Creative Ways to Show Your Appreciation to Colleagues 

The word appreciate is linked to being grateful or thankful for; to value or regard highly. At work, our colleagues play a vital role – being our motivator as well as a supporter to ensure our days at work run  smoothly. They are the ones we turn to whenever we need help with a project. They help us in time of need and teach us how to be grateful in a working environment. If you are an intern and your supervisor is a very welcoming and helpful person, you might want to show gratitude to appreciate their help and guidance. 

As you ponder over how to show appreciation to fellow colleagues, seniors, or boss, there are at least five practical ways as mentioned in The 5 Languages of Appreciation of the Workplace book. 

  • Words – simply thanking your colleague or writing a note is a very personal way of expressing your appreciation.
  • Gift – a gift need not always be something expensive. It is the thought that counts. By getting your colleague a gift based on their likings or preferences, it shows how much you value them as a colleague. 
  • Time – your colleagues might just wish for someone to spend time with them or to lend them a listening ear. If so, give them your time to show appreciation.
  • Acts – as a way of expressing your gratitude, you could assist your colleague in a project or work together with them to complete a task.
  • Touch – you have to be careful with this. While some might abuse it, we want to do so appropriately. A pat on the back after a work well-done is a way to appreciate your colleague through touch.

See also: Passion vs. Paycheck: Which One Should You Pursue? 

Our colleagues are the ones around us at work every day. We do not want to take them for granted. Here is some gifts idea if you decide to buy your coworkers present to show appreciations: 

  • Amplify box – a beautifully packaged snack box that helps boost mood and motivation. 
  • An eco-friendly box – a highly functional gift that might delight your coworkers and helps reduce plastic pollution. 
  • A mug – a handy little gadget that your coworkers will love. 
  • Comfortable socks – especially if you live in cold areas. 
  • Indoor plants – it helps boost the view in your coworker’s desk, and probably their productivity. 
  • A candle that smells like their favourite state – regardless of intimacy level, a therapeutic candle helps brighten one’s mood. 
  • A game of miniature golf – it can help your workmate escape from the comfort of their desk. 
  • You can also prepare tools to keep your coworker’s electronic devices neat like handy charging, desk cable clips, portable battery, a charging stand, etc. 

The idea for appreciation is endless. As long as you keep the relationship professional and show your feelings in the right manner, whatever you give, do, or say will be of your colleague’s delight. 

See also: 6 Tips to Respectfully Disagree with Your Boss

Passion vs. Paycheck Which One Should You Pursue 

When you were young, what was your ambition? It must be something simple. We as children can do anything we are interested in, no need to worry about food and school tuitions. But as we grew older, things changed. We need to buy our own food, pay our own university tuitions, pay bills, etc. Money becomes important because everything comes with a tag price. Some of us might no longer be supported financially by our family. And as we become an adult and bear more responsibilities, we might encounter more dilemmas – should we work for passion or paycheck?

It is an eternal struggle for almost everyone out there. You will always see someone who earns more, someone who loves their job more, or someone who is happier than you. And that is when you question yourself – why do you work?

Passion

It is a very noble reason to be working for passion, because it hearkens back to a more idealistic time of your life, when a career means doing something you loved. But passion does not always equate to success, materialistically or otherwise. That is because the reason for work is altruistic – you do your job because you want to. And because of that, so much of yourself is invested in your work that success is so much sweeter, but failures will sting harder and closer to the heart than if you did your job for a paycheck.

We all have to pay our dues, and when failures accumulate, it is natural to look on the other side of the fence. See all our peers who work purely for income. And realise that their salaries are so much higher than your own. There will come a time in your life when you equate your self worth to your net worth – and you will ask yourself: Is this worth it?

See also: Key Skills Needed to Survive the 21st Century

Paycheck

Working for cold, hard cash is the answer, then. It is a practical, respectable reason for work. Our parents had only one rationale for employment, to support themselves and their families. Indirectly or directly, they passed that mentality to us. Working for money is good, moral, a Confucian ethic.

