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An interview is like a trade. You show off your skills, experiences and proficiencies, ‘sell’ it to a company, and they ‘buy’ them. When you are being offered the position, your salary negotiation skill will come into place!

Other than the need to know your worth and the median salary range in the market right now, you need to be equipped with negotiation skills! Using the wrong strategies might just lead you to the path of failure. No one wants to be underpaid and learning some great negotiation skills will do you some good!

Can’t wait to negotiate? Slow down! Be a smart candidate and here are the top 5 mistakes when negotiating a salary that you have to avoid:

Lack of research

Some candidates state their expected salary without much researching. They tend to decide the salary expectation merely based on what they need or by guessing.

Do research the valid market rate for the job position! Considering the working experience, qualifications, responsibilities and the geographic area of the industry are essential, as these points will determine the standard wage you deserve. Online salary reference is a useful resource, but keep in mind that the listed job titles might have a different scope of responsibilities.

It is also advisable to check within your network of people in the same job position. If it’s needed, do cross check with some recruiters from a professional organisation to find out how you should measure your expected salary.

Not asking for more

For some people, it might be awkward to negotiate a sensitive topic like salary. However, not negotiating at all might be worse off. Are you afraid if the employers will pull the offer? As long as you know where your capabilities are and the ability to fulfil well or even more than what the company expected. Do not ‘downgrade’ yourself so that you can get the job! Other than just considering the salary you are asking for, employers are also looking for the right talent fit!

Failing to consider non-salary items

Monetary might not give you the job satisfaction you need. Value your future employers, as they might be giving you a standard base salary but they could be offering other great benefits. A yearly bonus, regular business trips (across the cities or countries!), allowances, rewards to achievements and great retirement plan are some non-salary items worth considering! Thus, look at the overall package they are offering you.

Allow your future employers to know your last drawn salary

Some employers will ask you about the salary you are drawing in your previous job. Let them know and justify why you are currently asking for more.

Don’t take it personally

Salary negotiation is a good idea, but you might feel undervalued should the process goes the opposite direction. Do keep in mind that, business is still a business, and the employers will hire the best talents they can afford. When negotiation goes tough, and you are not able to accept the undervaluing offer, just let it go. Some companies also have their standard rules to the tier of salary package offered.

Salary negotiation is both challenging and tricky. Avoiding these 5 mistakes might help you out in future! Check out www.jobiness.com and find out what are you worth now!

Next read: Are You Well-Prepared for Your Internship? Beware of These Top 8 Common Mistakes!

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Interviews often have similar questions in some ways like ‘how do you describe yourself?’ or ‘what are the weaknesses and strengths do you have’? These questions are indeed valuable, as the answers would depict how far one views and recognizes oneself, resulting in self-control capability measurement. In another way, these questions (unfortunately) are considered to be repetitious that candidates could rehearse for the answers.

Then what should you do before entering that interview room? If you have prepared yourself with some rehearsed answers, beware as some questions could be quite tricky, especially those revealing ones. Curious enough to know the tricky ones? Check out the list below.

Questions related to a willingness to take risks

A common question like ‘Are you afraid to fail?’ seems to be easy to answer as everybody would say ‘No’ as the diplomatic answer. A tactical interviewer would replace the question with ‘What are the things you have done in our career that you are most proud of and least proud of?’ The question sounds different, but it has a similar goal, to figure out your willingness to take risks and making mistakes!

When you say proudly about your ability to transform an issue to a good lesson and not afraid to make more mistakes (not the same ones, of course), the interviewer will probably give points for that. Conversely, when you are disappointed in making mistakes and don’t want to make more mistakes, you are considered as someone who doesn’t take risks. Nobody never not make mistakes!

Questions related to willingness to learn

Instead of asking a common question like ‘Do you love to learn something new?’, a tricky question will be more revealing like ‘How do you spend your off time?’. If one has a great curiosity and willingness to learn, he/she might give answers like learning a Photoshop software or trying a new Italian recipe rather than being inactive. If you love to do both at the off times, give the more prospective answer.

