Job vs. Career: Life-long Adventure after Graduation 

Congratulations on your graduation! So you have finished college, earned a degree, and now it is time to practice what you have learnt at school in the world of working. Whether you are dabbling with ideas or searching furiously for that first big gig, there are small steps you can take to ensure your first job works in lock-step with your long-term career goals.

What is a job and what is a career? 

A job and a career are usually used in the same context but serve different functions. Both are focused on how an individual earns money, but there are some differences you might never realise. 

See also: How to Answer Behavioural Questions

A job – is short-term oriented and tends to focus on earning money. 

Jobs have a small impact on future resumes because they aren’t typically related to what an individual career is or will be. Jobs also offer less networking opportunities because coworkers often won’t be continuing on the same field in the future career. In addition, most jobs consist of hourly wages, are more short-term, and focus on getting a task done. 

A career – is a series of related employment in one field that provides experience for your future and helps you earn better paychecks and living status. 

Career is all about building up skills through various employment opportunities, strengthening ability to move on to higher paying or more prestigious jobs. Careers provide a foundation of experiences that help fuel professional life for many years. In addition, careers are more long-term focused on learning, gaining experiences, building connections, and putting yourself in the right position for promotions and raises.

Creating professional life with purpose 

As a graduate, you might now look for an opportunity that can both help you earn money and earn dignity through skill advancement. If this is exactly what you are pursuing, ensuring that your job and career goals are aligned is important. Here are three tricks you can use. 

  • Overcome pressure – At times, you might feel immense pressure. It is natural, but don’t let it stop you. Work hard, learn and develop a lasting relationship and soon enough the pressure will pass. 
  • Be proactive - Employees, especially millennials, often get bored easily but do nothing about it. If you are among these people, make sure to turn your boredom into opportunity by getting proactive. Get creative and seek solutions. Young professionals who solve problems move up faster. 
  • Set simple goals – Workplace can be wonderful, yet confusing at the same time due to tight deadlines, ungrateful bosses, etc. Shadow talented co-workers. Gain control by getting simple goals. Make a list of skills you want to learn and get senior professionals around you to weigh in. Keep a checklist and hold yourself accountable. 

Read also: What to Do When You Hear Nothing from a Job Application? 

How to Answer Behavioural Questions

Employers want to know that the candidates they hire will fit in both company culture and the position applied. In the job interview, hiring managers need to ensure that candidates have the qualities they are seeking for, therefore they often ask behavioural questions to uncover it.

Behavioural interview questions are questions that focus on how a job candidate has handled different work situations in the past to reveal their personality, abilities, and skills. Interviewees could use their work experience, volunteer positions, or sports experiences to answer behavioural questions. 

See also: 6 Phrases to AVOID When Applying for Job and Interview

Simplify with the S.T.A.R Approach

STAR is an acronym that stands for Situation, Task, Action, and Results. This interview technique offers a straightforward format which job seekers can use to answer behavioural interview questions. This technique requires interviewees to provide a real-life example of how they handle a certain kind of situation at work in the past. 

Behavioural questions usually are easy to recognise as they often have telltale openings like: 

  • Have you ever encountered a situation that makes you grumpy? How do you handle the situation? 
  • Describe your most daunting challenge and how you handle the situation?
  • Talk about a mistake you made. What happened and how did you handle it? 
  • Please describe a scenario in which you were under pressure. What was going on and how did you respond? 
  • Tell me about your proudest accomplishment. 

In some cases, recruiters can provide a situation in which interviewees have to answer with a real-life example based on their past experiences. 

Preparation checklist 

When answering a behavioural question, interviewees should be able to identify the most interesting event, hence could grab the attention of the interviewer. However, if interviewees do not have any work event related to the question, they can pick the most relevant ones from personal experiences. When doing so, make sure to tell a recruiter that the event happened not in the workplace but instead it is based on the personal experience. 

Here are tips to pick the best event and how you can relate it to the question: 

  • Categorise your experiences into successes, challenges, leadership moments, teamwork skills, and problem-solving situations. 
  • Practice your answer out loud before the interview session and plot the answer neatly. 
  • Get comfortable with your strengths and weaknesses because interviewers might ask more questions regarding your strengths and weaknesses. 
  • Always be honest. 

