A well-written resignation letter always leaves you with more open doors even after departing from the organization. Additionally, a well-executed and graceful exit letter will give you additional leverage in your future job, whether for networking purposes or as staunch referrers.

 

What are the important aspects an individual has to bear in mind when tendering a resignation?

[more…]Maintain a formal but friendly tone: Your resignation letter should appear as a formal and friendly business letter starting with an initial name like “Dear First Name,” as against “Dear Mr. X,”.
 
Avoid being equivocated: Make it a point to clarify that you’re not ready to accept counter offers by using a clear-cut line like, “I hereby render my resignation letter as effective from (date)”. Ideally, people who are in more senior positions or hold greater responsibilities should give more than 2 weeks’ notice.
 
Be complimentary: The letter has to be highlighted in such a manner that it shows your gratitude towards the organization. You can use lines like, “I cannot thank you enough for all that I have learnt and all the chances kindly bestowed upon me during the past five (it can be less or more) years”.
 
Set the record clean: Since the letter is going to be filed in personal records, you have to pay close attention while presenting the contents of the letter. It is also good practice to mention your accomplishments in it. Taking such a step is necessary as it will put you in a good position in your future endeavor in finding a job. It is also important because there may be a probability that you will have to work with the same HR department staff.

 

“A well-executed and graceful exit letter will give you additional leverage in your future job”

 

 Related Article: How to Turn the Tide during an Interview (When things go Bad)

 

Stay positive: Should an upcoming employer seek to verify your employment history, they might speak with somebody who is aware of your pitfalls and strengths. Ideally, you would want them to see that the last words written by you are “positive, uplifting and thankful”. Even if there are any adverse remarks in your file, the human spirit will be spurred to negate the same, especially if you appear nice and non-threatening on paper.
 
Be supportive: Let your employer understand that you are ready to offer help in the transition, if required, after your previous date of employment. Be enthusiastic to share your telephone number with your last employer and convey your preparedness to field any questions on the job front.

End on a warm note: It would be apt if could end your resignation letter in the following manner: “Dear Hiring Manager, without your able guidance and cooperation, I would not have landed at this job opportunity. I am truly grateful to you and can only hope that my replacement will be as supportive as I was”.  Sign off your letter on a warm note, such as, “Respectfully yours”, or “Warmest regards”.

 

With a warm tone and words of appreciation, you will get to leave with a fuzzy feeling, and at the same time still be remembered by your colleagues in a positive light.

 

 

A well-written resignation letter always leaves you with more open doors even after departing from the organization. Additionally, a well-executed and graceful exit letter will give you additional leverage in your future job, whether for networking purposes or as staunch referrers.

 

What are the important aspects an individual has to bear in mind when tendering a resignation?

[more…]Maintain a formal but friendly tone: Your resignation letter should appear as a formal and friendly business letter starting with an initial name like “Dear First Name,” as against “Dear Mr. X,”.
 
Avoid being equivocated: Make it a point to clarify that you’re not ready to accept counter offers by using a clear-cut line like, “I hereby render my resignation letter as effective from (date)”. Ideally, people who are in more senior positions or hold greater responsibilities should give more than 2 weeks’ notice.
 
Be complimentary: The letter has to be highlighted in such a manner that it shows your gratitude towards the organization. You can use lines like, “I cannot thank you enough for all that I have learnt and all the chances kindly bestowed upon me during the past five (it can be less or more) years”.
 
Set the record clean: Since the letter is going to be filed in personal records, you have to pay close attention while presenting the contents of the letter. It is also good practice to mention your accomplishments in it. Taking such a step is necessary as it will put you in a good position in your future endeavor in finding a job. It is also important because there may be a probability that you will have to work with the same HR department staff.