Questions related to willingness to help others

Smart candidates would be nothing if she/he doesn’t want to help others, resulting in being a bad team member.  A common question like ‘Are you a helpful and enjoy teamwork?’ would be better replaced with ‘If you were to describe yourself as one of these elements -earth, fire, water, and air- which one it would be?’

The main focus is not about what element you choose, as there are no right or wrong answers. It would be more impressive when you can explain why you chose the element and the relationship of how it benefits the others.

Questions related to revealing inner drive

Interviewers are often curious about how someone would see themselves at work. Whether she/he would be the passive worker, doing tasks based on the top’ orders or as an active worker, doing a task passionately and experimenting to gain more optimal outcomes than the company’s had expected.

A question like: ‘How do you balance your life and work?’ would be revealing if someone is trying to control a lot of portion of their lives or if they have a good attitude towards work and personal life.

Those are some samples of revealing questions but your interviewer’s questions might vary in some different ways. The most important thing is that your answer should depict your own point of view, and not somebody else’s to gain a great impression. It is worth to remember that every interviewer’s question essentially wants to figure out your perspective and attitude towards the job position itself. Give the best answers you have and be confident.

Next read : 15 Minutes Before Interview : Absolutely Important For Job seekers!

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Fifteen minutes before a job interview could be the longest fifteen minutes ever in someone’s life. Job seekers frequently prepare the needed documents at home and generally, you will be there early for the interview. (You won’t want to be late!)

So, you have arrived 15 minutes before the interview appointment and wondering what you should do? That 15 minutes would be the most crucial for you and make it to your advantage!

Don’t be too nervous, stay calm!

Keep calm while waiting for your turn is one thing to remember if you do not want your body to release stress hormones. Stress hormones could affect your ability to think clearly, and that will be bad, isn’t it? When you already in the interview room, maintain the calmness and focus on the interviewer. Not only can this help you give the best answers as you have prepared, but it also helps to project confidence too.

Always arrive early, but don’t go straight in yet!

Lateness frequently gives a negative impression of the interviewee. Always go early but on time! Yes, you have reached 15 minutes earlier, but you can wait for about 10 minutes before entering the company. Too long a wait could increase your anxiety and nervousness. Use the 10 minutes to calm yourself and revise what you need in your mind.

Be friendly to everybody that you meet in the office!

Friendly greetings are always a good start! This action increases the comfort feeling, your confidence and significantly leaves a good impression too. Some of the people you have greeted in the office might just play a part in your interview process!

Too much rehearsing

Rehearsing over and over again would make your answers seem to be scripted, so keep in mind that the interview is a conversation and believe in yourself that you could answer those questions smoothly. Let it flow!

Don’t check your email, social media accounts, and voice mail

Turn those off and put your mobile phone away! Young job seekers often do the same thing before doing something important in their lives: posting a status on social media accounts. Yes, you can do that but not within just minutes away from the interview! Set your smartphones to silent so that it don’t disrupt your interview session.

Last but not least, Check out www.jobiness.com and land yourself a great career! Remember these five top tips to perform your best in front of the interviewers!

See also : How to Answer These 4 Most Common Interview Questions

How to Answer These 4 Most Common Interview Questions

For people who have been through plenty of job interviews, we realise that common interview questions do exist. Let’s take a look at these most common interview questions and how to answer them.

1. Why do you want to fill this position?

People at the company you’re applying for would love to hear about what makes you want to apply for that position. Of course, they expect to hear an exceptional answer from you. In order to do that, you need to identify a few key factors that make the role a great fit for you.

Sometimes, the answer might not be enough, because it’s all about you. Honestly, this question also forces you to share the reason on why you love the company. Your admiration to the company could be the reason you’re considered as a stand-out candidate.

2. Can you tell me about yourself?

You’ve heard this question all the time, but there’s a chance you still fail to answer it at its best. The hiring managers don’t want to hear it all, like your personal history. You need to make it concise when you’re answering this question.

Just choose 2-3 relevant experiences that might interest the interviewer to know about. Make sure you can convince them that those accomplishments are the right capital for the position you’re applying for.

3. What is your expected salary?

There’s no exact way on how to answer this question. The right answer depends on your education, skills, and experience. If you’re clueless, then do some research on what you should be paid. Apart from that, be a flexible candidate. Tell the interviewer that you respect your skills, but you are still willing to negotiate. It shows that you really want the job.