“It is all about lessons learned. Your answer to behavioural questions should demonstrate how you tackled and solved a problem. And of course, what you learned from this situation.” - Jodi Glickman 

Read also: 3 Reasons Why Showcasing Your Personality during Job Interview is Essential

3 Reasons Why Showcasing Your Personality during Job Interview is Essential

Being a suitable job candidate for a specific position in a company requires more than a well-written CV. While having confidence could be one of the biggest advantages to being a candidate of choice, it might not be enough to secure a job offer. Job seekers must go beyond just well-written resumes by showcasing their personality.

See also: 4 Tips to Find a Job that Fits and Suits You

According to Heckman et al., personality has been a scientifically-proven predictor of job performance and assessing a candidate’s behavioural tendencies in a work environment. This allows recruiters to determine whether a candidate will be a top performer and if he/she will fit the culture of the company. Recruiter Experts cited there are three more advantages for job seekers when showcasing their personality during an interview: 

1- Your personality is a success indicator 

Personality is the driving force behind how one thinks, feels, acts, adapts and works. The stories you share in a job interview regarding past experiences can be an indicator of how you will deal with adversity and opportunity. Potential employers want a glimpse into your future successes and failures. Often, the simplest indicator is your personality. 

2- Skills can be taught, personality cannot 

More and more companies are realising that skills and knowledge can be gained on the job. However, personality is hardwired. If you come to the table with a personality that matches with a company’s culture, other technical skills can be learned over time. 

3- Culture is king 

Your personality can indicate that you will build good culture in a company which will create a healthy place to work, not only for yourself but also for others. 

Using insights from personality assessments and your past experiences to really understand what an ideal environment looks like will lead you to the right career path. Remember, it needs to be a fit on both sides. There is no use in denying your personality. 

Read also: 10 Suitable Jobs for YOU Who are Bad Communicators

Dos & Don'ts when Asking Questions to Recruiter

If you, as a candidate, are enthusiastic during an interview, the chance of getting hired is higher. An interview session is a place where you can figure out whether the job and workplace culture is a fit for you. Therefore, don’t hesitate to ask the questions you prepare beforehand to the interviewer.

See also: 6 Phrases to AVOID When Applying for Job and Interview

Here are the dos and don’ts that will help you get the most out of every question you ask: 

DO

  • Ask your most pressing questions first. These could be about the culture, goals of your future team or how performance will be evaluated.
  • Ask probing questions. Consider asking which personality traits are most common among the most successful employees, or what employees enjoy most about working there. 
  • Ask interviewers about their own career paths. For example, ask them how they decided to go into their field, or what steps they took within the company to attain their current position.
  • Ask about challenges. What will make this job difficult? What will you need to overcome?
  • Ask for their contact information and whether you can connect with them for further information.

DON’T

  • Don’t ask questions to sound smart. For example, interrupting the recruiter before he/she finishes their questions, just because you know the better option or better solution to the question asked. 
  • Don’t ask about something you could find online. This might make the recruiter think that you haven’t done your homework well. Remember that searching and researching information about the company before an interview is vital to your interview success. 
  • Don’t be unprofessional. You should limit yourself when asking questions even when the recruiter says that you can ask anything, NEVER ask about personal life, such as marital status, his/her personal salary, etc. 
  • Don’t push. If the hiring manager won’t answer your question, it’s best to leave it alone.

Read also: How to Discuss a Gap Year in an Interview

5 Types of People to Include in Your LIFE Circle

Networking has always been the top ingredient of success. In many cases, having a network will help in your job search, expand your knowledge, and improve your expertise. Yet, networking is not all about growing your list of contacts. You cannot just pick random individuals, ask their email or phone number and add them to your contact list, then contact them when you need help. More than that, networking is all about knowing someone at a deeper level that could help improve yourself as an individual.

With that in mind, it is essential to be selective when making new connections. Why? Because getting in a wrong networking circle could hamper your life. Meanwhile, getting yourself surrounded by the right individuals can give you a boost as you will get advice and feedback from a hand-picked group of strategic advisors who truly tip the scales in your favour. 

See also: 4 Tips to Find a Job that Fits and Suits You

So, who should be in your circle? Here are five types of people to include. 

The advocate 

The advocate individuals know you on a personal level, acts as a trusted sounding board, and likely a close friend or family member. When you ask a question such as “how can my first few jobs line up with my personal values?” to your advocate circle, they can help you by giving true answers because they know your ins and outs. 