However, as you work for money, you slowly realise that money has a cost. Your time. You are using the time to pay for your money. Time that could be used to pursue your interests or to spend time with loved ones. Most importantly, time could be used to develop yourself as a person.

It is nice to have this nest egg. But one day you will look at your bank account, and you will wonder if it is all worth it when other people seem to be happier doing what they are passionate about, for so much less.

Is it passion or paycheck you should care about during young adulthood?

The reasons for work are not so binary. Other people stay on in their companies because they love their colleagues and the environment. Some stay in their jobs simply because they do not know what else to do. Many stay and work because the company offers them a good work-life balance.

But all happy people have one thing in common. They know what is important to them and pursue them. You see, no two people are alike. Money might be important to some individuals, but interest might be more important to some others. Having time to spend with family might be important to one, but good colleagues might be more important to another.

So, what’s important to you?

Different people value different things in life. Sports, friends, family, religion, money, passion, power, prestige – the list goes on. It is identifying what is important to you that is the key to happiness. The question is not whether to work for passion or paycheck, but whether you are working to fulfil the goals that make you happy.

Ask yourself what is important to you. If you do not know, try. It is completely OK to make mistakes, to try every possible reason to work, and to not have all the answers. That is what life is about. But once you know what is important to you, everything will fall in place. And then you will not just be working for passion or paycheck. You will be working for your own happiness.

Read also: How to Tell: Are You in the Wrong Career, or Just Lazy? 

What Should You Do and Say in Virtual Career Fairs 

Career fairs, also known as job or recruitment fairs, are usually organised by universities in a large hall where potential employers can set up booths to attract – and probably hire – potential graduates. If you attend a career fair, you are free to ask any questions to prospective employers, take notes, and take any promotional materials employers offer. These are sources you can use to find a job and get hired in your dream company. But if you do not find your dream company in the career fairs, don’t lose heart. You can always apply to other potential employers as a stepping stone.

Since it is difficult for universities to hold a job fair in today’s pandemic situation, they are switching their physical job fairs to virtual ones. You can search these virtuals job fairs on platforms like eventbrite.com, indeed.com, jobfairsin.com, jobfairx.com, and many more. 

Is attending physical job fairs different from virtual ones? 

The only difference is that you should prepare a stable internet connection and be ready with some questions. At physical job fairs you can directly ask employers any questions and see demonstrations from them. At virtual job fairs, you can do pretty much the same. Employers will meet job seekers and discuss employment opportunities – but in order to not lose a chance, you need to prepare a stable internet connection. 

Virtual job fairs will be like attending a webinar or online discussion posts. After logging in, you can “enter” various rooms within the virtual career fair website. Each room houses different employers participating in the job fairs. When you enter a room, employers will receive a notification and greet you via a chat function. If there are others in the virtual room, you are welcomed to join the chime or opt to chat privately with an employer. Employers might even want to video chat with you face to face if they find you are a potential candidate. 

See also: 3 Tips to Get Hired by Big Tech Companies like Google, Microsoft, Facebook, etc.

So the basics are similar, but what should you prepare before the career fairs? 

Before attending a virtual career fair, you should be prepared like you are going to attend a job interview. Here is the list: 

  • Update your resume or cv. It will be better if you have a web-based portfolio so employers can check directly during one-on-one sessions. 
  • Update your LinkedIn profile. Most employers might refer to the LinkedIn platform for professional references. 
  • Register ahead of time and find information about the organisations that participate in the career fairs. Deepen your knowledge of the organisation(s) that interests you the most. 
  • Practice your pitch. How will you introduce yourself? Why are you interested in the company? What types of positions are you seeking? How is your work experience? What do you plan on asking the representatives at the virtual events? 
  • Make sure you have a stable connection and reliable tools, such as a speaker/headphones and camera. 

