Think you have done well in your recent job interview? Great! But you’re not done yet. Acing a job interview is one thing, but to actually make a good lasting impression on the hiring managers is quite another. So, how can you make sure that you stand out from the rest? The answer lies in your thank-you email.

Why It Matters

It may look menial, but a thank-you email sent after an interview can give you a better shot at landing your dream job. A study by Robert Half suggested that thank-you emails are important to 80 % of HR managers in making a final hiring decision. Unfortunately, however, a CareerBuilder survey showed that after an interview, 57% of job applicants do not write thank-you emails. Although it is not an official requirement, a thank-you email can give you a plus point in the eye of recruiters, as proven by the aforementioned research.

 

Writing a Thank-You Email

What you say and how you say it can make or break your interview follow-up email. Here are a few essential parts to consider: subject line, personalized introduction, appreciation remark, experience summary, and your readiness for the next step.

 

Subject Line

The subject line is the first thing people see in their email inbox. You should utilize this to communicate the message’s meaning. You can get readers to click on your subject line in a variety of ways. Make it personal by using the interviewer’s name instead of a broader term like “hiring manager”. Here are some examples of good subject lines you can use:

  • Thank you, [Interviewer’s Name]!
  • I enjoyed learning more about [Company Name]
  • Thanks for the interview yesterday

 

Read Also: Which One is More Important: Degree Certificate or Skill Certificate?

 

Begin with Personal Introduction

You may already be familiar with an introduction as a part of an email, but this one for a thank you email may differ a bit. Do not go into the body of your email right away. Begin with a brief greeting, keeping it as warm or formal as the interview. Again, remember to use the interviewer’s name instead of referring to their position. This simple act indicates that you paid attention to the interview and how the interviewer introduced themselves. 

 

Show Gratitude

Since it is a thank you email, your aim is to show gratitude. Something along the lines of, “Thank you for the opportunity and your time earlier. It was nice to discuss the position of <job title> with you directly”, would be nice. If possible, double-check this part and make sure you do not give off a self-centered vibe. If you think you use too much “I”, then you may want to rephrase it.

Reminder on Your Experience

Recap what makes you so qualified for the position within your thank-you email. This may be a few sentences that summarize what you discussed in the interview, or it could be a link to some samples of work that support your experience. Describe what appeals to you most about the role and explain why. This way, your email following an interview will feel more personalized. Refer to your talents and experience and demonstrate how you will utilize them to help your potential employer achieve their goals.

 

Willingness to Follow the Next Step

One last crucial step to close a thank you email is showing your willingness to follow the next step, regardless of the final decision. In fact, this can actually be a factor worth considering by hiring managers, since you demonstrate an eagerness. Show the hiring manager that you are available for further discussion and that you are eager to start working soon. If you have a notice period at your current job, it may be worth mentioning that as well. 

 

If You Change Your Mind

There are cases where you may change your mind about the job after an interview that you become hesitant to proceed further. Instead of ghosting the hiring manager, you can talk about it in a thank-you email. If the interview made you think that the position does not suit you, express this explicitly in your email. Other than saving them time to exclude you in the final decision-making, doing this will show honesty and genuine appreciation.

 

When Should You Hit Send?

Sending a thank-you note while you are still fresh in the interviewer’s memory is ideal. You need to send the email within 24 hours following the interview. This might take place on the same day as the interview or the next day. If the interview is on Friday, send a thank-you email that afternoon or plan it for Monday morning. Formal emails sent on the weekend can be a turn-off and an early sign of not appreciating day offs. 

 

Make sure your email comes across as genuine. Even a formal thank-you email following an interview should sound like it is written by a real person rather than a template. Hopefully, these tips can be of help. Best of luck!

 

Read Also: Useful Tips for Writing a Counteroffer

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