 

“A well-executed and graceful exit letter will give you additional leverage in your future job”

 

 Related Article: How to Turn the Tide during an Interview (When things go Bad)

 

Stay positive: Should an upcoming employer seek to verify your employment history, they might speak with somebody who is aware of your pitfalls and strengths. Ideally, you would want them to see that the last words written by you are “positive, uplifting and thankful”. Even if there are any adverse remarks in your file, the human spirit will be spurred to negate the same, especially if you appear nice and non-threatening on paper.
 
Be supportive: Let your employer understand that you are ready to offer help in the transition, if required, after your previous date of employment. Be enthusiastic to share your telephone number with your last employer and convey your preparedness to field any questions on the job front.

End on a warm note: It would be apt if could end your resignation letter in the following manner: “Dear Hiring Manager, without your able guidance and cooperation, I would not have landed at this job opportunity. I am truly grateful to you and can only hope that my replacement will be as supportive as I was”.  Sign off your letter on a warm note, such as, “Respectfully yours”, or “Warmest regards”.

 

With a warm tone and words of appreciation, you will get to leave with a fuzzy feeling, and at the same time still be remembered by your colleagues in a positive light.

 

A well-written resignation letter always leaves you with more open doors even after departing from the organization. Additionally, a well-executed and graceful exit letter will give you additional leverage in your future job, whether for networking purposes or as staunch referrers.

 

What are the important aspects an individual has to bear in mind when tendering a resignation?

[more…]Maintain a formal but friendly tone: Your resignation letter should appear as a formal and friendly business letter starting with an initial name like “Dear First Name,” as against “Dear Mr. X,”.
 
Avoid being equivocated: Make it a point to clarify that you’re not ready to accept counter offers by using a clear-cut line like, “I hereby render my resignation letter as effective from (date)”. Ideally, people who are in more senior positions or hold greater responsibilities should give more than 2 weeks’ notice.
 
Be complimentary: The letter has to be highlighted in such a manner that it shows your gratitude towards the organization. You can use lines like, “I cannot thank you enough for all that I have learnt and all the chances kindly bestowed upon me during the past five (it can be less or more) years”.
 
Set the record clean: Since the letter is going to be filed in personal records, you have to pay close attention while presenting the contents of the letter. It is also good practice to mention your accomplishments in it. Taking such a step is necessary as it will put you in a good position in your future endeavor in finding a job. It is also important because there may be a probability that you will have to work with the same HR department staff.

 

“A well-executed and graceful exit letter will give you additional leverage in your future job”

 

 Related Article: How to Turn the Tide during an Interview (When things go Bad)

 

Stay positive: Should an upcoming employer seek to verify your employment history, they might speak with somebody who is aware of your pitfalls and strengths. Ideally, you would want them to see that the last words written by you are “positive, uplifting and thankful”. Even if there are any adverse remarks in your file, the human spirit will be spurred to negate the same, especially if you appear nice and non-threatening on paper.
 
Be supportive: Let your employer understand that you are ready to offer help in the transition, if required, after your previous date of employment. Be enthusiastic to share your telephone number with your last employer and convey your preparedness to field any questions on the job front.

End on a warm note: It would be apt if could end your resignation letter in the following manner: “Dear Hiring Manager, without your able guidance and cooperation, I would not have landed at this job opportunity. I am truly grateful to you and can only hope that my replacement will be as supportive as I was”.  Sign off your letter on a warm note, such as, “Respectfully yours”, or “Warmest regards”.

 

With a warm tone and words of appreciation, you will get to leave with a fuzzy feeling, and at the same time still be remembered by your colleagues in a positive light.

 

A well-written resignation letter always leaves you with more open doors even after departing from the organization. Additionally, a well-executed and graceful exit letter will give you additional leverage in your future job, whether for networking purposes or as staunch referrers.

 

What are the important aspects an individual has to bear in mind when tendering a resignation?

[more…]Maintain a formal but friendly tone: Your resignation letter should appear as a formal and friendly business letter starting with an initial name like “Dear First Name,” as against “Dear Mr. X,”.
 