You’ve prepared everything and are ready to join the crowd

What Should You Do and Say in Career Fairs 

Once you log in, you should know how to stand out from the crowd. A job fair is like a competition between you and other candidates. If you are not giving it the best, you will be set aside. Here’s some advice: 

  • Wear a professional outfit – just like how you will attend a job interview in a company. Virtual presence is no difference. 
  • Attend from a distraction-free environment. A quiet location is ideal and camera capabilities mean that you want to ensure it is distraction-free for employers. This could also tell employers, “I am ready”. 
  • Be ready to put yourself out there. Introduce yourself once an employer engages you in a chat. Ask questions about the organisation and open positions. As an attendee, you must present yourself to employers and feel confident doing so. But don’t be overconfident as it might make you look arrogant. 
  • Use clear, professional business communication. Grammar matters and fluency matters. 
  • Demonstrate strong body language to present yourself as a confident and competent job seeker. 
  • Ask for the next steps and contact information at the end of a conversation. 

What kind of questions should you ask? 

As mentioned earlier, “you are free to ask any questions to a prospective employer”. However, ‘any’ does not mean all the things you have in mind. You should not ask about the employer’s personal life. Asking general questions such as “what open position do you have right now?” shows that you are unprepared. Instead, you can start off by asking these questions as proposed by some experts

  • I noticed the job description for (open role) listed (some vague items) in the responsibilities. What do you mean by that? 
  • I don’t have a traditional background in (field or function) but have worked on (something relevant). Would that be a good fit for the position? 
  • Is the (open role) you currently have listed more focused on (some functions) or (some function) 
  • What does the hiring process for (open role) look like? 
  • How long have you been at the company? 
  • What are some of the challenges you have faced in your role or at the company? 
  • What do growth and development look like at (name of the company)?
  • How does (name of the company) work to upskill and reskill its employees? 
  • What kind of person is most successful at (name of the company)? 
  • Do people hang out outside of work on a regular basis? 
  • What kind of culture is there around feedback at (name of the company)? How do people like to give and receive feedback? 
  • What is the best way to stay in touch with you? 
  • Who can I follow up with about (open role)? 

Be enthusiastic and don’t forget to say thank you. If interested, soon you should apply for the position you discussed and notify the company representative you met with at the fair that you have done so. Include a headshot with your email to the representative to increase your chance of getting hired. 

What Should You Do and Say in Career Fairs 

Read also: Student-to-Employee Transition: What Can You Learn from an Internship? 

6 Tips to Respectfully Disagree with Your Boss 

In a discussion, one often finds it easier to agree than disagree. At some point, you have a feeling that your manager’s plan will not work out well due to particular reasons. But is it okay to hold differing opinions against a supervisor? Some might say it is foolish to disagree with your boss, because such disagreement could put their job in danger.

The truth is, most bosses and managers are open to receiving different perspectives and ideas from their team members. Instead of a bunch of yes-men, managers want their staff to voice out their opinions and concerns. In the end, truly collaborative teams are those who work together to find solutions. If you disagree with the decisions your supervisor has made, then have the courage to express your thoughts. Presenting alternate solutions can provide an opportunity for your entire team to grow.

See also: 7 Things to Never Say to Your Boss 

Here are some tips to voicing disagreement positively and respectfully:

1- Clear understanding

Have a clear understanding of the issue that you disagree with. Do not speak to your boss about your disagreement until you can put it into words. You should also make sure to speak up your ideas clearly and carefully. 

2- Right place, right time

Don’t discourage ideas, especially from a supervisor, in front of other teams. It might sound unpleasant and the person you disagree with could lose face. You should talk to your boss in private so there will be no interruptions and you can accentuate your ideas better. Don’t go to him when he looks frustrated or interfere with his schedule by hitting him up just before a major meeting. Find the perfect time, like a lunch break or watercooler chat. 

3- Keep emotions out of the equation

Learn to control your emotions when there is something that you violently object to, even if your boss is obstinate. Keep in mind that you are addressing the issue and not your boss.

4- Start on a positive note 

You should not bluntly tell your boss that his idea sucks or that you disagree with them. First, you should discuss what is working well before you move on to your recommendations on how to improve the situation. Try to stay positive and respectful and lead off with a negative comment, then point out the reasons why it will not work. 

5- Provide solutions

Disagree, if you must. But you have got to provide alternative solutions. If you have nothing better to offer, you have to go along with what you have now. Don’t be discouraged when your ideas are not accepted. At the end of the day, it is your boss that makes the decision.