4. Any questions for me?

Do you often say “no” for this question? If yes, you’re throwing a chance on becoming a noticeable candidate. Be curious enough about the company and its culture. That way, the interview can draw a conclusion that you’re one passionate candidate.

Ask the interviewer about how much they love working at the company, or the company’s future plan. They will be happy that you care about them.

 

Those are the most common interview questions with tips on how to answer them. Let’s land the job on your next interview!

Bessie is a freelance writer and has 10 years of HR experience. She is currently a Regional HR Business Partner with a US MNC. 
One of the common questions that you can expect during a job interview is the salary question. Employers will usually ask about your current salary and expected salary for the role to assess your suitability. Some of you may find it rather uncomfortable to disclose your expected salary since you are unsure of the chances of securing the role. On the other hand, some of you are perfectly comfortable declaring that you are expecting a minimum of 20% increase from your base salary.
What is the right way to give to an employer so as to ensure that you are not giving the impression that salary is the main factor for applying the job? Under such a situation, below are some suggestions on how you can handle this tough question.

[more…]

Do your research

Before you attend the interview, it will be useful to research on the average market pay of the applied position. Several big recruitment agencies publish such salary information on an annual basis and are available to public on their website. Jobiness.sg is also a good resource whereby you can review the available salary data submitted by employees in various companies. Such information will provide you with an estimated range that you can expect for similar position. However, do bear in mind that salary ranges in companies and industries differ significantly. Hence, you should only use these information as a guide in preparation for the interview.

View Salary Data of 1000s of Jobs in Singapore

Negotiable

The term “negotiable” is usually the easiest solution when handling a salary question. Most interviewers tend to probe further in order to understand your expectation. If you are really unsure of how you are expecting, decide on a range that you are looking at. For instance, you could tell the interviewer that you are looking at a 10% to 15% increase, but you are willing to negotiate based on the salary range for this position.



READ ALSO: How Companies Determine Salaries for New Employees



Declare your minimum expectation

If you have in mind the least amount that you can accept for the role, do inform the interviewer of that minimum expectation. This is especially applicable for candidates who are considering a career switch. With no relevant experience in the new role and industry, you may not receive the same or higher salary as your current role. While considering the satisfaction that you can expect in the new role, it is also realistic to consider the lowest amount that could support your current lifestyle. As an Engineer, you may be earning a basic salary of $4000 while career switch may mean a reduction at least $1000. Do consider if the reduction is an amount that you are able to accept. You should be open to the interviewer and tell him or her that you are willing to accept a pay cut but $3,500 may be the minimum that you will consider.

You are strongly discouraged to tell the interviewer that you are willing to negotiate when you are not. The interviewer will be able to determine if they should continue with your candidacy if your expectation exceeds the salary range. In that way, it will save time and effort for both the company and yourself.

State your actual expectation
You may be one of those candidates who decide on a job solely based on the offered salary. There is nothing wrong with that but it is advisable to discuss that openly during the interview. If the interviewer is aware that you will not consider a role unless there is a 20% increase, it will help them to decide if they will like to continue with your candidacy based on your relevant experiences, job fit and internal salary structure and equity. Interviewers have met many candidates who tell them that they are willing to negotiate on the offered salary. However, when the job offer is presented, candidates turn it down immediately with the reason that the offered salary is less than the amount that they are expecting. That could set a very negative impression of you as a candidate. If you are attending interviews in the same industry, don’t be surprised when word gets around as the people within do know each other.

READ ALSO: Questions to Ask at the End of the Job Interview 

On a closing note, regardless of whether your interview is from the Human Resource or the hiring manager himself/herself, the same method applies when answering the salary question. Another mistake that candidates make when handling salary questions is asking too many questions in return. Examples of these questions include – “how much will you pay me for this role”; “what is the salary range for this position”; “what other monetary allowances can I expect”. These questions are internally sensitive and should be avoided until the advanced stage of the interview process when you are confident that you will be offered the job. Otherwise, these questions may bring down your overall interview scores.



What was your interview experience like? Share with us here.