Avoid being equivocated: Make it a point to clarify that you’re not ready to accept counter offers by using a clear-cut line like, “I hereby render my resignation letter as effective from (date)”. Ideally, people who are in more senior positions or hold greater responsibilities should give more than 2 weeks’ notice.
 
Be complimentary: The letter has to be highlighted in such a manner that it shows your gratitude towards the organization. You can use lines like, “I cannot thank you enough for all that I have learnt and all the chances kindly bestowed upon me during the past five (it can be less or more) years”.
 
Set the record clean: Since the letter is going to be filed in personal records, you have to pay close attention while presenting the contents of the letter. It is also good practice to mention your accomplishments in it. Taking such a step is necessary as it will put you in a good position in your future endeavor in finding a job. It is also important because there may be a probability that you will have to work with the same HR department staff.

 

“A well-executed and graceful exit letter will give you additional leverage in your future job”

 

 Related Article: How to Turn the Tide during an Interview (When things go Bad)

 

Stay positive: Should an upcoming employer seek to verify your employment history, they might speak with somebody who is aware of your pitfalls and strengths. Ideally, you would want them to see that the last words written by you are “positive, uplifting and thankful”. Even if there are any adverse remarks in your file, the human spirit will be spurred to negate the same, especially if you appear nice and non-threatening on paper.
 
Be supportive: Let your employer understand that you are ready to offer help in the transition, if required, after your previous date of employment. Be enthusiastic to share your telephone number with your last employer and convey your preparedness to field any questions on the job front.

End on a warm note: It would be apt if could end your resignation letter in the following manner: “Dear Hiring Manager, without your able guidance and cooperation, I would not have landed at this job opportunity. I am truly grateful to you and can only hope that my replacement will be as supportive as I was”.  Sign off your letter on a warm note, such as, “Respectfully yours”, or “Warmest regards”.

 

With a warm tone and words of appreciation, you will get to leave with a fuzzy feeling, and at the same time still be remembered by your colleagues in a positive light.

 

 

The “firsts” in life are always scary, especially when it comes to the first job interview; nothing can be more daunting. Whether it’s face-to-face or online , the good news is (as a general rule of thumb) if you take simple steps and precautions, you can convert your D-day into one of your best experiences ever. Read on to find some easy and effective tips for job interview. [more…]

Polish your intellect

  1. Research: A valuable research calls for an impressive knowledge about the company, the position you are applying for, and the interviewer. Research the company’s profile, achievements, and background. Know as much about the company as feasible. You should always be prepared to talk in depth about the organization, industry, and the position you are applying for. This will certainly give you an edge over the other candidates. Also, try learning your interviewer’s name and the job position. You may call the company for this purpose.
  2. Anticipate: Based on the research you have done, try anticipating some possible questions for job interview. Start from basic questions such as “why do you need the job”, “what have been your experience in the industry”, and others. Later, move on to other more complex and industry oriented questions. A prior comprehension and expectation of these questions for job interview will help you feel a lot more comfortable during the interview.
  3. Practice: Like any other important task, it is a must to practice for a successful job interview. Practice giving complete and concise answers with appropriate terminology. Ensure that you aren’t speaking too slow or too fast, and state your answers with confidence. You can also start by practicing with a peer in order to obtain feedback in a more relaxed setting, which will allow you to gain greater confidence before subjecting yourself to a less forgiving environment.

Take Command over your body language

Just like a first date, the most vital visual during the interview is you, and a great amount of this “visual you” is conveyed through your body language. Remember, every tiny movement and action of yours is being observed from the moment you enter the room, sit down, interact, and finally go out. Practicing beforehand in the mirror is a great way to hone this skill.

You must maintain a poised and active posture throughout. Also, observe your gestures when you speak.