6- Know when to move on 

As mentioned, it is your boss who has the final decision. Once you present your argument, understand that your supervisor will ultimately decide whether to implement the approach or not. Do not force him to accept your ideas, but give him some time to think about it. Repeatedly reminding the same issue will only add tension to your relationship with the manager and team. Let go of your ego and move on once your boss makes a decision. 

Read also: 3 Tips to Get Hired by Big Tech Companies like Google, Microsoft, Facebook, etc. 

3 Tips to Get Hired by Big Tech Companies like Google, Microsoft, Facebook, etc. 

Want to work at Google? You’re not alone. There are hundreds, if not thousands, of graduates and students who dream of working at the world’s biggest tech companies like Facebook, Google, or Microsoft. Besides its appealing culture, it is common knowledge that the perks and compensations these prestigious companies offer are incontestable.

A dream of many, some people believe that applying for a job in these giant tech companies requires a high degree and IQ due to its competitive environment. Maybe you are one among those who think that it is tough for an undergraduate to mingle within these reputable communities. Shoo away this perception – only those who truly believe and work for it will actually get it. There are chances for you as an undergraduate to work with one of these big tech companies. Here are the tricks: 

1. Ask yourself why you want to get a job these tech companies 

Is it for the prestige or power of association? Is it to find approval from your family and friends? How badly do you want the role? These questions will help you know the true reasons behind your desire. 

For example, if you want to work in a giant company just to seek family or friends approval, the likeliness of achieving great results is low. If you cannot align their overall goals and vision with yours, you will not stay there for long. But if you think that your vision can help theirs, start making a plan and apply. 

See also: 10 Things To Learn During Your Internship

2. Be persistent 

A resume that is perfectly tailored to the job you are applying for is important. And, being persistent is equally crucial because you might not succeed on your first try because you will be competing with a hundred more people. So be persistent. Re-apply in the next six months if you do not get them to notice you right now. You can even apply when you are currently employed elsewhere. Companies are more attracted to candidates that are currently working. 

3. If you graduated from one of these degrees, you would get a greater chance 

Not all employers think that degree is essential. But for some roles, some employers would prefer their candidates to graduate from certain degrees. Exploring the Google Career site reveals thousands of job openings for tech-related positions. You can also research other career sites to a company of your choice. After finding out their preferred degrees, you can suit your resume writing to highlight your education. 

Getting into a prestigious company is tough. By combining these tips with your qualifications and skills, you will be ready to conquer the company of your choice – and give them the exact candidate they are searching for. 

Read also: Which One is More Important: Degree Certificate or Skill Certificate? 

Things to Never Say to Your Boss

Your boss is not your friend. 

Many will find this statement agreeable, but some others often overlook this point when they get too familiar with their bosses. No matter how close or friendly you are with your employers, a boss is a boss. Manager Joelle Zarcone in her article said that she likes her employees but she does not want to be their friend. There are a number of reasons why managers do not want to befriend their subordinates. 

  • It will be more challenging to manage the team and enforce rules. 
  • Being a friend can open up the potential of favouritism which can endanger the team collaboration
  • It can be difficult to provide honest feedback to a friend. 

Those are the reasons why managers do not want to befriend employees, and here are some good reasons why your boss should stay to be your boss and NOT your friend. 

  • Friends do not require a progress report, while your boss needs it. Without the report, there is a good chance you will not develop professionally in your career. 
  • Managers also play as a role model and leader, while friends are there to support you, not to be your role model. 
  • Managers will always try to change your behaviours and habits to suit the company culture. Friends will accept you as you are. 
  • Friends are equal to each other but your boss is superior to you even if they might be younger than you. 

All in all, if you treat your boss as a friend, you might end up losing the opportunity to progress professionally – which you don’t want, right? 

Now that you understand why your boss should be as they are, you should always treat and speak professionally to them. Your boss might be friendly but maintaining your professionalism will save your future in the company – besides, what has been said could never be taken back. Aside from the obvious, like profanity and insults, here are 5 phrases you should never say to your boss, even if they are super friendly: 

1. “I just can’t stand working with…..”