 

Photo Credit: Wetfeet

Always keep in mind that your main objective during a job interview is to impress the employer and ‘sell’ your skills and competencies to the company. While you already probably know most of the basic tips and tricks to ace your job interview like coming on time, preparing answers to possible questions, dressing appropriately, and all of that, there may be another simple trick that just might get you ahead of other applicants – to ask good questions at the end of your interview. [more…]

 

Most employers will always end an interview with “Do you have any questions?” Now, this is your chance both to learn about the company and impress the interviewer further by showing more interest about the company’s ideals, work culture, and staff. Asking good, sincere questions will show that you are looking forward to joining their team and are serious about your application. Remember, interviewers have the eye for spotting serious applicants from those who are just trying to look around for possible income opportunities. And obviously, they would opt for someone who shows sheer interest and inquisitiveness.

 

Now, don’t just go asking silly questions just so you could ask something. You may have already impressed them during the interview but totally blow it at the end by asking questions that are uncalled for. Below are some quick, intelligent and sincere questions you can always pull out at the end of an interview, as soon as you hear he interviewer ask, “Do you have any questions?”

 

  • “What are the essential traits/skills you are looking for in the person to successful fill this position?” And then follow it up with, “How do you think I measure up to these criteria?” It is always good to hear straight from the interviewer what they are looking for to fill the position. And by asking if you fit their expectations, it would give you the chance to find out what they think you are lacking. You will then have a great opportunity to highlight on some other related strength that you know will definitely interest them.

 

  • “Could you tell me more about the work culture here?” By asking this you are implying that you are very open to working with a diverse work culture and are willing to learn their work culture and blend with the team. This also shows that you really imagine yourself working with them in the near future.

 

  • “How do you measure performance?” This automatically shows that you are very results-driven, you keep to deadlines, and value time and commitment.

 

  • “What would be this company’s biggest challenge right now?” This could open up a great conversation about the bigger picture of what the company does and how you could really be a part of the solution. This is where you can share more of your experiences and knowledge in the industry.

 

  • “Should I call back to follow up or will you just contact me for updates?” End the entire interview by showing your eagerness to land the job and that you are really hoping to get a response from them.

———————–

Click here to learn what kind of interview questions interviews will ask.

Went for an interview recently? Share with us your interview experience! 

You might like: “How to Turn the Tide During an Interview (When Things Go Bad)”

Do you love writing? Email us (contact@jobiness.com) your resume and writing samples if you want to contribute to our blogs!

Always keep in mind that your main objective during a job interview is to impress the employer and ‘sell’ your skills and competencies to the company. While you already probably know most of the basic tips and tricks to ace your job interview like coming on time, preparing answers to possible questions, dressing appropriately, and all of that, there may be another simple trick that just might get you ahead of other applicants – to ask good questions at the end of your interview. [more…]

 

Most employers will always end an interview with “Do you have any questions?” Now, this is your chance both to learn about the company and impress the interviewer further by showing more interest about the company’s ideals, work culture, and staff. Asking good, sincere questions will show that you are looking forward to joining their team and are serious about your application. Remember, interviewers have the eye for spotting serious applicants from those who are just trying to look around for possible income opportunities. And obviously, they would opt for someone who shows sheer interest and inquisitiveness.

 

Now, don’t just go asking silly questions just so you could ask something. You may have already impressed them during the interview but totally blow it at the end by asking questions that are uncalled for. Below are some quick, intelligent and sincere questions you can always pull out at the end of an interview, as soon as you hear he interviewer ask, “Do you have any questions?”

 

  • “What are the essential traits/skills you are looking for in the person to successful fill this position?” And then follow it up with, “How do you think I measure up to these criteria?” It is always good to hear straight from the interviewer what they are looking for to fill the position. And by asking if you fit their expectations, it would give you the chance to find out what they think you are lacking. You will then have a great opportunity to highlight on some other related strength that you know will definitely interest them.

 

  • “Could you tell me more about the work culture here?” By asking this you are implying that you are very open to working with a diverse work culture and are willing to learn their work culture and blend with the team. This also shows that you really imagine yourself working with them in the near future.

