12 Industries with the Most Job Opportunities in 2021 

The COVID-19 crisis has made the world come to a halt. The employment sector in particular was hit hard, as companies ceased recruiting and some even laid off employees. At the same time, some brick-and-mortar stores were forced to shift and adapt to e-commerce practices because people were not allowed to leave their homes. Fortunately, after a few tough and challenging months, businesses are managing to bounce back and pivot their models.

According to the Seek report, there are a number of industries that are experiencing job growth in the wake of COVID-19. The period between August 2019 and August 2020 saw job ads decrease by 29.1 percent. However, through April 2020, the employment marketplace is reporting that job demand across all states are recovering at different rates, which some states are already returning to pre-COVID job ad levels. 

See also: 7 Hard Skills That’ll Guarantee You Job 

As per Seek report, there are 3 industries which have experienced the highest job growth, including Information and Communication, Technology, Human Resources and Recruitment, Banking and Finance industries. If you are looking for a new job or career, considering HR job or career in finance might be a good choice during the pandemic. If you want to try other careers, here are 10 industries with the most jobs to consider in 2021 (with job ad percentage change by industry)

  • Advertising, arts and media with job ads grow by 16 percent
  • Consulting and strategy with job ads grow by 13 percent 
  • Human resources and recruitment with job ads grow by 12 percent 
  • Legal with job ads grow by 11 percent 
  • Banking and financial services with job ads grow by 7 percent 
  • Farming, animals, and conservation with job ads grow by 7 percent 
  • Design and architecture with job ads grow by 6 percent 
  • Engineering with job ads grow by 5 percent 
  • Marketing and communications with job ads grow by 5 percent 
  • Government and defence with job ads grow by 5 percent
  • Information and communication technology with job ads grow by 4 percent 
  • Healthcare and medical with job ads grow by 1 percent 

New job opportunities are emerging and demand for certain jobs is rising. Don’t miss your chance because the right time to change is today! If you are looking for assistance in career change or growth, our partner Talentvis is here to help. Talentvis is a team of expert recruiters, helping job seekers navigate their current career landscape and find the perfect job. Talentvis could be the RIGHT partner for talents like you – collaborate today

Read also: Career Decision Making Tips for College Graduates 

Top 5 Careers to Consider for Recent College Graduates 

Hi grads, are you feeling stuck in your journey to find that first “real” job? 

Stepping out of college into the real world has never been easy. Fortunately, many college graduates are now being aided with basic work applications with training, apprenticeship, or internship during their college lives. With strong background and certification, getting into real work of work might become easier. Especially today, the world is in strong hiring mode so there will be a lot of opportunity to try. 

Here are 10 best entry-level jobs for recent college graduates based on a LinkedIn survey. LinkedIn has analysed its data on user-profiles and job openings to present, among other things, the list of the most popular jobs for new grads. 

  1. Healthcare 

Healthcare careers are part of the fastest growing industry for job growth and development in the world. This trend is expected to continue over the next decade, especially due to the current Covid-19 situation. Projections from the U.S. bureau of Labor Statistics show that healthcare jobs are expected to increase by 18 percent from 2016 through 2026, meaning that the industry will add about 2.4 million new healthcare jobs. 

The top medical careers in demand include: 

  • physicians, 
  • registered nurses, 
  • physical therapists, 
  • respiratory therapists, 
  • home health aides, 
  • medical assistant, 
  • physician assistant, 
  • healthcare information technologist, and
  • pharmacy technician. 

See also: Job vs. Career: Life-long Adventure after Graduation 

  1. Retail 

While many retailers have been forced to make cuts to their workforce due to temporary or permanent closures caused by the pandemic, other retail companies are hiring thousands of workers to meet increased consumer demand.  According to LinkedIn, there are approximately 170K+ open entry-level jobs and 5K+ open internships in retail industries. 

  1. Software and IT services 

As companies scramble to adapt to a tight IT job market, they are doing whatever they can to attract top tech talent. For some that means getting a head start in filling their most in-demand roles, which range from data-focused to security-related positions. 

  1. Manufacturing 

It’s no secret that the manufacturing sector has a major impact on the world’s economy. For example, some companies and educational institutions opened their doors to students, parents, teachers and community leaders to highlight modern manufacturing. LinkedIn projected that there are approximately 65K+ open entry-level jobs and 3.5K+ open internships in this industry. 