This statement will backfire at you. You might think that complaining about your colleague is going to get him into your boss’ bad books. But that is not true because complaining about your colleague will most likely ruin your reputation rather than his.

2. “It’s not my fault…”

Your boss is going to see you as a childish 6-year-old if you were to make such a statement. Take full responsibility for the mistake you have made. Even if it is not your fault, avoid saying this. Take an active role to be part of the solution instead.

3. “I can’t……”

When you are not able to complete certain tasks that your boss hands you, never say you cannot do it. You might be in a situation where you have other tasks at hand. Explain the situation to your boss and ask which is more important.

4. “That isn’t my job….”

The tasks asked of you might not be limited to what is in the job description. As long as it is asked of you, it is part of your job.

5. “I emailed you about it last week.”

Your responsibility does not end when you have sent that email to your boss. When you do not get a reply, it is your duty to follow up on the matter.

6. “That’s impossible.” 

Your boss does not want to hear negativity or lack of conviction; most likely they do not even want to hear you complaining about problems over and over again. Thus, if you have concerns, state what they are and ask for input. 

7. “No” 

This is just a plain word of rejection but it could affect your job in many ways. Your cooperation is expected and so is a polite tone. Even if you and your boss tend to joke around, telling him no is inappropriate. It is better to say that you have a matter that is more critical to be done first and that you can handle it later. 

One important note to remember when you speak with your boss is think before you speak. 

Read also: Student-to-Employee Transition: What Can You Learn from an Internship? 

Student-to-Employee Transition: What Can You Learn from an Internship? 

So, are you an intern? Internship is one among many good ways to prepare yourself before really stepping into the world of work. You can learn plenty from the seniors regarding work culture and industry, while discovering your true work interest at the same time. An internship is meant to be part of your education, so you should treat it as a learning experience. It might not have the structure and formalisation of lectures and tutorials, but that does not mean you cannot pick up a few valuable skills that will be very useful in your career.

Here are seven skills you will likely get from doing an internship: 

1- Making a good first impression

In all likelihood, you probably did give a good first impression at your internship interview. But now you have to give that same good first impression to everyone you work with. You will only be there for a few months, so whatever impression people make of you is going to stick, and you are not going to have the luxury of time to change it. Therefore, learn how to give an elevator pitch, engage people, and how to sell yourself to people around you. You can Google how to do all this, but your internship is the best time to practice and hone those skills. These are the soft skills that will land you a job, give you that raise, and bring you that promotion when you are working full-time.  

See also: Which One is More Important: Degree Certificate or Skill Certificate? 

2- Networking

Internship is the best place to nurture relationships and relearn the art of socialising. You are not just making friends now – you are making contacts. The people you work with are people you will necessarily hang out with, but they are not exactly acquaintances either. These are professional relationships that are built upon on a commercial basis instead of a social one, opening up opportunities that you would not have access to otherwise. Likewise, these contacts will be able to offer you far more than you can offer them. So leverage on your youth, your energy, and your adaptability as your selling points.

3- Dealing with difficult people 

At work, there are not only people who are easy going but also those who are difficult to deal with. These difficult individuals are not always bosses, but also co-workers or even subordinates. You have to learn how to address the issues and conflicts that come with the workplace, because they are inevitable. When dealing with difficult employees, do not take it personally, and do not take your work conflicts home with you. Leave them in the workplace where they belong, and draw a line between your personal and professional lives. There are many strategies of dealing with less than pleasant colleagues, but most neglect to mention that you should not bring these burdens back home with you. 

4- Time management and priorities 

Even as a student, you have had to learn how to juggle multiple modules, extra-curricular activities, and parties. But now there is an added element of commercialisation – your time is literally worth money, both to the company and to yourself. Deadlines are no longer as comfortable (or flexible) as before, and you will have to make sacrifices and learn that done is better than perfect. 

5- Your working style 

Learning what makes you the most productive is just one aspect of your working style. If you do not already know it, your internship is the best time for self-discovery to determine how you work. What motivates you? What type of work do you like? What type of work are you good at? You will be surprised to find that you are not always good at the things you like, but if you can learn to like the things you are good at, then you are one of the lucky few.