The strategic “In” 

The strategic “In” is more like a connection of the outside. They are well-connected individuals, demonstrate a willingness to make connections on your behalf, and likely alumni, past internship advisors, or your professors. When you ask your strategic “In” circle about a new job in X company, they will happily connect you with the current employees of C-suites. 

The subject matter expert 

As the name suggests, subject matter expert networks are those who can offer you superior insight on a specific industry, give you an unbiased opinion, likely an alumni contact, professors, or family members. This circle can widen your skills and knowledge about the outside worlds, especially the professional ones. In addition, they can give you advice on how to develop yourself and always push you to grow. Usually, these people are those who will make you uncomfortable in your comfort zone. 

The financial guru 

We know that money is one of the most powerful weapons in today’s industry and being financially illiterate can usher you to more difficulties, such as debt, loan, credit, etc. That is one of the reasons why many employees demand financial programs within their organisations. In this case, you should find one network who can be a financial guru. This network is usually those who live to observe stocks and might work around numbers daily. They can be anyone, like your family member, advocates, friends, or project buddy. 

The social butterfly 

Last but not least, the social butterfly individual is someone who can encourage you to connect with others. They are very person-centred and love being the centre of attention. Having one or two social butterflies around will help you get out of your comfort zone and can teach you how to network better. This is especially good for a very introverted or shy individual. 

Read also: 10 Suitable Jobs for YOU Who are Bad Communicators 

Pros and Cons of Working in the Journalism Industry 

Every profession has its own pros and cons, including those working in the journalism industry. As one of the oldest professions in the world, journalism has changed monumentally owing to a staggering growth of technology. This means that the skeletal structure of this career remains the same, yet the responsibility and the view might differ. Compelling storytelling and fact-based are still its strongest pillar, however.

See also: Job Search Tips in Time of Crisis 

So, if you are interested in joining this industry, you better aid yourself with this information of working as a journalist. 

Pros of being a journalist 

  • In journalism, you are working with ever-changing expectations. For example, you can work in a very confidential matter but the next day, you might be asked to cover funny nerve-wracking news. 
  • You will always have a new challenge and demand, thus this job is great for you who can work under pressure. 
  • You get to meet and talk to a variety of people from all walks of life. You might also have a chance to cover and interview highly influential people like a minister. 
  • Your name will be published in print and on websites. This is a great way for you who seek professional identity. 
  • Lastly, you have a better chance to be invited to cover various events, such as theatre performance or restaurant meal reviews for FREE. 

Cons of being a journalist 

  • Whilst the job is challenging, this role is among the lowest salary rate. Unless you reach the highest and most popular level of a journalist, do not expect a fat paycheck. Reported by payscale, an average annual salary of a journalist is $40,839 with an hourly rate of $14.81. However, if you have editing skills, you can expect a slightly higher salary. Yet, even with years of experience (5-9 years) in journalism, the average annual salary is $44,384. 
  • Being a journalist is also a long and often unsociable journey which might demand you to work on weekends and public holidays. 
  • As a journalist, you have a greater risk of death or injury for covering a riot, war zone or other violent disturbance. 
  • Lastly, the peril of being a journalist is you might be blamed for bad news or being seen as the enemy by members of the public when covering sensitive news or events.

Read also: 10 Suitable Jobs for YOU Who are Bad Communicators

10+ Suitable Careers for Psychology Graduates 

Opportunities for graduates with degrees in psychology are expanding in number as well as in scope. The move towards preventing mental illness rather than diagnosing and treating it requires people to learn how to make healthy behaviour as part of living. In fact, many of the problems we are facing today are problems of behaviour, such as chronic health conditions or diseases, drug addiction, poor personal relationships, and violence. As a psychologist, you will contribute solutions to these problems through careful collection of data, analysis of data, and the development of intervention strategies. 

Subfields in psychology 

Many psychology graduates can teach psychology in academic institutions, from high schools to graduate programs in universities. Other subfields that graduates can pursue include the following: 

  • A clinical psychologist who assesses and treats mental, emotional, and behavioural disorders.
  • A cognitive and perceptual psychologist who studies human perception, thinking and memory. 
  • A community psychologist who works to strengthen the abilities of communities, settings, an organisation, and broader social systems to meet people’s needs. 
  • A counselling psychologist who helps people recognise their strengths and resources to cope with everyday problems and serious adversity. 
  • A developmental psychologist who studies the psychological development of human beings that takes place throughout life.  
  • An educational psychologist who concentrates on how effective teaching and learning take place. 
  • An engineering psychologist who conducts research on how people work best with machines. For example, how can a computer be designed to prevent fatigue and eye strain in people? 
  • An environmental psychologist who studies the dynamics of person-environment interactions. This job requires you to examine behaviour evolving at various scales and from various processes. 
  • An evolutionary psychologist who studies how evolutionary principles such as mutation, adaptation, and selective fitness influence human thought, feeling, and behaviour. 
  • An experimental psychologist who studies a wide range of psychological phenomena, including cognitive processes, comparative psychology, and learning and conditioning. 