  • Keep your chin parallel to the floor and spine erect, and make confident moves. Maintain open handed gestures to build trust and rapport with your interviewers.
  • Make meaningful eye contact with one interviewer at a time for 3-6 seconds.
  • Lastly, no matter how stressed or nervous you may feel, give a dazzling, confident smile to put yourself and the interviewer at ease. A real genuine smile will engage your zygomatic muscles that are responsible for bringing laugh lines near the eyes, communicating friendliness and openness.
  • Dress in your best formal way. Choose conservative shades, crisp clothes and minimal accessories. Avoid wearing strong fragrances and keep your hair off your face.

Infuse Self-Confidence

If you are an otherwise grumbling person, keep your thoughts at bay while you are preparing for your interview. Employ a simple mantra of “think well and feel good”. Recall your past achievements. Believe in the positive you. Keep track of small events that are directly proportional to your confidence levels. On the big day itself, ensure that you have done the following:

  • Organize your interview supplies, documents, and make sure to carry extra copies of your CV.
  • Don’t skip a healthy breakfast as a good breakfast improves the functioning of your brain and boosts alertness.
  • Reach at least 15 minutes before the scheduled time. You need to acquaint yourself with the environment to fit into it.
  • Check for bad breath and utilize the additional time to freshen yourself up by using a mouthwash.

By implementing the above stated interview tips in your preparation strategy, you should be able to perform assertively and with greater ease on your interview day.

 

The “firsts” in life are always scary, especially when it comes to the first job interview; nothing can be more daunting. Whether it’s face-to-face or online , the good news is (as a general rule of thumb) if you take simple steps and precautions, you can convert your D-day into one of your best experiences ever. Read on to find some easy and effective tips for job interview. [more…]

Polish your intellect

  1. Research: A valuable research calls for an impressive knowledge about the company, the position you are applying for, and the interviewer. Research the company’s profile, achievements, and background. Know as much about the company as feasible. You should always be prepared to talk in depth about the organization, industry, and the position you are applying for. This will certainly give you an edge over the other candidates. Also, try learning your interviewer’s name and the job position. You may call the company for this purpose.
  2. Anticipate: Based on the research you have done, try anticipating some possible questions for job interview. Start from basic questions such as “why do you need the job”, “what have been your experience in the industry”, and others. Later, move on to other more complex and industry oriented questions. A prior comprehension and expectation of these questions for job interview will help you feel a lot more comfortable during the interview.
  3. Practice: Like any other important task, it is a must to practice for a successful job interview. Practice giving complete and concise answers with appropriate terminology. Ensure that you aren’t speaking too slow or too fast, and state your answers with confidence. You can also start by practicing with a peer in order to obtain feedback in a more relaxed setting, which will allow you to gain greater confidence before subjecting yourself to a less forgiving environment.

Take Command over your body language

Just like a first date, the most vital visual during the interview is you, and a great amount of this “visual you” is conveyed through your body language. Remember, every tiny movement and action of yours is being observed from the moment you enter the room, sit down, interact, and finally go out. Practicing beforehand in the mirror is a great way to hone this skill.

You must maintain a poised and active posture throughout. Also, observe your gestures when you speak.

  • Keep your chin parallel to the floor and spine erect, and make confident moves. Maintain open handed gestures to build trust and rapport with your interviewers.
  • Make meaningful eye contact with one interviewer at a time for 3-6 seconds.
  • Lastly, no matter how stressed or nervous you may feel, give a dazzling, confident smile to put yourself and the interviewer at ease. A real genuine smile will engage your zygomatic muscles that are responsible for bringing laugh lines near the eyes, communicating friendliness and openness.
  • Dress in your best formal way. Choose conservative shades, crisp clothes and minimal accessories. Avoid wearing strong fragrances and keep your hair off your face.

Infuse Self-Confidence

If you are an otherwise grumbling person, keep your thoughts at bay while you are preparing for your interview. Employ a simple mantra of “think well and feel good”. Recall your past achievements. Believe in the positive you. Keep track of small events that are directly proportional to your confidence levels. On the big day itself, ensure that you have done the following:

  • Organize your interview supplies, documents, and make sure to carry extra copies of your CV.
  • Don’t skip a healthy breakfast as a good breakfast improves the functioning of your brain and boosts alertness.
  • Reach at least 15 minutes before the scheduled time. You need to acquaint yourself with the environment to fit into it.
  • Check for bad breath and utilize the additional time to freshen yourself up by using a mouthwash.