  1. Education 

iCIMS survey revealed that the overall hiring trends from April to July saw increment by 70 percent. The education sector has picked up over the past several weeks but the number of hires made within that time period is still notably lower than expected. While LinkedIn noted that there are approximately 2K+ open internships positions graduates can apply and 35K+ open entry-level jobs that need to be fulfilled. 

Read also: Here is How Employers Determine a Newcomer’s Salary

Here is How Employers Determine a Newcomer’s Salary 

Did you just pass your first interview and now you are wondering what you should say on your salary negotiation?

First, congratulations on your smooth interview. Second, you’ve come to the right place. In this article, you’ll learn how employers offer salary to candidates they’d like to hire.

While most candidates expect a 10 percent to 20 percent salary increase during a job-switch, not every organisation is able to meet that expectation. Besides considering the candidate’s qualification; work experiences, current and expected salary, an organisation has to review their salary structure and internal equity to determine a salary offer.  These are usually not openly discussed, hence most candidates are not aware of such considerations at the back-end.

See also: Negotiating Your Salary The Wrong Ways

Salary Structure

Every established organisation has its own internal salary structure. Salary structure is created based on market data to ensure salary competitiveness within the same industry. This is also known as analyzing external equity.

Some companies might be more transparent than others on sharing their structures to candidates. Basically, each position in an organisation has its own grade or level and a salary range. The salary range will consist of a minimum pay rate and maximum pay rate. For a fully competent candidate, the most ideal and competitive rate will be at the median of the range.

A candidate who is new to a role typically receives a salary which is lower in the range while a very experienced candidate might receive an offer which is above the median.

Companies avoid offering salaries near the maximum pay rate since that would limit the salary growth of a candidate in subsequent years. Once an employee reaches the maximum within the salary range, they will enter the red circle and are no longer eligible for pay increase.

Internal Equity

An organisation also has to consider internal equity when determining the salary for a candidate.  Internal equity refers to reviewing current salaries of existing employees holding the same position and job responsibilities within an organisation. It ensures that employees are rewarded fairly across the organisation.

To illustrate the point of internal equity: there are two accountants – Sarah and Adam working in the organisation. Sarah earns $3000 a month and has a bachelor degree with 3 years of relevant experience; while Adam earns $5000 a month, has a bachelor degree with 5 years of relevant experience. After learning the gap of experience and pay, the hiring manager will likely offer $4000 per month salary for a candidate who has a Bachelor degree and 4 years of relevant experience in her/his previous organisation. This can be predicted based on internal equity where salary is calculated based on the candidate’s experience and education. 

As a job seeker, when receiving an offer whereby the salary is lower than your expectation, you should try to understand their pay philosophy. Companies might not be able to share all the information with you but you can obtain a better understanding of their pay structure if you pay close attention to what they offer during salary negotiation.

You should also consider the entire compensation package. Base salary is only one component so it is important to understand the other benefits or perks offered, such as additional allowances and bonus payout.

Most importantly, you should understand the growth opportunity within the organisation. If an organisation strongly believes in developing their employees, it will still be a worthy consideration over others that only offer a marginally higher salary.

Read also: Where Did All the Money Go? Smart Guide to Manage Your Salary

Networking: How to Make Yourself Memorable

Among the goals of every networking encounter is to leave a lasting positive impression. Not only a positive impression can help networkers to be more marketable, but it can also help establish and cultivate ongoing relationships with professionals in the field. For example, when you are remembered positively by someone, they will likely refer you as “contacts” and tell others about you, keep you updated on job leads, and provide you with valuable information about your field of interest.

The question is, how to make yourself memorable? 

The key to this is to grab the attention of your interlocutors as early as possible before their attention gets into something else. According to BBC Health, a person’s attention span varies depending on tasks, responsibilities, or time they have. Some might have a longer or shorter attention span. However, if you can tell a person the most important information that she/he MUST know about you in a few seconds (commonly 30-second), you’ll likely be remembered better. 

This interaction is known as 30-second pitch or the answer to the question “tell me about yourself”. A 30-second pitch is a brief introduction that tells a contact who you are and offers a few interesting and relevant details about your professional background and interest. It is more useful at public events, such as career expos and mixers, where networking encounters tend to be brief. An extended version of this conversation (your one-minute pitch) can also be used as an introduction in an interview. 

See also: Which One is More Important: Degree Certificate or Skill Certificate?