Other subfields that are also interesting to pursue in a psychology degree are forensic psychology, health psychology, industrial/organisational psychology, neuropsychologist, quantitative and measurement psychology, rehabilitation psychology, school and social psychology, and sport psychology. 

See also: 10+ List of Jobs for Graduates with English Degree 

Job outlook for psychology graduates 

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, opportunities in psychology will continue to grow over the next decade. The field of study is also an extraordinarily diverse field with hundreds of career paths. Some specialities, like caring for people with mental and emotional disorders, are familiar to most of us. Others, like helping with the design of advanced computer systems or studying how we remember things, are less known. 

However, psychologists often work in more than one setting. For instance, college professors often consult for industry or see clients on a part-time basis. American Psychological Association cited that psychologists often found work in one or more of these areas: 

  • university/4-year college 
  • Medical school or other academic
  • School or other educational
  • Independent practice
  • Hospital or other health services 
  • Government or VA medical centre 
  • Business and nonprofit organisations

Other potential careers with a bachelor degree in psychology include the following. 

Note that the below list is just some of the list for your consideration. A psychology degree can cover a wider range in terms of the job field. 

Job analyst Disability policy worker Fundraiser

Human resource advisor 

Employment counsellor 

host/hostess

Healthcare facility Administrator  

Personnel recruiter 

Technical writer Systems analyst Writer 

Volunteer coordinator 

Training teacher 

Victim’s advocate 

Recreational therapist 

Psychiatric technician 

Public relations representative 

Coach Community organisation worker Computer programmer

Animal trainer

Benefits manager

Admissions evaluator 

Army mental health specialist

Labour relations 


Other careers that require a degree beyond a bachelor degree in psychology are as follows: 

Academic counsellor Applied statistician Art therapist 

Optometrist 

Occupational therapist 

Psychiatrist 

Neurologist 

Sport psychologist Speech pathologist Rehabilitation psychologist 

Psychiatric social worker 

Program evaluator 

Vocational rehab couns 

Neuropathologist 

Music therapist Multicultural counsellor Experimental psychologist 

Exercise therapist 

Educational psychologist 

Neurosurgeon

Veterinarian 


Read also:
How to Land Coding Job When You Have NO Experience

4 Websites to Help You Create a Professional Resume 

Writing a resume requires an effort because, in order to catch hiring managers’ attention, you will need more than just a basic-plain-look resume. You need to blend your creativity and professionalism to create a resume that grabs not only recruiters’ eyes but also that can pass the ATS systems. This sounds a lot of effort, isn’t it? Worry no more, we have compiled 4 resume builder websites to help you create both professional and interesting resumes. You might want to combine two of the choices below to create a top-notch presence from your resume.

See also: Key Skills Needed to Survive the 21st Century

LinkedIn 

LinkedIn is not only there to widen your professional network, but also help build up a professional presence. If you already filled up your details on your LinkedIn profile, you can save the information to PDF by clicking “more box” next to “add profile section” and voila, the resume is already generated. 

This LinkedIn resume generator, however, will write down everything that you wrote in your description, giving you 2 more pages of resume. Meanwhile, the most professional resume should be written in 2 pages or less.  So, if your resume is more than the maximum length, you can scale back the content of your profile until the PDF download only generates a two-page resume or less. 

Albeit the LinkedIn resume generator could give a professional description one-click away, the design and look of the resume is quite plain. Therefore, if you want to draft a fancier resume without decreasing the professionalism, try one of these interactive resume builders.  

KickResume 

KickResume can be synchronised with your LinkedIn profile, thus, you do not need to fill out the details again. Yet, if you don’t have LinkedIn, you can still use the builder by filling out some questions regarding your work experience, education, etc. After that, you can select a template. There are two options you can choose: Free and Pro (paid template). For the free version, you can still choose a bunch of template varieties. Otherwise, you can invest in the Pro version as it will give you more ease and freedom to be more creative with your resume. 