By implementing the above stated interview tips in your preparation strategy, you should be able to perform assertively and with greater ease on your interview day.

You’re sitting back in your chair, feeling utterly and completely defeated. Your interviewer sits across from you, his arms akimbo and giving you a gaze that clearly communicates that he is not impressed with your performance so far. The last ten minutes that have passed since the start of the interview felt like an hour long instead. Murphy’s Law has seemed to be the most applicable law of the day thus far.

Have you ever found yourself in such a situation during your job interview? [more…]It is entirely understandable that you would begin to get nervous or agitated, especially in this time of dwindling job vacancies and career opportunities. Fret not – here are a few interview tips that will help you to recover quickly and get the attention of your interviewer back:

 

“Keep Calm, Take a Deep Breath and Re-engage”

 

At a certain point in the job interview, maybe the interviewer lost you and began to zone out in the midst of your rambling. Some tell-tale signs include:

 

Fiddling with his/her iPhone or Blackberry;

Examining his/her fingernails or the surroundings;

Giving you a disapproving and uninterested stare;

Nodding vaguely but not giving you eye contact;

Not responding in appropriate fashion to your stories, or

Simply staring into space and not responding

 

This is certainly bad news – it means that he or she has ascertained that whatever you have delivered so far, in response to the interview questions, are not a good fit to what he or she is looking for. Stop yourself and take a breather. Smile, and re-engage your interviewer again, so you can get back on track.

 

Ask relevant questions: One good way to re-engage your interviewer is to ask him a relevant question about himself/herself or the company. Ask your interviewer how the company culture is like, or how it feels like to work there. By doing so, you will re-emphasize your interest in the company, and also prompt your interviewer to give you more information to use in demonstrating your suitability for the company.

 

Change the topic: Another way to re-engage your interviewer would be to stop what you’re currently talking about, change to another subject, and keep your new story short. If it is evident that what you are currently talking about is boring your interviewer, switching to something else might work in capturing your interviewer back. Bear in mind not to get lost in another long narrative, though – try to be as concise as possible, and ask for your interviewer’s input as much as you can.

 

Take a short break to recover: The worst thing you could possibly do, of course, is to completely freak out and start rambling and going off on wild tangents. If you’re getting a huge case of the jitters, you might even want to request for a brief toilet break – politely. This might or might not work, depending on the interviewer’s patience. If it does, head straight to the toilet and splash your face with cold water. Take long, slow breaths, and gather your thoughts again. Run through what you want to tell the interviewer in your head, and make sure you return looking and feeling more confident. It is far better to take a break and re-group than to push forward in a losing battle.

 

Demonstrate your interest in the job strongly – even if you are under or over qualified: If you chose to interview for a job that you are either under or over qualified for, you must have a very good reason for taking that chance. Make sure you prove it to your interviewer. Demonstrate your interest in the job strongly by displaying your knowledge in the related areas, or by matching the skills that you know you have to the skills that are required of the job for the benefit of the interviewer. Do not expect the interviewer to connect the dots for you – show that you mean business by taking the initiative.

 

In sum, never throw in the towel, even when all seems lost. By taking the above steps, you will be able to take the reins and steer the interview back to a more positive direction that would definitely increase your chances of getting hired.

You have just received the much anticipated phone call from an interested employer for an interview, so what’s next? The thought of attending a job interview can be so nerve-wracking that you may actually lose sleep over it. While thinking positively is certainly one way to psyche yourself up for the interview, it will important to put in some effort and be well-prepared for it.

