreciation, you will get to leave with a fuzzy feeling, and at the same time still be remembered by your colleagues in a positive light.

 

A well-written resignation letter always leaves you with more open doors even after departing from the organization. Additionally, a well-executed and graceful exit letter will give you additional leverage in your future job, whether for networking purposes or as staunch referrers.

 

What are the important aspects an individual has to bear in mind when tendering a resignation?

[more…]Maintain a formal but friendly tone: Your resignation letter should appear as a formal and friendly business letter starting with an initial name like “Dear First Name,” as against “Dear Mr. X,”.
 
Avoid being equivocated: Make it a point to clarify that you’re not ready to accept counter offers by using a clear-cut line like, “I hereby render my resignation letter as effective from (date)”. Ideally, people who are in more senior positions or hold greater responsibilities should give more than 2 weeks’ notice.
 
Be complimentary: The letter has to be highlighted in such a manner that it shows your gratitude towards the organization. You can use lines like, “I cannot thank you enough for all that I have learnt and all the chances kindly bestowed upon me during the past five (it can be less or more) years”.
 
Set the record clean: Since the letter is going to be filed in personal records, you have to pay close attention while presenting the contents of the letter. It is also good practice to mention your accomplishments in it. Taking such a step is necessary as it will put you in a good position in your future endeavor in finding a job. It is also important because there may be a probability that you will have to work with the same HR department staff.

 

“A well-executed and graceful exit letter will give you additional leverage in your future job”

 

 Related Article: How to Turn the Tide during an Interview (When things go Bad)

 

Stay positive: Should an upcoming employer seek to verify your employment history, they might speak with somebody who is aware of your pitfalls and strengths. Ideally, you would want them to see that the last words written by you are “positive, uplifting and thankful”. Even if there are any adverse remarks in your file, the human spirit will be spurred to negate the same, especially if you appear nice and non-threatening on paper.
 
Be supportive: Let your employer understand that you are ready to offer help in the transition, if required, after your previous date of employment. Be enthusiastic to share your telephone number with your last employer and convey your preparedness to field any questions on the job front.

End on a warm note: It would be apt if could end your resignation letter in the following manner: “Dear Hiring Manager, without your able guidance and cooperation, I would not have landed at this job opportunity. I am truly grateful to you and can only hope that my replacement will be as supportive as I was”.  Sign off your letter on a warm note, such as, “Respectfully yours”, or “Warmest regards”.

 

With a warm tone and words of appreciation, you will get to leave with a fuzzy feeling, and at the same time still be remembered by your colleagues in a positive light.

 

A well-written resignation letter always leaves you with more open doors even after departing from the organization. Additionally, a well-executed and graceful exit letter will give you additional leverage in your future job, whether for networking purposes or as staunch referrers.

 

What are the important aspects an individual has to bear in mind when tendering a resignation?

[more…]Maintain a formal but friendly tone: Your resignation letter should appear as a formal and friendly business letter starting with an initial name like “Dear First Name,” as against “Dear Mr. X,”.
 
Avoid being equivocated: Make it a point to clarify that you’re not ready to accept counter offers by using a clear-cut line like, “I hereby render my resignation letter as effective from (date)”. Ideally, people who are in more senior positions or hold greater responsibilities should give more than 2 weeks’ notice.
 
Be complimentary: The letter has to be highlighted in such a manner that it shows your gratitude towards the organization. You can use lines like, “I cannot thank you enough for all that I have learnt and all the chances kindly bestowed upon me during the past five (it can be less or more) years”.
 
Set the record clean: Since the letter is going to be filed in personal records, you have to pay close attention while presenting the contents of the letter. It is also good practice to mention your accomplishments in it. Taking such a step is necessary as it will put you in a good position in your future endeavor in finding a job. It is also important because there may be a probability that you will have to work with the same HR department staff.

 

“A well-executed and graceful exit letter will give you additional leverage in your future job”

 

 Related Article: How to Turn the Tide during an Interview (When things go Bad)

 

Stay positive: Should an upcoming employer seek to verify your employment history, they might speak with somebody who is aware of your pitfalls and strengths. Ideally, you would want them to see that the last words written by you are “positive, uplifting and thankful”. Even if there are any adverse remarks in your file, the human spirit will be spurred to negate the same, especially if you appear nice and non-threatening on paper.
 
Be supportive: Let your employer understand that you are ready to offer help in the transition, if required, after your previous date of employment. Be enthusiastic to share your telephone number with your last employer and convey your preparedness to field any questions on the job front.

End on a warm note: It would be apt if could end your resignation letter in the following manner: “Dear Hiring Manager, without your able guidance and cooperation, I would not have landed at this job opportunity. I am truly grateful to you and can only hope that my replacement will be as supportive as I was”.  Sign off your letter on a warm note, such as, “Respectfully yours”, or “Warmest regards”.

 

With a warm tone and words of appreciation, you will get to leave with a fuzzy feeling, and at the same time still be remembered by your colleagues in a positive light.