Your 30-second pitch should include the following elements: 

  • An introduction (give your name and current school/job as appropriate to the situation) 
  • Your relevant professional interests and the relevant aspects of your professional background 
  • The reason that are you interested in speaking with the contact
  • Your interest in having a follow-up conversation (inquire about the best way to get in touch with the contact in the future)

Here are other tips to get your 30-second pitch right and valuable:

  • Ask questions – Your pitch should feel like a natural, albeit succinct, conversation. Do not rattle off a list of your professional experience for 30 consecutive seconds. Instead, allow room for the contact to join the discussion. Feel free to ask a few strategic questions and listen carefully to their comments and respond accordingly. 
  • Be direct – Do not assume that your contact will make the right inferences about you. If you want them to know that you are passionate about healthcare reform, say, ‘‘I am passionate about health care reform.’’ 
  • Practice – While your pitch should never sound rehearsed or robotic, practising in front of a mirror and/or with another person will help you remember important information when you encounter an unexpected networking opportunity. 

Connection through networking is one of the best ways for you to get a job of your interest, thus remember to always use 30-second pitch tips. 

Read also: Informational Interview (Part 2): How to Interview Professionally?

6 Reasons Why Recruiters Avoid Hiring Candidates with Employment Gap 

Are you a dedicated job seeker but have an employment gap in your resume? Here’s what you need to know.

Job candidates with years of employment gap are often perceived as an inadequate candidate by recruiters. Difficulty of job placement is cited to be the number one reason why recruiters avoid employment gaps in resumes. Another reason is that individuals who work freelance or are out of work to pursue their own ventures are often seen as having a lack of responsibility. Here are some other reasons why employers avoid hiring candidates with years of employment gap in the resume. 

  • More training – Recruiters often avoid hiring a person with a gap in resume for a senior-level position because they might require training which could add more work for HR and teams. Higher position needs professionals to do the job, so talents with a gap might have a lower chance of getting hired here. 
  • Employment gap means a hard time to verify employment background and it will be an extra task for a hiring manager. 
  • Recruiters often perceive that when you are out of work, your skills might not be good enough. 
  • If you quit the job to build your own business and fail, a recruiter might think that you are not good enough on your own and it could be a weak point because an organisation would prefer hiring a reliable person. 
  • Hiring qualified talents with a gap in their resume is more costly than hiring freshers. Fresh graduates can be paid less because they have no work experience, while qualified individuals with gaps might demand higher pay.  
  • Recruiters often fear low performance, instability, or unreliability at work if they hire someone with years of an employment gap. 

See also: What To Expect during a Job Interview?

Don’t be discouraged just yet – how to handle employment gap 

There is a way for job seekers to get employed even when they stop working for years. One way to hide employment gaps without lying is to use a Functional Resume. Concentrate on your skills and accomplishments and downplay when and where you did them. However, there are times when employers or headhunters ask you for a chronological resume or a separate work history. If this is the case, jump to trick number two. 

If employers or recruiters ask for work history, the chance for you to showcase your skills on paper might be low. But you can always showcase it in realtime. Thus, make sure you complete a project or certification before applying for the new job. This will help sell your skills again after years of no career advancement in the workplace. But remember, with those years of gap, applying for senior-level might be tricky even when you have completed some of certifications. It will be wiser to apply at a lower level and scale through time when you are employed. 

Once you have addressed the gap and explained what you did during that time but the conversation continues in a direction you are not comfortable with, you have the option of saying, “I’d prefer not to go into more detail. I am very interested in sharing details of my work experience, however.” From there, you can supply another anecdote from your work history that makes you qualified for the position. 

If the conversation continues to make you feel uncomfortable, you might want to consider ending the interview by saying, “I’m not comfortable with where our conversation is headed so this might not be the right fit. Thank you for your time.” This will not only show that you appreciate recruiter’s opportunity given to you for an interview but also show that you respect both of your time and recruiter’s. 

Ending a job interview unilaterally might decrease your chance to be hired. But it is better than explaining yourself in a way that the recruiter could not understand. If you are looking for a job that fits you best, check here and you might find a better employment opportunity than the one you are applying for now. 

Read also: 5 Things Recruiters Know that Job Seekers Don’t 

What To Expect during a Job Interview? 