You may think of it as a dialogue session, where your interviewer is interested to find out more about your education background and past work experiences to see if you are fit for the job. Though this is basically what it is, do not assume a passive role and attend the interview without any preparation. As an interviewee, you need to take responsibility of the outcome of the interview and do your due diligence in your preparation. This interview is an opportunity for you to show your strengths and how they can value add to your potential employer.

Here are five essential tasks that you are encouraged to check off for your preparation: [more…]

1.Anticipate questions

Anticipate the questions (that the interviewer may be asking you. Make a list of questions and practice your responses. Standard interview questions include “Tell me more about yourself”, “Why do you want to work for us?”, “What is your biggest weakness?” and “Why should we hire you over another person?” Get a friend to do a mock interview with you and to rehearse all the possible scenarios and questions. Take a video of the interview, and replay the video to watch yourself. Observe your body language – were you being too fidgety? Or showing a lack of eye contact? Polish your presentation accordingly and work on a smooth delivery.

 

 

2.Revise your résumé and cover letter

The interviewer is very likely to ask you to elaborate on what you have mentioned in your résumé and cover letter. Revising your résumé and cover letter is necessary, especially so when you have sent out different versions for various jobs applications.

 

3.Research on the company

It is important to have some good knowledge of the company that has invited you for the interview. Do some research on the company, find out the company’s culture and understand the challenges that are currently facing the company and industry. Knowing this can help you tune your replies better and where you can contribute your strengths to.

 

 

4.Prepare questions to ask the interviewer

“Do you have any questions for me?” Most, if not all interviewers will ask this question towards the end of the interview. Your questions will communicate how much interest you have in the job. This is also an opportunity for you to find out more information about the job and company. Ask questions to learn more about the industry, company or job related challenges, as well as to clarify the job’s responsibilities. The answers to these questions will help you to be more informed if this is a good place to work before the offer comes in.

 

5.Get your right clothes ready

You do not want to wake up on the day of your interview and find out that you do not have the right attire for the interview. Prepare the right clothes for the interview before the actual day. The first impression is made in than 30 seconds and is decided upon your dressing. Leave a positive impression by looking neat and smart, wearing attire that fits well and is well pressed.

Make the next interview count.

Have you been interviewed recently? We hope you can share with us about it!

 

Reference

http://jobsearch.about.com/od/interviewsnetworking/ss/job-interview.htm
Arlene Bastion, The Book of Jobs: Seeking, Getting, Keeping and… Loving Our Jobs. Published by: Armour Publishing. Year of publication: 2009.

You might also like: “3 Ways an Interview is Like a First Date”

1. You’re Dressed To Impress

Do: Put more effort into planning your outfit

Don’t: Whip out those false eyelashes or the tie with skull-and-crossbones on it

 

Why: It’s great that you are putting in the effort to help your interviewer remember you better. But you want it to be for the right reasons. It’s not a fashion parade. Interviewers like personality but they don’t want your individuality shoved in their faces. Like a first date, it’s important to understand what the other party is like. If your company is a respected bank, going for the interview in a plunging, cleavage-bearing LBD may not be the best option. [more…]

 

2. You Celebrate Your Victory Too Early

Do: Decompress from the stress of the interview

Don’t: Make that call to your best friend while you’re still on the premises

 

Why: You don’t just make an impression when you walk into the interview room. You could be leaving one right until you exit the building. Just as how you’d wait until you’re out of earshot to gush about your date to your friend, the last thing you want is for someone from management overhearing you brag about “how you just nailed it” as you make the call in the office toilet. This will come across as extremely cocky and off-putting — and it’s a sure way of ensuring you won’t get called back.

 

3. You Go On and On … and On

Do: Mention about some of the more notable projects you worked on in your previous company

Don’t: Talk about how you led your rowing team to victory when you were 17

 

Why: You’ve done some wonderful things with your life. Great! But just as you don’t tell your date your entire life story during your first meeting with him or her, the same rule applies for a job interview. When you have just 15 minutes with your interviewer, the keyword here is “edit”. Talk about your role in the successful management of key projects with your previous companies and, more importantly, ask pertinent questions about the one you’re interviewing for throughout the interview (and not just at the end). That way, you’ll come across as plugged-in, engaged and sincere.