 

  • “How do you measure performance?” This automatically shows that you are very results-driven, you keep to deadlines, and value time and commitment.

 

  • “What would be this company’s biggest challenge right now?” This could open up a great conversation about the bigger picture of what the company does and how you could really be a part of the solution. This is where you can share more of your experiences and knowledge in the industry.

 

  • “Should I call back to follow up or will you just contact me for updates?” End the interview by showing your eagerness to land the job and that you are really hoping to get a response from them.

 

———————–

Click here to learn what kind of interview questions interviews will ask.

Went for an interview recently? Share with us your interview experience! 

You might like: “How to Turn the Tide During an Interview (When Things Go Bad)”

Do you love writing? Email us (contact@jobiness.com) your resume and writing samples if you want to contribute to our blogs!

 

Always keep in mind that your main objective during a job interview is to impress the employer and ‘sell’ your skills and competencies to the company. While you already probably know most of the basic tips and tricks to ace your job interview like coming on time, preparing answers to possible questions, dressing appropriately, and all of that, there may be another simple trick that just might get you ahead of other applicants – to ask good questions at the end of your interview. [more…]

 

Most employers will always end an interview with “Do you have any questions?” Now, this is your chance both to learn about the company and impress the interviewer further by showing more interest about the company’s ideals, work culture, and staff. Asking good, sincere questions will show that you are looking forward to joining their team and are serious about your application. Remember, interviewers have the eye for spotting serious applicants from those who are just trying to look around for possible income opportunities. And obviously, they would opt for someone who shows sheer interest and inquisitiveness.

 

Now, don’t just go asking silly questions just so you could ask something. You may have already impressed them during the interview but totally blow it at the end by asking questions that are uncalled for. Below are some quick, intelligent and sincere questions you can always pull out at the end of an interview, as soon as you hear he interviewer ask, “Do you have any questions?”

 

  • “What are the essential traits/skills you are looking for in the person to successful fill this position?” And then follow it up with, “How do you think I measure up to these criteria?” It is always good to hear straight from the interviewer what they are looking for to fill the position. And by asking if you fit their expectations, it would give you the chance to find out what they think you are lacking. You will then have a great opportunity to highlight on some other related strength that you know will definitely interest them.

 

  • “Could you tell me more about the work culture here?” By asking this you are implying that you are very open to working with a diverse work culture and are willing to learn their work culture and blend with the team. This also shows that you really imagine yourself working with them in the near future.

 

  • “How do you measure performance?” This automatically shows that you are very results-driven, you keep to deadlines, and value time and commitment.

 

  • “What would be this company’s biggest challenge right now?” This could open up a great conversation about the bigger picture of what the company does and how you could really be a part of the solution. This is where you can share more of your experiences and knowledge in the industry.

 

  • “Should I call back to follow up or will you just contact me for updates?” End the interview by showing your eagerness to land the job and that you are really hoping to get a response from them.

 

Always keep in mind that your main objective during a job interview is to impress the employer and ‘sell’ your skills and competencies to the company. While you already probably know most of the basic tips and tricks to ace your job interview like coming on time, preparing answers to possible questions, dressing appropriately, and all of that, there may be another simple trick that just might get you ahead of other applicants – to ask good questions at the end of your interview. [more…]

 

Most employers will always end an interview with “Do you have any questions?” Now, this is your chance both to learn about the company and impress the interviewer further by showing more interest about the company’s ideals, work culture, and staff. Asking good, sincere questions will show that you are looking forward to joining their team and are serious about your application. Remember, interviewers have the eye for spotting serious applicants from those who are just trying to look around for possible income opportunities. And obviously, they would opt for someone who shows sheer interest and inquisitiveness.

 

Now, don’t just go asking silly questions just so you could ask something. You may have already impressed them during the interview but totally blow it at the end by asking questions that are uncalled for. Below are some quick, intelligent and sincere questions you can always pull out at the end of an interview, as soon as you hear he interviewer ask, “Do you have any questions?”

 

  • “What are the essential traits/skills you are looking for in the person to successful fill this position?” And then follow it up with, “How do you think I measure up to these criteria?” It is always good to hear straight from the interviewer what they are looking for to fill the position. And by asking if you fit their expectations, it would give you the chance to find out what they think you are lacking. You will then have a great opportunity to highlight on some other related strength that you know will definitely interest them.