If it is your first time to come to a job interview, it is normal if you think that interview is nerve-wracking. In such a case, knowing a few best practices can calm your nerves and keep you sharp. The first step is getting familiar with types of questions you’ll be asked, which include:

  • Background questions – These questions help hiring managers get an overview of your experience, goals and why you’re interested in the company. 
  • Behavioural questions – These are designed to uncover your past “behaviours” in different work situations. These questions also help employers decide whether you will fit company culture. 
  • Situational questions – Your answers to these questions should demonstrate your ability to overcome challenging workplace scenarios. 

See also: The Power of Informational Interviews

It will be all about you.

Besides the interview questions above, you can expect that a job interview will be all about you – as a job seeker. Therefore, set aside shyness or reticence and prepare to explain yourself thoroughly. First impressions always count, especially on particular occasions like job interviews. Practice and school yourself on what to do when employers ask illegal questions, such as queries about your marital status, children, or health issues. Understanding what you should disclose and what should be kept as secret will leave a good impression to recruiters. 

If you have an employment gap, explain it.

It is always a good policy to be honest about employment gaps, especially if it is lengthy. Having an employment gap will not decrease your employment chance if you know how to communicate it. Thus, be honest on why you take the gap, is it because you are working to find a new job, volunteering, becoming a parent or caregiver, or travelling? These reasons might be viewed in your favour. When explaining this, remember to emphasise the skills you’ve gained during employment gaps that will put value to the company if they hire you.

Be ready to discuss salary. 

When it comes to salary discussion, don’t disclose exactly what you expected. What you need to do is to prepare yourself by knowing what you are worth based on your qualifications and your salary history. You can also consult authoritative sources, such as Payscale. Once again, don’t feel it is your role to bring up specific numbers, but if you are asked, be prepared with salary ranges, based on your research. 

You are also required to ask questions. 

As the interview is winding up, the hiring manager might turn the table and ask if you have questions for them. When the time comes, make sure you take the chance to dig the company deeper, such as understanding the work hours, company culture, etc. Check here to know what questions you should ask. Nonetheless, it can be totally okay to finish with a non-question grace note, such as expressing that you’ve enjoyed the discussion and look forward to the next step in the hiring process. 

Read also: 3 Reasons Why Showcasing Your Personality during Job Interview is Essential

5 Things Recruiters Know that Job Seekers Don’t 

Do you often find that recruiters and hiring managers are intimidating? Don’t worry, they are not. They simply want to give you the best hiring experience in their own way. What you should pay more attention to is the secret behind their actions, because there are certain things that hiring managers do not want to reveal in front of their candidates. According to Dandan Zhu, Founder and CEO at DG Recruit, here are a few things recruiters and hiring managers know that job seekers don’t. 

#1 – All basic qualifications having been met 

“The smartest people do not actually end up succeeding the most in real life, while the dumbest people also have just as good as a chance to survive, if not thrive.” 

It means that B or C level students might be as good as A+ students in real life.  In other words, when it comes to the workplace, this means that the most talented and technically savvy engineer doesn’t always become the CTO. Most of the time, it is usually the politically admired and personally connected talent who wins and progresses into the C-suite. Basic qualifications are important to be considered as a feasible candidate, but success is dedicated more by one’s ability to influence, actively listen and respond appropriately, level of social etiquette, and general accentedness by their peers and superiors than one’s technical scores. 

See also: Job vs. Career: Life-long Adventure after Graduation

#2 – HR people are not that important in the hiring hierarchy 

“As you become a serious professional, you can utilise LinkedIn to directly approach hiring managers.” 

Most graduates might think that HR people deserve the utmost respect as they were the gateway to their future career prospects. Yet, Zhu emphasised that it is the hiring manager that makes the utmost decision, while HR is the service and administrative function in the process. Hiring manager dictates everything, including who to interview, what price to pay them, who to hire, and which headhunters to utilise. 

#3 – Job applicants can negotiate and leverage other offers to great effect 

“In today’s world, it is all about the etiquette and manner in which you communicate.” 

As a job applicant, you might be scared of upsetting prospective employers about disclosing where else you are going for job interviews and how much money you actually want. Yet, if a high-demand labour market where the supply of jobs outstrips candidates available, you actually hold a lot more power than employers do. 

Therefore, it is vital for you to research your niche and whether the position you are applying for is currently in the high demand labour market or not. Only then, you know your worth to negotiate and be transparent about offers. If handled appropriately, this will increase employers’ desire for you, not penalise you for looking greedy or not interested. Communication is the mother of all success when it comes to negotiation, thus master it. 