With a little bit of preparation and practice, job interviews and first dates don’t have to be nail-biting experiences. Just remember that, in either case, it’ll do you well not to celebrate any victories until you know for certain the other party is willing to make that crucial commitment to you.

 

Share with us your interview experience or you can refer to our Interviews Section for more tips.

5 Best Places In The World To Work

These companies sure belong to the greener, much greener, side; they go the extra mile in making the workplace a fun, interactive environment to inspire staff creativity and productivity. Bosses, take note. [more…]

 

1. ANZ Centre (Melbourne, Australia)

This banking headquarters is anything but boring or staid with its award-winning office design. A modern interpretation of an urban campus, the building is made up of “hubs” — each with its own look and feel, each serving different work purposes.

 

2. Google (Zurich, Switzerland)

Google offices around the world are renowned for their insanely cool work environment, but this one takes design to a whole new level of ridiculousness. Apart from slides and fireman’s poles that take you from one floor to another, this office features a giant hammock, a meeting room filled with hot air balloons, and a dark aquarium room in which employees can relax in chairs or bathtubs.

3. DTAC (Bangkok, Thailand)

When a company has an entire level named Funfloor, you know it’s a good place to work in. Comprising a mix of fun and games — running track, indoor soccer, karaoke, concert theatre — the Funfloor is the perfect place for relaxation and team-bonding. This telecommunications firm also dedicated a massive area to a circular library-amphitheatre.

4. Airbnb (San Francisco, USA)

The prouder you are of your company, the higher your work productivity and morale — this travel-rentals service is a fine example of that. Their meeting rooms are fashioned after some of their own listings, like a mushroom cabin in California, and an art-filled apartment in New York.

5. Bahnhof (Stockholm, Sweden)

James Bond himself would need a license to work here. Located 30m underground, what used to be an anti-atomic shelter was transformed into the White Mountain Office — a stunning workplace, whose design was inspired by Bond flicks, that looks more like a sci-fi movie set rather than a data centre. Too cool.

 

5 Worst Places In The World To Work

Of course, on the other end of the spectrum lies some work conditions so terrible, they make us desperate to cling on to our existing uninspiring work environments.

 

1. Disgruntled Employees = Disgruntled Customers

We’ve all heard horror stories of what goes on behind those permanent grins and heavy makeup, but this particular airline in the US seems to piss off as many passengers as it does employees. The latter have cited issues like “extremely dysfunctional pay scale system” and the lack of job security as reasons of their dissatisfaction.

 

2. Animal Abuse

There’s a whole list of cosmetics companies, including a few notable giants, that adopt unethical animal-testing practices. Some of them have a long track record of using rabbits as test subjects, dropping substances into their eyes and force-feeding them poisonous chemicals.

 

3. Incompetent Upper Management

There are few things more rage-inducing than working for incompetent upper management — a sentiment that the employees of a car-rental service in the US are all too familiar with. According to some employees of the company, the upper management not only pushes the staff to do the impossible, but also seems to promote a toxic environment in which the smartest backstabber wins.

 

4. Outright Corruption

It’s no surprise oil companies would be on this list, but one particular US-owned corporation has been consistently making the headlines for the wrong reasons. From its anti-gay employment practices to outright corruption, this company has destroyed lives while pocketing profits by the billions.

 

5. Extreme Lack Of Employee Rights

You might want to stay away from fast food after hearing this: employees of certain fast-food restaurants have confirmed that it’s not uncommon to cook, prepare and serve food while sick. As if that’s not bad enough, a study showed that 90 percent of the employees are not offered paid sick leave, and that there is less chance for a promotion for women and immigrants.

 —

How does your office look like? Share with us here!