6- Industry standards and practices 

One day in a workplace can teach you more than one year in the classroom. Pick up the jargon and learn the software, because one day you are going to be a member of the workforce in that industry.

7- Business processes and workflows 

There is always a supply chain, the system that creates the products or services in your trade, and knowing where you stand in that supply chain is very valuable. Although it might seem more like management level issues, it will help better understand the expectations and deadlines levied upon your full-time co-workers, and also know where to troubleshoot when things do not go as expected. 

Read also: Industries with the Most Job Opportunities in 2021

How to Write Graceful Resignation Letter to Not Burn Bridges 

A well-written resignation letter always leaves you with more open doors even after departing from the organisation you once worked at. That being said, a well-executed and graceful exit letter will give you additional leverage in your future job, whether for networking purposes or as staunch referrers.

So, what are the important aspects an individual has to bear in mind when tendering a resignation? Here are some tips to make your resignation letter more digestible and easy to understand, thus not burning bridges between you and your former employers. 

Maintain a formal but friendly tone: Your resignation letter should appear as a formal and friendly business letter starting with an initial name like “Dear First Name,” as against “Dear Mr. X,”. 

Avoid being equivocated: Make it a point to clarify that you are not ready to accept counter offers by using a clear-cut line like, “I hereby tender my resignation letter as effective from (date)”. Ideally, people who are in more senior positions or hold greater responsibilities should give more than two weeks’ notice.

See also: 7 Hard Skills That’ll Guarantee You Job 

Be complimentary: The letter has to be highlighted in such a manner that it shows your gratitude towards the organisation. You can use lines like, “I cannot thank you enough for all that I have learnt and all the chances kindly bestowed upon me during the past five (it can be less or more) years”.

Set the record clean: Since the letter is going to be filed in personal records, you have to pay close attention while presenting the contents of the letter. It is also good practice to mention your accomplishments in it. Taking such a step is necessary as it will put you in a good position in your future endeavor in finding a job. It is also important because there might be a probability that you will be rehired by your former employers. Remember: A well-executed and graceful exit letter will give you additional leverage in your future job. 

Stay positive: Should an upcoming employer seek to verify your employment history, they might speak with somebody who is aware of your pitfalls and strengths. Ideally, you would want them to see that the last words written by you are “positive, uplifting, and thankful”. Even if there are any adverse remarks in your file, the human spirit will be spurred to negate the same, especially if you appear nice and non-threatening on paper. 

Be supportive: Let your employer understand that you are ready to offer help in the transition, if required, after your previous date of employment. Be enthusiastic to share your telephone number with your last employer and convey your preparedness to field any questions on the job front.

End on a warm note: It would be apt if you could end your resignation letter in the following manner: “Dear Hiring Manager, without your able guidance and cooperation, I would not have landed at this job opportunity. I am truly grateful to you and can only hope that my replacement will be as supportive as I was”. Then, sign off your letter on a warm note, such as, “Respectfully yours”, or “Warmest regards”. With a warm tone and words of appreciation, you will get to leave with a fuzzy feeling, and at the same time still be remembered by your colleagues in a positive light.

Read also: Industries with the Most Job Opportunities in 2021 

Posted in All.
Active vs. Passive Candidates and Something in Between

As a job seeker, you must have heard about passive and active candidates. But do you know the difference between both? You might think that the differences are mainly about the personal circumstances and job search activity. More than these, however, each type has its own merits and drawbacks.

Active candidates 

Accounting for approximately 30 percent of the global workforce, active candidates are those individuals who are proactively looking for work opportunities. They might be full-time employed or unemployed. There are a number of reasons why these candidates seek new opportunities, including: 

  • Seeking growth and developing career
  • Making a career change and developing new skills 
  • Relocating to a new town or country
  • Disliking their current employers working practices or culture 
  • Taking early retirement but missing the world of work 
  • Employer was acquired by a new business and they fear their future
  • Downsizing 
  • Quitting the previous job voluntarily or were fired 

In short, active job seekers are the most active on job boards, corporate career pages, and proactively register with recruiters and executive search firms. They spend considerable time polishing personal brand to get the job of their dream. 