After finishing the initial steps, you can use extensive use of “Add Phrases”. Click on the “Fill in Your CV” – scroll down – and on the profile section click “Add Phrase”. This feature will help you add descriptions so your description can pass the ATS algorithm and will match what employers are looking for. 

After finishing all the sections, proofread and proofread to make sure you do not generate some mistakes. There is a preview button you can use to take a peek on your final resume before downloading it. 

Resume.com

Resume.com is a feasible resume builder that does not require you to create an account. You can start immediately from the home page by filling your name and click next. The resume will only produce a one-page resume regardless of how many job experience you have. 

To use this service, you can begin by selecting a template. After that, you can choose “Upload Resume” or “Create New One”. If you choose “Upload Resume”, you can upload your LinkedIn resume that you have downloaded and clean up the format and content. If you choose the second option, you can input the content from scratch within the same dashboard. 

In this website builder, please pay attention to the “Editor” on the side of the edit section. Each section offers phrase suggestions that might help you if you are building content from scratch. When you have finished editing, proofread again and simply download the resume. 

Wix

Wix is one of our top editor choices. It is an online portfolio and resume builder that provides many professional and creative templates to choose from, from free to paid ones. The free plan will include Wix domain, Wix ads, and 500 MB storage. Meanwhile, the paid ones will not contain ads on your profile, thus, makes your online portfolio smoother and more professionals. Other than that, Wix is a great resume website builder that provides some of the most precise customisation options through its drag-and-drop editor. 

To start with, you need to choose your favourite template then login/sign-up with your email. If you are a new user, Wix has a short video of how to start. You can either watch or pass the view (it is a one-minute vid, we recommend you to watch it). Then, you can customise your own portfolio look. Add pictures, write a short bio, and upload your downloadable resume, portfolio, or certifications that you have created beforehand. 

Read also: How to Get Your Resume Passed by the Robots & Into Recruiter Hands

What Job Seekers Need to Know about ATS

Nearly every Fortune 500 company and a growing number of small and mid-sized businesses filter resumes through an applicant tracking system (ATS) which will be tricky for job seekers when submitting their resumes.  

What is ATS? 

Applicant tracking system is a software widely used by companies today to keep their hiring track right as it allows an employer to collect and sort thousands of resumes. 

Why do employers use ATS? 

Back in 2008, the Great Recession hit the United States, forcing companies to conduct massive layoffs. When the situation got better, people started looking for a new job that employers were flooded with job applications. The problem was, employers found that nearly 90 percent of those applying were unqualified for the job, making it difficult for employers to sort and get the best and most qualified ones. This is where the idea of ATS created. ATS was first created for employers who demanded features that could discourage and filter out unqualified candidates in no time.

See also: Maximize Your Job Search with Matrix Decision

Applicant tracking systems then gradually come into play to help recruiters do their job right. ATS would help keep all these resumes in one place, help recruiters and employers stay organised during the recruiting process. ATS also helps employers save time by automatically surfacing and highlighting top candidates. As of today, ATS becomes a necessity for both big and small firms because it could streamline, widen recruiter’s talent pools, and save time to sort massive candidates. 

Does ATS have its drawback? 

Nothing is perfect, so is ATS. Albeit an applicant tracking system could help ease the job during the recruiting process, it has one drawback. According to a Swoop Talent survey, ATS does help hire professionals to narrow their applicant pool, but top candidates often slip through the cracks. This happens because candidates do not know the right standard resume writing for ATS, thus, they applied through a system that has less-than-optionally parsing or data management. 

How does ATS work? 

Generally, different ATS providers would operate a different system. Yet, they have similarities to collect and store resumes in a database for hiring professionals to access. In addition, resumes that are in the system might be stored long in the system before it is sorted and read by real recruiters. Then, recruiters or hiring managers would search and sort through the resumes in a number of ways, depending on the system they are using. The following is the elucidation of each ATS system. 

Automatic rankings 

Some applicant tracking systems use automatic comparison from job description to resume applicant. Based on Jobscan review, one of the best ATS that uses this system is Taleo. Taleo will rank each applicant based on how well their resume scores are based on the job description. This would surely help the recruiter focus on candidates with the best job description match. 