#4 – Interview your interviewers harder 

“Don’t be scared to say what’s on your mind. If something important to you does not align with your future employer, things won’t work out anyways, so it is better to know before you take the job to begin with.” 

Commonly, candidates are so scared of losing job offers or being looked at as needy or demanding so they don’t actually say what’s on their mind. This, however, could hurt your success on the job even if you manage to get a great salary and offer. Chances are, you probably agreed to something that you did not fully understand or align with.

That’s why it’s your prerogative to be a strong communicator. Get the answers you truly need during interviews by asking tough questions that are detailed and specific. This is where you’ll be spending your next few years; you better be aggressive in how you get it out!

#5 – Interview even if you don’t need to 

“Go out and interview even if you don’t need to.” 

Due to loyalty, fear, laziness, and/or arrogance, most candidates refuse to proactively learn about what opportunities are available. Don’t be like these most candidates. No matter if you need to look or not, once you hit a certain amount of experience in your role, it is time to take your head out of the sand and start interviewing, even if just for your own education. 

Read also: What to Do When You Hear Nothing from a Job Application?

What to Do When You Hear Nothing from a Job Application? 

Have you ever sent resumes to some companies but none call you back? Or, did you hear radio silence after an interview? If yes, you are not alone. CareerBuilder survey found that a staggering 75 percent of job seekers said they did not hear back from a position they have applied for. The reasons for not getting a follow-up generally comes from employers or recruiters themselves and not the job seekers. Some of the reasons are as follows: 

  • Employer has lost job seeker’s job application
  • Human resources policy that does not allow company employees to respond to any inquiries from interview candidates. 
  • Lack of consideration to not notifying candidates, except for those employer’s interested most. 
  • Change in hiring plans, such as teams getting cut.

See also: Dos & Don’ts when Asking Questions to Recruiter

Hearing bad news is a bummer but not getting a response at all, especially from an industry you expected, is worse. The good news is that there is something you can do about it: be proactive. All it takes to get the ball rolling again is a little push in the right direction. Here are some of the ways you should try: 

  • If possible, contact the recruiter or hiring managers and ask if they can give you a quick update regarding your application status. It will remind them that it has been a while since they’ve worked on their hiring responsibilities. 
  • If you apply through an applicant tracking system, check the system to see if your status has changed, for example from ‘submitted’ to ‘under review’. If it hasn’t changed, the problem lies in your resume, thus it is better to rewrite the resume and apply again when appropriate. 
  • If you have a contact inside the company, ask them to track down the hiring manager. See if they can get a status update for you. 
  • If the job was posted online, check the web site if the job is still listed. If it is not, the job opening might have been closed or they have already filled the position with somebody else. At this point, you should move on and start anew. 

Read also: 3 Reasons Why Showcasing Your Personality during Job Interview is Essential

Tips to Find a Job that Fits and Suits You 

Chester Elton, an executive coach and author, said that too many people (job seekers) get caught up in the company’s reputation and brand. The truth is, working in a high-value company is not always a good fit for everyone. Elton suggested that if job seekers want to find a job that fits their personality, they should question more about whether their own brand and personality align with the company values, not their reputation or brand. 

Here are 4 tips from Elton for job seekers who yearn to work in a job that suits and fits them. 

1- Create a mentor network 

Having a mentor network is not only a good place to get advice, but also where you can turn to when it’s time to find a new job. You can include a mix of friends, family, classmates, professors and other advisors in your network. As your professional and personal networks expand, make sure to connect with people both in-person and online to develop a mentor network that is right for you. You should also expand your circle and select a diverse network. Be proactive about who you choose as a mentor because different people can be helpful at various stages of your career. 

See also: 10 Suitable Jobs for YOU Who are Bad Communicators 

2- Take a personality assessment 

Your personality is your biggest asset. It can certainly tip the scale in your favour during an interview process. You can use the assessment result of the personality test to target companies and roles that match your values and personality, thus you can work in a field that you enjoy the most. Here is one of the best and free personality tests you can try. 

3- Research company culture 

Matching your value to a company is key to success. When the company culture aligns with your needs and values as an employee, you will likely have better performance, engagement, and better teamwork organisation. Company culture is also the key to your own wellbeing, thus keep in mind to conduct research on the culture of the firm you want to work at. 