See also: Industries with the Most Job Opportunities in 2021 

Passive candidates 

LinkedIn estimates that 70 percent of the global workforce are passive talents. These candidates are not actively job seeking as they have not come to the conclusion to leave their current employer. But this does not mean they are not interested in hearing about new opportunities. 

Passive candidates do not make themselves known to recruiters and other executive search. They will not apply to a job advert and are unlikely to be swayed by a talent acquisition campaign. Commonly, passive candidates are in full-time employment, with potentially long notice periods for senior-level candidates. 

The reasons why some individuals become passive candidates include: 

  • Having the right skills and attributes and continuing to polish these in the nurturing environment of their current employer 
  • Having no pressure to leave, so the acceptance of an interview indicates genuine interest in a role and organisation
  • Not interviewing elsewhere, but are likely to be able to make a fast, informed decision when an offer is made. 

In short, passive candidates are top performers who are qualified but will not be interviewing with competitors. 

The middle category: Tiptoers 

Tiptoers are unlikely to be on the radar of talent acquisition and HR teams. They will be keeping a low profile, proactively reaching out and engaging with their networks in the hope of enquiring and securing referral. 

Tiptoers will not have launched their job search strategy or be applying to open vacancies just yet. They have made an important decision to move on from their current employer for the following reasons: 

  • Seeking to grow and develop their career 
  • Wanting a career change and developing new skills 
  • Wanting a relocation 
  • Disliking their current job, employers, work culture, or working practices 
  • Having early retirement and missing world of work 

In short, tiptoers have made the decision to leave their current company but have not yet started their job search. Thus, they will unlikely to be in an interview process with a recruiter and might even have their job search touch points in pace for a fast turnaround. 

Those are three categories of job seekers, which one are you? 

Read also: 7 Hard Skills That’ll Guarantee You Job 

12 Industries with the Most Job Opportunities in 2021 

The COVID-19 crisis has made the world come to a halt. The employment sector in particular was hit hard, as companies ceased recruiting and some even laid off employees. At the same time, some brick-and-mortar stores were forced to shift and adapt to e-commerce practices because people were not allowed to leave their homes. Fortunately, after a few tough and challenging months, businesses are managing to bounce back and pivot their models.

According to the Seek report, there are a number of industries that are experiencing job growth in the wake of COVID-19. The period between August 2019 and August 2020 saw job ads decrease by 29.1 percent. However, through April 2020, the employment marketplace is reporting that job demand across all states are recovering at different rates, which some states are already returning to pre-COVID job ad levels. 

See also: 7 Hard Skills That’ll Guarantee You Job 

As per Seek report, there are 3 industries which have experienced the highest job growth, including Information and Communication, Technology, Human Resources and Recruitment, Banking and Finance industries. If you are looking for a new job or career, considering HR job or career in finance might be a good choice during the pandemic. If you want to try other careers, here are 10 industries with the most jobs to consider in 2021 (with job ad percentage change by industry)

  • Advertising, arts and media with job ads grow by 16 percent
  • Consulting and strategy with job ads grow by 13 percent 
  • Human resources and recruitment with job ads grow by 12 percent 
  • Legal with job ads grow by 11 percent 
  • Banking and financial services with job ads grow by 7 percent 
  • Farming, animals, and conservation with job ads grow by 7 percent 
  • Design and architecture with job ads grow by 6 percent 
  • Engineering with job ads grow by 5 percent 
  • Marketing and communications with job ads grow by 5 percent 
  • Government and defence with job ads grow by 5 percent
  • Information and communication technology with job ads grow by 4 percent 
  • Healthcare and medical with job ads grow by 1 percent 

New job opportunities are emerging and demand for certain jobs is rising. Don’t miss your chance because the right time to change is today! If you are looking for assistance in career change or growth, our partner Talentvis is here to help. Talentvis is a team of expert recruiters, helping job seekers navigate their current career landscape and find the perfect job. Talentvis could be the RIGHT partner for talents like you – collaborate today

Read also: Career Decision Making Tips for College Graduates