Keyword rankings 

Keyword rankings are very common in almost all ATS systems. As an example, if a recruiter is hiring for a General Manager Assistant, the ATS will then search and sort for “ General Manager Assistant” out of hundreds of resumes in the database. Hence, this system will save candidates who have done the exact job before and anyone that does not would only be kept in the system. 

Viewing application

Last but not least, some recruiters or hiring managers would take a glance over their ATS database to get real results. This, however, is only done by a few small- and medium-sized businesses. Commonly, recruiters would take a glance over a candidate’s past highlights, job titles, and past companies. With this quick scan, recruiters could determine whether they want to learn your resume more or not. Thus, it is important to make sure your top skills and qualifications are easily identifiable, not only for the ATS but also for the recruiter’s eyes.  

Now as you are already armed and know what and how ATS works, it will be easier for you to write better resumes for ATS. If you need more guidance, read here for more tips on how to beat ATS system and get your resume into human hands

Read also: Job Fair & Online Job Search Tips for Students and Graduates 

Why & How to Get a Charity Job After Graduation

What is a charity job? 

Charity work is often confused with not-for-profit jobs due to their similarities in their job descriptions. However, these two are different from one another. In not-for-profit (NFP or non-profit), the organisations can be run by either volunteers or paid staff. The NFP also varies in size but is typically on the smaller end of organisation scale relative to other classifications such as non-government organisations. This non-profit organisation aims to not make a profit for personal gain, not hiring paid staff and/or volunteers and do not need to reach charitable status. 

Meanwhile, the charity job refers to a more specific not-for-profit organisation which has very strict guidelines as to how an organisation can qualify as a registered charity. Charity organisation’s aim is generally different from those of a job non-profit organisation. The purposes of charity work include benefiting the entire public or a sufficient section of public. Charity organisations can also hire both employees and volunteers. 

See also: 6 Phrases to AVOID When Applying for Job and Interview

Why work as a charity volunteer/employee? 

As you may know, working in a charity company does not come with a fat paycheck compared to working in private sectors. Yet, having experience of working in a charity organisation could give you two major advantages. First, it will give positive encouragement to your own wellbeing as you know that a charity job could give a huge impact to social communities. Second, a charity job is usually more flexible than having a job in a private sector or startup. The jobs also offer more flexibility in terms of working hours and job sharing opportunities which is great for you if you have an interest in other projects. 

Not only can working in a charity organisation improve your self-wellbeing, TotalJobs wrote that it also improves your resume headline, boost your network, as well as help figure out your true passions, goals and wants in life. Charity jobs are not beholden to political cycles and point-scoring, but instead has the luxury of being motivated by evidence and humanitarian values. 

Skills and requirements 

Albeit charity working seems like informal jobs, to gain or get accepted in a charity team, you still need to have certain values and skills. Mark Devlin, Chief Operating Officer for Unicef UK, told TotalJobs that working for a charity is about working for a bigger vision, own individuals goals and ambitions. That said, before getting accepted, applicants must first have ambition and at least know what they are involving themselves into. In general, employer of charity organisation would want to see the following skills in their candidates: 

  • Have great flexibility and innovation 
  • Able to multitasks 
  • Have excellent interpersonal, communication and negotiation skills 
  • Have organisation skills 
  • Can work in a team and individually
  • Have a lively and positive personality (cheerful) 
  • Ready to gain experiences and solve challenges 

Degree requirements 

There are some roles in charity jobs that you can apply, including charity fundraisers, volunteer coordinator, accounting, IT, HR, marketing, and charity officer. Some of these jobs (charity fundraiser, volunteer coordinator, and charity officer) do not need specific degrees. However, if you apply for a more specific job role, you might require a specific undergraduate qualification in the specified subject. 

If you want to improve your qualification, you can always enrol to the following subjects: 

  • Business studies
  • Community and development studies 
  • Social policy and administration studies 
  • Sociology studies 
  • Voluntary sector management courses 
  • Youth work courses 

How much will you earn? 

As mentioned earlier, working in a charity organisation would not give you much money, however, it does not mean that you will work for free. Even for an unpaid volunteer, you can get some perks too such as getting living costs or pocket money by registering in an overseas volunteer program. Larger charities in particular often offer more generous salaries to attract the best candidates. Based on TotalJobs review, the average salary can reach up to £27,500 with the range between £21,000 to £37,500 annually. There are also some charities that pay hourly. 

Read also: Why & Some Tips for Volunteering Abroad