 

  • “Could you tell me more about the work culture here?” By asking this you are implying that you are very open to working with a diverse work culture and are willing to learn their work culture and blend with the team. This also shows that you really imagine yourself working with them in the near future.

 

  • “How do you measure performance?” This automatically shows that you are very results-driven, you keep to deadlines, and value time and commitment.

 

  • “What would be this company’s biggest challenge right now?” This could open up a great conversation about the bigger picture of what the company does and how you could really be a part of the solution. This is where you can share more of your experiences and knowledge in the industry.

 

  • “Should I call back to follow up or will you just contact me for updates?” End the entire interview by showing your eagerness to land the job and that you are really hoping to get a response from them.

———————–

Click here to learn what kind of interview questions interviews will ask.

Went for an interview recently? Share with us your interview experience! 

You might like: “How to Turn the Tide During an Interview (When Things Go Bad)”

You’re sitting back in your chair, feeling utterly and completely defeated. Your interviewer sits across from you, his arms akimbo and giving you a gaze that clearly communicates that he is not impressed with your performance so far. The last ten minutes that have passed since the start of the interview felt like an hour long instead. Murphy’s Law has seemed to be the most applicable law of the day thus far.

Have you ever found yourself in such a situation during your job interview? [more…]It is entirely understandable that you would begin to get nervous or agitated, especially in this time of dwindling job vacancies and career opportunities. Fret not – here are a few interview tips that will help you to recover quickly and get the attention of your interviewer back:

 

“Keep Calm, Take a Deep Breath and Re-engage”

 

At a certain point in the job interview, maybe the interviewer lost you and began to zone out in the midst of your rambling. Some tell-tale signs include:

 

Fiddling with his/her iPhone or Blackberry;

Examining his/her fingernails or the surroundings;

Giving you a disapproving and uninterested stare;

Nodding vaguely but not giving you eye contact;

Not responding in appropriate fashion to your stories, or

Simply staring into space and not responding

 

This is certainly bad news – it means that he or she has ascertained that whatever you have delivered so far, in response to the interview questions, are not a good fit to what he or she is looking for. Stop yourself and take a breather. Smile, and re-engage your interviewer again, so you can get back on track.

 

Ask relevant questions: One good way to re-engage your interviewer is to ask him a relevant question about himself/herself or the company. Ask your interviewer how the company culture is like, or how it feels like to work there. By doing so, you will re-emphasize your interest in the company, and also prompt your interviewer to give you more information to use in demonstrating your suitability for the company.

 

Change the topic: Another way to re-engage your interviewer would be to stop what you’re currently talking about, change to another subject, and keep your new story short. If it is evident that what you are currently talking about is boring your interviewer, switching to something else might work in capturing your interviewer back. Bear in mind not to get lost in another long narrative, though – try to be as concise as possible, and ask for your interviewer’s input as much as you can.

 

Take a short break to recover: The worst thing you could possibly do, of course, is to completely freak out and start rambling and going off on wild tangents. If you’re getting a huge case of the jitters, you might even want to request for a brief toilet break – politely. This might or might not work, depending on the interviewer’s patience. If it does, head straight to the toilet and splash your face with cold water. Take long, slow breaths, and gather your thoughts again. Run through what you want to tell the interviewer in your head, and make sure you return looking and feeling more confident. It is far better to take a break and re-group than to push forward in a losing battle.

 

Demonstrate your interest in the job strongly – even if you are under or over qualified: If you chose to interview for a job that you are either under or over qualified for, you must have a very good reason for taking that chance. Make sure you prove it to your interviewer. Demonstrate your interest in the job strongly by displaying your knowledge in the related areas, or by matching the skills that you know you have to the skills that are required of the job for the benefit of the interviewer. Do not expect the interviewer to connect the dots for you – show that you mean business by taking the initiative.

 

In sum, never throw in the towel, even when all seems lost. By taking the above steps, you will be able to take the reins and steer the interview back to a more positive direction that would definitely increase your chances of getting hired.