4- Get out fast if it does not fit 

While your first job is important, do not be afraid to make a change if it does not work as you expected. You should be your biggest advocate and adviser because a job that irritates you will only result negatively to your own personal and professional life. For instance, if you stay longer in a job that you do not enjoy, your stress level might increase significantly. Consequently, not only will you have lower productivity, but it will also affect the relationship with the people around you. Another alternative, you can speak to your manager about reshaping the position and if it does not work, you might need to seek a new opportunity elsewhere. 

Read also: Pros and Cons of Working in the Journalism Industry 

10 Suitable Jobs for YOU Who are Bad Communicators 

Everyone has their own characteristics, skills, and preferences. Some people love crowded places, parties, and to be the centre of attention. Owing to their good communication skills, such people might find it relatively easy to get a job and maintain social status. Meanwhile, some others prefer to spend time alone, away from crowded places, and maintain a low-key life. Generally, these people would love to work in a quiet place since they don’t like to be involved in small talks and are not good communicators.

Which one are you? If you belong to the second group and are currently looking for a job that does not require much talking or good communication skills, here are 10 jobs that require low communication skills. 

See also: Job Search Tips in Time of Crisis 

Note: All the salary cited in this article is calculated by Payscale. Your salary can be lower or higher depending on your skills, education, and job experiences. 

  1. Locomotive engineers 

Do you like trains? If you like trains and have bad communication skills, this job will be perfect. This job requires zero speaking duties and you do not need to deal with a lot of people unless you need to, such as co-workers to report on some important stuff. 

The average salary for this job is $92,321 annually with bonuses and profit sharing. 

  1. Forest fire lookout (tower watcher) 

Working with less than 5 people. Sit and watch nature. Sometimes, you can even hear the birds chirping. What a dream job for someone who loves serenity and nature. Being a tower watcher requires far less communicating with others but you need to have high alertness.  

The average salary for this job is $41,067 annually. 

  1. Freelancer 

If you have some skills but do not want to work in the cubicle office, this will be perfect for you. Although you might be required to communicate with your clients, working as a freelancer gives you more freedom in terms of flexible hours and you can choose with whom you want to work with. 

The average salary for this job depends on the type of freelance job you do. Generally, a freelance writer is paid $24.07 hourly, while a freelance consultant is at an average $30.52 hourly pay rates. 

  1. Quality Assurance tester

Quality Assurance (QA) tester is a fun work to do that does not require much talking. Basically, you are responsible for playing video games, applications or other projects and write reports about it, such as if there are any bugs or glitches. 

The average salary for this job is $55,520 annually with bonuses and profit sharing. 

  1. Mail delivery service  

Although you have to walk or drive a long road, this job is still worth it for those who love to work alone with no boss looking over your shoulder. But there might be occasional customer contact that you must handle. This should not discourage you from taking the job if you are keen to work as a delivery service person. 

The average salary for this job is $60,000 annually.

  1. Editor 

You will work with a deadline but not around many people. This job also requires far less communication with others. You can be an editor for online publishers like Kindle Unlimited or you can edit papers submitted for research journals. You do not need to know the subjects. All you need is excellent target language skills (English, Portuguese, Spanish, etc.) 

The average salary for this job is $52,058 annually with bonuses, profit sharing, and commission.

  1. Night security 

If you are a night owl, you can be night security. Watch over dangers and enjoy the breeze of nightlife.

The average salary for this job is $12.06 hourly with bonuses, profit sharing, and commission. 

  1. Truckers

Another job that requires almost zero communication is becoming a trucker. You can travel far and drop goods in other cities. Being a trucker, however, will require you to travel a lot and you need to be physically and emotionally ready for the long trips. The good part is you can do the trip with your dog or your best friends to make it less lonely. 

A commercial truck driver can make $19.75 per hour with bonuses, profit sharing, and commission. 

  1. Podiatrists 

This job is responsible for diagnosing and treating a disease of the foot. Working in this job requires less communication but you might need to create a report in writing form. 

The average salary for this job is $130,142 annually with bonuses, profit sharing, and commission. 

  1. Database administrator 

The nature of this work largely focuses on an in-house job. Making communication with outsiders and public speaking is unimportant to this work. Work responsibilities include administering and managing computer databases. 

The average salary for this job is $73,765 annually with bonuses, profit sharing, and commission. 

Read also: 10+ Suitable Careers for Psychology Graduates